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Kevin Townsend
120 followers -
Writer, thinker, worrier, walker...
Writer, thinker, worrier, walker...

120 followers
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Kevin Townsend's posts

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Dr Monica Horten discusses the Ofcom report on broadband – and finds it wanting. "Unfortunately, the Ofcom review gives neither certainty for industry nor confidence for citizens." The whole thing reeks of a missed opportunity. Even where it actually does something (opening up telephone poles and 'ducts'), this "actually comes from the EU and the 2009 Telecoms Package, so really, Ofcom is taking credit here for something that it should be doing anyway." Ofcom seems to be another regulator that believes it is a business mediator rather than a service regulator. An excellent review that is well worth reading.

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"The reality is that the UK government believes it has a right to all data, personal or not, of all people, British or not. Sooner or later the European Union will have to decide whether it will accept or reject GCHQ spying." So, will the EU consider UK privacy adequate for PII if we leave the EU after the referendum?

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Apple is doing a Microsoft – fighting the government in a battle it cannot win; but gaining public sympathy along the way. My take here (http://itsecurity.co.uk/2016/02/iphone-and-the-fbi-backdoor/); but see also Tara Taubman-Bassirian's excellent Pearltrees collection (http://www.pearltrees.com/idigital/apple-fbi/id15490516)

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'Insights' (http://itsecurity.co.uk/topic/insights/) is a series of discussions on current issues prompted by Chatham House conversations between members of the +Wisegate community of CIOs and CISOs. The latest is on a topic that needs serious consideration: is it time to professionalize infosecurity? If you just want to listen, there's a vlog here: https://youtu.be/Df4DZ7Uyyik

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Business and governments are very good at persuading us that they have our best interests at heart. They do not. They are both masters at deception – pretending to give with one hand and actually taking with the other. Microsoft's device encryption is just another example – freedom of expression is the target.

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Have you have ever wondered what the professionals think about today's hot security issues? Yes? Check out Perspectives (http://itsecurity.co.uk/topic/perspectives/) on ITsecurity.co.uk.

Topics already include:

Should there be a legal right to hack back? (http://itsecurity.co.uk/2015/12/hacking-back-should-business-have-the-right/)
How soon after a breach should you disclose? http://itsecurity.co.uk/2015/12/disclose-how-soon-after-a-breach-should-you-disclose/
Should you block Tor? http://itsecurity.co.uk/2015/11/ciso-view-blocking-tor-from-the-enterprise/
Should you enforce ad blocking? http://itsecurity.co.uk/2015/11/ciso-view-on-enforcing-ad-blocking/
Where now for Safe Harbor? http://itsecurity.co.uk/2015/10/safe-harbor-quo-vadis/

and more...

And if you're a CISO and don't know about +Wisegate, check this: https://www.wisegateit.com/

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An introduction to tech support scams from David Harley. This is invaluable reading for anyone who isn't completely tech-savvy.

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"But the most important question is where these activation keys actually come from. The very fact that these marketplaces are not authorised by game publishers is cause for suspicion, and it would be easy to believe that many of these keys have, figuratively speaking, ‘fallen off the back of a lorry’..." Josh Townsend examines the grey games market.

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Activists, politicians and lawyers are all scrabbling to understand and deflect the implications of Safe Harbor being struck down by the European court. But what do US security practitioners think? These are the people who have to cope with political decisions. We asked a selection of CISOs in the +Wisegate community, what is the future for Safe Harbor?

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It's great when someone who has spent years immersed in the security industry and is as well respected as David Harley can still see the hype. 'Cyberjargon and 100% Security' is a great read. I would just add (in my own humble opinion) that cyber(sorry)security must not be allowed to prevail: governments would have no excuse for war, the massive security industry would die, 3-letter agencies on both sides of the Atlantic could no longer justify their budgets or even their existence, and millions of cyberkids would be out of work. Long live cybercrime! (And I'd be reduced to writing about the village dramatic society.)
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