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Karl Smithe
1,662 followers -
cyber-geek, economic radical
cyber-geek, economic radical

1,662 followers
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John Doe: Vigilante

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCIDrhSmj_Q

Holy Crap! An interesting flik that isn't fundamentally stupid!

What is the world coming to?

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It is so curious that I don't see educators mentioning anything like this:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.neverland.alreader

AIReader

Combine this with Project Gutenberg and things become so much easier. Eliminate all of that mental anguish of forcing your way through books that you can't stand to read. We don't need no Education! Pink Floyd can chill!

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Project Gutenberg has invaded the planet Vulcan

Logic as the Science of the pure Concept, by
Benedetto Croce
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/54137/54137-h/54137-h.htm

Spock will have a fit!

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Here is something interesting:

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/54130

A little research on the author may take it from interesting to noteworthy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_Lef%C3%A8vre

So what has happened to Wall Street in 100 years?

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The Life and Times of Cleopatra,
Queen of Egypt
by Arthur E.P. Brome Weigall

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/54038/54038-h/54038-h.htm

They didn't tell me about this in high school.  Of course it was not easy to get for free back then.

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Karl Smithe commented on a post on Blogger.
But there is SCIENCE Fiction and there is Science Fiction and there is science FICTION.  Arthur C. Clarke's A Fall of Moondust is SCIENCE Fiction.  Lois Bujold''s Komarr is Science Fiction and Alan Dean Foster's Tar Ayim Krang is science  FICTION.   LOL

I wrote a computer program that counts the science and fantasy words in a work and computes an SF and Fantasy word density.   1.000 means 1 science of fantasy word per 1,000 characters including punctuation.  A Fall of Moondust has a science word density of 1.2.  Most SF is less than that, some less than 0.20.

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I have not read this book:

https://www.packtpub.com/hardware-and-creative/learning-beaglebone-python-programming

I just got it.  This book has more to say about interrupts than any other book I have seen about the Beaglebone or the Raspberry Pi.  Most books say little to nothing about them.  If you do not understand interrupts then you don't know how computers work.  You don't have to be able to code them to understand the basics.  But really sophisticated hardware projects on these micro-computers will need them.

That is funny.  I was really annoyed when microcomputers became PCs.  It was just marketing nonsense.  But devices like the Raspberry Pi are definitely microcomputers.

I have a Raspberry Pi 3, a Beaglebone Black and a Beaglebone Green Wireless.  I have run a C benchmark program on the Pi and the BBBlack.  You can find the program in the Jan 1983 Byte magazine where the fastest machine was the IBM 3033 that cost $3 million.  The Beaglebone is faster than the IBM and the RasPi 3 is slightly faster than that.  But the RasPi 3 has 4 cores and can run the program 4 times simultaneously at full speed.

The Internet of Things will make these devices even more pervasive but they must handle interrupts.  This book looks like a really good place to start..  But we need a Python compiler.  LOL

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Computers in education 1996

These dropout prevention programs dramatize the efficacy of computerized education. Computers can teach students of different ages, teach them well, and make learning enjoyable. However, we have to remember that these are initial programs. Software is just beginning to expose the potential of computerized education. These "at-risk" programs don't even tap into the staggering possibilities that multimedia opens up, and about which I will talk in Chapter 14 (in the January, 1997 issue of First Monday). Despite the demonstrated results with students in these rudimentary programs, American schools generally have ignored the results and continue on their usual well trodden paths. Most don't even investigate how computers could, at a minimum, revitalize the education of the hordes of students who are "at-risk," who become pariahs in a technological world. Schools continue to spew out millions of illiterates. This deprivation of students is both astounding and deplorable.

http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/500/421

So why haven't educators figured out what to do since 1996?

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