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Ted Arlauskas
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Incredible Obi Wan Kenobi cosplay.
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Really happy with how my map came together for our Savage Worlds session last night. The nature of the adventure required a map and the one that came in the printed material was built around Conan canon and was oriented opposite to our established game world, so I whipped one together in Powerpoint. I think +S. John Ross's Apple Butter font really helped make it look like a convincing Fantasy map.
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Just picked up these playing cards for our next Savage Worlds game.
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Ted Arlauskas commented on a post on Blogger.
Your maps have a great look. I'm excited to see what you come up with next on your big (9") hexes.
BTW - what is that wheel in your Savage Worlds game pictures?

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*The History of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop #MusicMonday *
https://blog.adafruit.com/2017/01/02/the-history-of-the-bbc-radiophonic-workshop-musicmonday/

Over at UbuWeb Film & Video, you can watch the fantastic 2003 documentary The Alchemists of Sound, which chronicles the work of the pioneering sound engineers and artists of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop.

As you watch, you’ll soon realize that the BBC Radiophonic Workshop was behind the music that accompanied the BBC’s most iconic programs of the era. This includes the original Dr. Who theme (above) from 1963 by Ron Grainer and Delia Derbyshire.

The BBC’s Radiophonic Workshop was set up in 1958, born out of a desire to create ‘new kinds of sounds’. The Alchemists of Sound looks at this creative group from its inception, through its golden age when it was supplying music and effects for cult classics like Doctor Who, Blake’s Seven and Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, and charts its fading away in 1995 when, due to budget cuts, it was no longer able to survive.

Read more
https://blog.adafruit.com/2017/01/02/the-history-of-the-bbc-radiophonic-workshop-musicmonday/

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My group plays D&D in-person every week. We enjoy using all the map graphics that WotC's published adventures have (thank-you Mike Schley and Jared Blando among others). Over the years I've tried to purchase, print, and assemble all the maps using PosteRazor so I can bring them to the table and we can all ogle them while we use them. It's been an expensive endeavor over the last few years...

Last week we finally tried out a digital battlemap. All I was interested in (as DM) was being able to use fog of war, not have to spend hundreds of dollars on Fantasy Grounds or Roll20, and not need a laptop to use it. We're old farts that don't do Virtual gaming, so many of the options out there weren't for us. But I'd discovered and backed InfinitasDM on Kickstarter, and finally got to try it out.

It worked wonders for us.

I took the base off my older (non-smart) TV and made a frame for it to rest on. I purchased the app on my iPhone for $10, bought a Chromecast device for $40 (which requires wifi), and voila! $50 total.

Now I can download my collection of map images from Dropbox or Google Drive to my phone's photos, upload them into the app, use fog of war to reveal the map as we go along, and my players can move their own minis or pawns on the surface of the TV itself without needing to have their heads buried in a computer screen.

No laptop. No multi-hundred dollar investment. Just a digital map that lets us play around the table, in person, using fog of war and any map we need. They get the in-person experience of rolling their own dice, handing their own minis, and using pencil and paper without having a computer to bury their heads in.

This is going to save me so much assembly time and hundreds of dollars in printing costs, and I thought I'd share. For my group, this was the best integration of digital and in-person play. It was a huge step up for us, and while the app is simple it can do a bit more without seeming to devolve into an insurmountable user-interface-morass and learning curve. No frills, no bells and whistles, no automated random encounter programming, no laptops to hide behind. For us, just a digital map.

I'm not usually a "product pusher", but this one is literally changing our game for the better and I wanted to share the excitement of our discovery.

InfinitasDM.com
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