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ASNT, certification, consulting, business development, NDE, NDT, non-destructive testing, Brazil, South America
ASNT, certification, consulting, business development, NDE, NDT, non-destructive testing, Brazil, South America

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NDT and Nanomanufacturing ! 
Industry Buzz: NIST Invents Test for Nanomanufacturing Quality Control
Manufacturers may soon have a speedy and nondestructive way to test a wide array of materials under real-world conditions, thanks to an advance that researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made in roll-to-roll measurements. Roll-to-roll measurements are typically optical measurements for roll-to-roll manufacturing, any technique that uses conveyor belts for continuous processing of items, from tires to nanotechnology components.
In order for new materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene to play an increasingly important role in electronic devices, high-tech composites and other applications, manufacturers will need quality-control tests to ensure that products have desired characteristics, and lack discontinuities. Current test procedures often require cutting, scratching or otherwise touching a product, which slows the manufacturing process and can damage or even destroy the sample being tested.
To add to existing testing noncontact techniques, NIST physicists Nathan Orloff, Christian Long, and Jan Obrzut measured properties of films by passing them through a specially designed metal box known as a microwave cavity. Electromagnetic waves build up inside the cavity at a specific “resonance” frequency determined by the box’s size and shape, similar to how a guitar string vibrates at a specific pitch depending on its length and tension. When an object is placed inside the cavity, the resonance frequency changes in a way that depends on the object’s size, electrical resistance and dielectric constant, a measure of an object’s ability to store energy in an electric field. The frequency change is reminiscent of how shortening or tightening a guitar string makes it resonate at a higher pitch, said Orloff.
The researchers also built an electrical circuit to measure these changes. They first tested their device by running a strip of plastic tape known as polyimide through the cavity, using a roll-to-roll setup resembling high-volume roll-to-roll manufacturing devices used to mass-produce nanomaterials. As the tape’s thickness increased and decreased—the researchers made the changes in tape thickness spell “NIST” in Morse code—the cavity’s resonant frequency changed in tandem. So did another parameter called the “quality factor,” which is the ratio of the energy stored in the cavity to the energy lost per frequency cycle. Because polyimide’s electrical properties are well known, a manufacturer could use the cavity measurements to monitor whether tape is coming off the production line at a consistent thickness—and even feeding back information from the measurements to control the thickness.
Alternatively, a manufacturer could use the new technique to monitor the electrical properties of a less well-characterized material of known dimensions. Orloff and Long demonstrated this by passing 12 and 15 cm (4.7 and 5.9 in.) long films of carbon nanotubes deposited on sheets of plastic through the cavity and measuring the films’ electrical resistance. The entire process took “less than a second,” said Orloff. He added that with industry-standard equipment, the measurements could be taken at speeds beyond 10 m/s (32.8 ft/s), more than enough for many present-day manufacturing operations.
The new technique has several advantages for a thin-film manufacturer, said Orloff. One, “You can measure the entire thing, not just a small sample,” he said. Such real-time measurements could be used to tune the manufacturing process without shutting it down, or to discard a faulty batch of product before it gets out the factory door. “This method could significantly boost prospects of not making a faulty batch in the first place,” Long noted.
And because the technique is nondestructive, Orloff added, “If a batch passes the test, manufacturers can sell it.”
Films of carbon nanotubes and graphene are just starting to be manufactured in bulk for potential applications such as composite airplane materials, smartphone screens, and wearable electronic devices.
Orloff, Long, and Obrzut submitted a patent application for this technique in December 2015.
A producer of such materials has already expressed interest in the new technique, said Orloff. “They’re really excited about it.” He added that the technique is not specific to nanomanufacturing, and with a properly designed cavity, could also help with quality control of many other kinds of products, including tires, pharmaceuticals, and even beer.
Published press release do not constitute an endorsement of any company, product, or service. Due to high volume of releases received, not all releases can be published. Press releases may be edited for content and style purposes. To submit a press release, please contact Toni Kervina, Associate Editor, at tkervina@asnt.org

ASNT International Scope! 
ASNT in an International Scope
It was a year ago, in the March 2015 issue of Materials Evaluation, that I announced a small, but important change. Our central offices that house ASNT staff, operations, resources, and programs would no longer be known as headquarters or “HQ,” but instead receive a title that is fitting of what we do and whom we serve: the International Service Center.

This change came at a time in which we, as a Society, began to open up and embrace the truth that ASNT is truly international in its scope. With globalization and communication rapidly changing the business and economic landscape, we knew that we could no longer turn a blind eye to what was happening all around us. We knew that we had to be involved. 

Since that time, I am proud to report that our members, staff, and Board of Directors have made great strides to see that we live up to that fact by taking a collaborative, global approach to accomplishing our goals.

First, I am proud to share that the officers of the Board have been traveling extensively, mostly on their own time, to personally connect with their volunteer counterparts representing ASNT’s sister societies. This face-to-face contact is crucial to building healthy, lasting relationships, establishing a deeper level of mutual understanding, and demonstrating that ASNT is a thoughtful, participative Society with a proactive, dedicated leadership that is ready to listen and engage. These meetings are critical to laying a strong foundation to fulfill our mission.

Another important development recently is that ASNT will serve as the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to eight subcommittees in the International Standards Organization (ISO). As we work towards our goal of the global harmonization of certification systems, this appointment allows us the opportunity to provide our certification perspective to the standards process, and also serves as an opportunity to listen and understand the needs of other certification schemes.

I am also proud to report that we have submitted a bid to the International Committee for Non-Destructive Testing (ICNDT) to host the 2024 World Conference on Nondestructive Testing (WCNDT). While I firmly believe that we have the resources and expertise within our membership and staff to create and worthwhile and memorable program, I know that collaborating with other societies in ICNDT will make for an exceptionally powerful and inclusive experience.

And as we have done over the last year, the Board of Directors will continue to identify new partnerships and strengthen existing relationships with other NDT societies as well as organizations like ASTM International, the American Welding Society, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Petroleum Institute, and NACE International that share similar philosophies and goals of creating a safer world. We are eager for every chance to meet and exchange ideas with all of these critical groups.

This progress is exciting and it could never have occurred without your involvement, without your input, and without your dedication and enthusiasm for what this Society can become. It is clear, no matter which country you are from, which certification you hold, or which societies you are involved with, you are reading this because you share something in common with everyone else in your profession: the desire to create a safer world.

I welcome your thoughts and ideas for how ASNT can best serve the international community. Please feel free to e-mail, call, or visit us here at the International Service Center.

Sincerely,
Dr. Arny Bereson 
Executive Director 
The American Society for Nondestructive Testing

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NDT and Nanomanufacturing ! 
Industry Buzz: NIST Invents Test for Nanomanufacturing Quality Control
Manufacturers may soon have a speedy and nondestructive way to test a wide array of materials under real-world conditions, thanks to an advance that researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made in roll-to-roll measurements. Roll-to-roll measurements are typically optical measurements for roll-to-roll manufacturing, any technique that uses conveyor belts for continuous processing of items, from tires to nanotechnology components.
In order for new materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene to play an increasingly important role in electronic devices, high-tech composites and other applications, manufacturers will need quality-control tests to ensure that products have desired characteristics, and lack discontinuities. Current test procedures often require cutting, scratching or otherwise touching a product, which slows the manufacturing process and can damage or even destroy the sample being tested.
To add to existing testing noncontact techniques, NIST physicists Nathan Orloff, Christian Long, and Jan Obrzut measured properties of films by passing them through a specially designed metal box known as a microwave cavity. Electromagnetic waves build up inside the cavity at a specific “resonance” frequency determined by the box’s size and shape, similar to how a guitar string vibrates at a specific pitch depending on its length and tension. When an object is placed inside the cavity, the resonance frequency changes in a way that depends on the object’s size, electrical resistance and dielectric constant, a measure of an object’s ability to store energy in an electric field. The frequency change is reminiscent of how shortening or tightening a guitar string makes it resonate at a higher pitch, said Orloff.
The researchers also built an electrical circuit to measure these changes. They first tested their device by running a strip of plastic tape known as polyimide through the cavity, using a roll-to-roll setup resembling high-volume roll-to-roll manufacturing devices used to mass-produce nanomaterials. As the tape’s thickness increased and decreased—the researchers made the changes in tape thickness spell “NIST” in Morse code—the cavity’s resonant frequency changed in tandem. So did another parameter called the “quality factor,” which is the ratio of the energy stored in the cavity to the energy lost per frequency cycle. Because polyimide’s electrical properties are well known, a manufacturer could use the cavity measurements to monitor whether tape is coming off the production line at a consistent thickness—and even feeding back information from the measurements to control the thickness.
Alternatively, a manufacturer could use the new technique to monitor the electrical properties of a less well-characterized material of known dimensions. Orloff and Long demonstrated this by passing 12 and 15 cm (4.7 and 5.9 in.) long films of carbon nanotubes deposited on sheets of plastic through the cavity and measuring the films’ electrical resistance. The entire process took “less than a second,” said Orloff. He added that with industry-standard equipment, the measurements could be taken at speeds beyond 10 m/s (32.8 ft/s), more than enough for many present-day manufacturing operations.
The new technique has several advantages for a thin-film manufacturer, said Orloff. One, “You can measure the entire thing, not just a small sample,” he said. Such real-time measurements could be used to tune the manufacturing process without shutting it down, or to discard a faulty batch of product before it gets out the factory door. “This method could significantly boost prospects of not making a faulty batch in the first place,” Long noted.
And because the technique is nondestructive, Orloff added, “If a batch passes the test, manufacturers can sell it.”
Films of carbon nanotubes and graphene are just starting to be manufactured in bulk for potential applications such as composite airplane materials, smartphone screens, and wearable electronic devices.
Orloff, Long, and Obrzut submitted a patent application for this technique in December 2015.
A producer of such materials has already expressed interest in the new technique, said Orloff. “They’re really excited about it.” He added that the technique is not specific to nanomanufacturing, and with a properly designed cavity, could also help with quality control of many other kinds of products, including tires, pharmaceuticals, and even beer.
Published press release do not constitute an endorsement of any company, product, or service. Due to high volume of releases received, not all releases can be published. Press releases may be edited for content and style purposes. To submit a press release, please contact Toni Kervina, Associate Editor, at tkervina@asnt.org

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Vamos esta ao vivo neste feira itnernacional. Participe ja!!
http://www.fabtechexpo.com/

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AWS ASNT NDE Level III Project manager with International Experience, business development.
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