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TheMusicEspionage
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http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/manufacturers-specifications-interfaces/

Manufacturers Specifications – Interfaces:

Welcome to part three of The Music Espionage’s tutorials on Manufacturers Specifications. In part one we covered the basics of electricity, Manufacturers Specifications –Electronics. Part two we looked at everything to do with Microphones, Manufacturers Specifications –Microphones. In this posts we will be looking at audio interfaces, Manufacturers Specifications –Interfaces. Here at The Music Espionage we would argue that this piece of equipment changed the way modern artists/musicians record and produce their music. No longer do you need big expensive recording studios to get your music out of your head and into a format that others can listen to. A microphone, a computer and a good interface are all you need.

Read the full tutorial here: http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/manufacturers-specifications-interfaces/
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MANUFACTURERS SPECIFICATIONS – MICROPHONES

http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/manufacturers-specifications-microphones/

Manufacturers Specifications – Microphones: So you now have a better understanding for the basics of electricity, cover in ‘Manufacturers Specifications –Electronics’. Lets now take that and use on maybe the most common piece of equipment in any recording studio…the microphone. Manufacturers Specifications –Microphones will cover the most common specifications listed on the back of any microphone box. After that you will not need to look at these cross-eyed no more, you will know it all! Well hopefully.

http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/manufacturers-specifications-microphones/
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FREE DOWNLOAD!

The ‘Guide to Stereo Recording‘ will help you record using two or more audio channels at once. Basically, any stereo recording is placing two microphones carefully in strategically chosen locations relative to the sound source (the guy with long hair playing the guitar), these are then set to record simultaneously. Each audio channel recorded will be similar, but each will have distinct time-of-arrival and sound-pressure-level information which represents a sense of “Stereo”.

http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/guide-stereo-recording/
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As all Music “Techies” will tell you at some point you will need a basic understanding of what is happening in that speaker, that microphone, that pre-amp or even mixing desk. In Part one of these tutorials we cover Manufacturers Specifications – Electronics.


http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/manufacturers-specifications-electronics/
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http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/waveform-characteristics/

Waveform Characteristics
Waveform Characteristics are an important element in musical synthesis and will help you to shape and alter any tone or timbre you have created, for example in one of Logic’s Software Instruments. Knowing the basic waveforms and what they are useful for will greatly help your understanding of basic synthesis.


Sine Wave
This is pure tone made of only the fundamental frequency and nothing else. Every sound whether it is natural or synthetic is made up of sine waves. Pretty boring alone, but when numerous sine waves of different pitches and amplitudes are mixed together the sonic possibilities becomes endless.

Read more here:
http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/waveform-characteristics/
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Happy St. patrick's day!!!! From the people at The Music Espionage!
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Thinking of recording some drums!?!? How about with one microphone?......wait what? Really?

Drums are often the one element of any recording that could laterally take days on end to get just right. From placement of microphones, isolation of all the different elements and reducing all the rattling it is no wonder it takes so long. However, many forget that the average listener will not be listening to the amount of attack on the snare, the extent of bass behind the kick and the ring on the cymbals, unless that is, it is so noticeable you can hear nothing else.

The best method is to try to think as the drums as a whole instrument, where total isolation between each different part and individual element may not be completely necessary. Approaching the drums with the idea that each separate microphone must only record what it is pointing at, is as impossible as recording a guitar with six microphones, one for each string! Bleeding and spill between the microphone is natural, of course you will want more of one thing than another, but you could never truly remove everything, no matter how much Gating or EQ you perform.

http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/recording-drums-with-on…/
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