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Charles Dean Developments Ltd
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Space Planning optimises the effective space within a office getting the most effective layouts whilst coordinating all services. Charles Dean have over forty years experience in this working for the likes of British American Tobacco, Cleanaway, Bristow Helicopters, to name just a few of our Blue Chip clients
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2016-09-07
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Believe it or not, this is the same building - the old area being demolished and the rebuild - You too can have beautiful house designed and created by Charles Dean Developments Ltd
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1/19/16
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Building conservation projects run a high risk of conflict with some of the UK’s rarest animals. The traditional materials, building methods and unmanaged buildings and gardens often associated with restoration projects can appeal to endangered and protected species.

Bats and great crested newts are protected under both the Wildlife and Countryside Act and the Conservation Regulations. It is an offence to intentionally or (in England and Wales) recklessly kill, injure or capture bats and great crested newts or obstruct access to, damage or destroy the resting places used by these animals.

Bats, use several resting places or roost sites throughout the year, and tend to reuse the same roosts for generations. Such sites are protected whether bats are present or not.

Badgers are not protected because they are not rare or endangered but they receive protection under the Protection of Badgers Act because of their history of persecution by man. It is illegal to deliberately kill, injure or take a badger, or to attempt such actions. In addition, it is an offence to intentionally or recklessly destroy a sett, obstruct access to a sett, or disturb a badger while occupying a sett; with a sett defined as ‘any structure or place which displays signs indicating current use by a badger’.
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Don't Waste Energy. Turn your heating down via the thermostat, but not off, especially if you're going away, as it is not worth risking burst pipes. Insurance cover is not covered if the property is unoccupied for more than five days and you turned the heating off. Rule of thumb is keep it to a minimum 14°C.

If you have a burst pipe, the first thing you need to do is turn off the water main stopcock stopping the flow of water into the house. Then turn on all taps & flush toilets (several times) to drain the cold water in the system until the flow dries up. If any electrical sockets are affected, turn off the main electrical supply immediately .
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I am often asked what is a DPC (Damp Proof Course). This video shows a vertical Polythene DPC being installed, normally located 150mm above the external ground level or paving, if landscaped. 

It is a barrier to stop moisture traveling through the fabric of the building. It is normally Polythene or Ruberoid Hyload and both are suitable for solid and cavity wall applications (brick, block, stonework and concrete), as they are resistant to compression even under the heaviest of wall loading and won't extrude under load. It may be horizontal or vertical.

Rising damp is the effect of water rising from the ground into your property normally as the DPC is breached or because it has failed.

Many old buildings are without necessitating the need to inject a DPC involving drilling a series of holes and injecting them with a fluid which increases the density of the brickwork and prevents dampness passing through. The effectiveness of such systems is questionable and the associated workmanship often leaves much to be desired and should therefore be done by experienced contractors. It is part of Building Regulations to incorporate a DPC at the appropriate location.
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The Ryder Lifeboat

The Ryder lifeboat in the foreground has an interesting history.  Built in 1902, she was stationed at Looe until the closure of the lifeboat station there in 1930.  She was launched 12 times, and saved 37 lives.

In private hands for many years, she eventually sank in 1987, and was about to be destroyed before being rescued and restored.  In 1999 she was returned to Polperro, and moored beside the Heritage Museum in the harbour.  One of the few surviving self-righting life boats, which formed the mainstay of the RNLI fleet for over 80 years, she's a great piece of seafaring history.

#cornwall   #polperro   #summer2012  
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Sea Walls

Since 1780, Robin Hood's Bay has lost over 200 houses to the sea.  The older wall to the left here was, I believe, built in the late 19th century.  The newer concrete wall to the right was installed in 1973, and no properties have been lost since then.  However, it is already at the end of its design life, so fears are growing that if not replaced soon, 44 more properties could be lost over the coming years.

#walking   #northyorkshire   #winter2015  
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Japanese knotweed: the scourge that could sink your house sale.

It is essential to remove Japanese Knotweed before any building work is implemented so as to avoid spread of this highly invasive, non-native plant which can damage buildings, structures as it will over-power native species, eventually eradicating them from their own environment.

The plant lies dormant during the winter but starts growing in March/April with red/purple asparagus style shoots which turn into bamboo like hollow stems, growing up to 3m in height, with regular swollen often red, nodes/joints with heart shaped leaves. Flowers bloom 80mm-120mm in long clusters of small green/white flowers. In winter they are like deciduous tree and die back below ground.

It regenerates from rhizome fragments and can remain dormant for over four years making a professional and scientific approach to its eradication vital if 100% success is to be guaranteed.

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, states it an offence to allow the plant to spread and therefore all plants including contaminated soil containing the rhizome, must be removed. These are classified as "controlled waste" requiring all the "duty of care" requirements under the Environmental Protection Act 1990 to be met.

Mortgage lenders & the RICS expect Japanese Knotweed to be noted on residential valuation reports, so if you have it, please remove before it spreads.
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1/12/16
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EXTENSIONS & REFURBISHMENTS (Bromley, Caterham & Sevenoaks). These form an important part of our construction portfolio for both private and public sector clients. No matter what the size or complexity of a project, our aim is to offer an excellent high quality service where you benefit from the years of our skills and knowledge working in the industry.

Charles Dean understands the constraints of working on sites with restricted access and occupied properties which is why we aim to minimise the potential impact necessary for some tasks and we will try to keep your building operational while we work.

During any project, the health & safety of you, your family, staff and visitors is our top priority and we are committed to continuously improving safe working practices, which is reflected in our track record of accident-free working.

We also recognise the importance of being a good neighbour within the communities in which we work by considering the concerns and needs of local people and businesses.
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