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Karl Smithe
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Karl Smithe

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http://www.biography.com/people/harriet-tubman-9511430

Project Gutenberg has a biography in the Public Domain
Harriet, The Moses of Her People, by Sarah H. Bradford
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/9999/9999-h/9999-h.htm
Go to Biography.com to learn about the courageous and inspiring life of Harriet Tubman, a woman who led enslaved people to freedom along the Underground Railroad.
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There is an audiobook version in a volume from Librivox:

https://librivox.org/short-nonfiction-collection-vol-043
It is not the same as the Project Gutenberg version.

This review says that biography is exaggerated.
http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/harriet/summary.html
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In 1976 I read The Screwing of the Average Man by David Hapgood.  That book made so much sense it was scary and I concluded there was something wrong with what I was taught about economics in college.  So I decided to read Samuelson's ECONOMICS to find what was wrong and do it cover to cover if I had to.  What I found is that our economists ignore Demand Side Depreciation.  Throw away lots of cars, they never get subtracted from anywhere.  Who cares?

But in 1977 John Kenneth Galbraith produced a series about economics for the BBC.  When Milton Friedman heard about it then he had to have one.  Galbraith blew Friedman away.  Galbraith was informative, Friedman came across as a propagandist.

But things were different then.  In 77 the world population had only recently passed 4 billion.  Now we are approaching 8 billion.  We are free to be dumb until the planet is totally screwed up.  Neither of them suggested mandatory accounting in our schools.

http://www.toxicdrums.com/economic-wargames-by-dal-timgar.html


http://www.openculture.com/2014/01/milton-friedman-john-kenneth-galbraith-tv-shows.html
Do Milton Friedman and John Kenneth Galbraith debate in that great economics department in the sky? Both men died in 2006, after remarkably long and distinguished careers as two of the most widely read economists of the 20th century, yet I can only with great difficulty imagine them ever agreeing.
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Science fiction has been invaded by stupidity since Star Wars.
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I think the only way to escape the "talking squids from outer space" is to change the name.  We need STEM Fiction!
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The concept of 'psychohistory' is very interesting from today's perspective relative to when Asimov presented it in.  He started writing this in 1941. There was no nationwide broadcast television.  It is said television was delayed by World War II and by the end the atomic bomb had been dropped.

How many television commercials have been made with advice from psychologists by now?  Hasn't television changed psychohistory?  LOL  Now the Internet is in the game and everyone can play.
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By Memory I thought it was obvious that Ivan was an under appreciated character.  He didn't seem as dumb as Bujold was always having her other characters talk about him as being.  I suspect that Bujold is too intellignt herself to be good at writing dumb characters.  So I thought CVA was hilarious and great.

I was kind of dissappointed with Cryoburn on my first reading also.  But there is more depth to the background if you think about it.  That planet does not have any technology that other planets in the Nexus do not.  But they have done something with it that no one else has.

Look at us with the Planned Obsolescence of automobiles.  There were One Billion cars by 2010.  But 30 years before the Moon landing engineers could design flying machines that could do 400 mph to fight WWII.   Why do we keep redesigning cars that roll along the ground at less than 150 mph?  Science fiction readers read SF but then do not think about the stupid things done with the technology all around us in the real world.
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"Why do we keep redesigning cars that roll along the ground at less than 150 mph?"

Because Reaction Time. In the air you have a lot more time to react to an incorrect angle; a lot of time it may not matter at all other than perhaps making the trip longer. On the ground, there is a white van turning directly in front of you, or a pothole.

At 150 miles per hour, you are traveling 220 feet per second. Recommended separation distance in good conditions is 2 seconds; up to 4 seconds in bad conditions. That would be 440 feet to 880 feet, which would be 1/12 mile to 1/6 mile. That is about 1 1/2 to 3 city blocks (depending on the city and the road conditions). That density is unsustainable in the city, far too low, and trying to turn or cross such a street without a stoplight would be very nerve wracking.

On the interstate highways... we can't afford to maintain them to driving conditions and banking angles compatible with driving that quickly.

Energy of collisions (whether with another vehicle or with a tree or center divider) rise as the square of velocity; at 150 miles per hour survival rate would be small.

Aerodynamic drag rises as the square of velocity as well and becomes pretty significant: it takes 4 times as much energy to go 150 miles per hour as it does 75 miles per hour. Do we have the available energy to make that feasible for routine use?

Race-car drivers have to be extremely fit; the acceleration stresses and the concentration required are immense. People would have to train to drive 150 miles per hour. But they wouldn't. Over 80% of US drivers rate themselves as being above-average drivers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illusory_superiority#Driving_ability
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Holy Crap!  Did Voyager's 7 of 9 come from this 709?
The American Forces Radio and Television service touched a lot of people. Whether talent, support or listeners it touched a lot of us in ways that stateside media could only dream of. This website is unofficial and does not imply any endorsement from AFRTS, the Department of Defense or the ...
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Vomit Zombies are Hard SF, right!
I'm binging my way through The Expanse right now. I've not read the books the series is based on but I've added them to my reading list. The very short version is settlement of the solar system has begun, with Mars colonized ...
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No. Zombies are shit fiction.
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Blast from the Past with Greek Raspberry

LOL Does that make any kind of sense?

$35 Raspberry Pi 3 more powerful than $3,000,000 mainframe, circa 1980.

33 years ago the January 1983 Byte magazine published an article on benchmarks run on a wide range of computers. 8 bit micro-computers had been around for some time and 16-bit machines were not yet dominating the market. There was still a shortage of 16-bit software, the IBM PC AT-286 computer was a year away and the Intel 386 was three years away. But of course no one knew that at the time.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/11/23/test_template?page=3

So how powerful were all of those toy computers and the glorius 16-bit machines to come? What was a reasonable benchmark that would run on everything? The 8-bit processors did not have multiply and divide instructions so they would be blown away by any tests using heavy math. An ancient Greek dude came up with a method of finding Prime Numbers that required no computation, called the Sieve of Eratosthenes. Byte provided source code in multiple languages and ran the tests with multiple compilers of the same language when possible. This was done by volunteers all over the country.

The fastest machine was an IBM 3033 running assembly language taking 7.8 miliseconds for 10 loops. Getting an accurate measurement required 100,000 loops. The slowest machine was a Z-80 running Microsoft COBOL, taking 1 hour 25 minutes and 15 seconds. I presume they did not do 100,000 loops. Oh yeah, they would still be looping. An IBM PC running assembly language took 4 seconds. So IBM's mainframe was 500 times faster than their new desktop with a brain from Intel.

I have had my new Raspberry Pi 3 for a week now and crashed it once and had to reinstall the operating system. But ages ago I wrote a C program that duplicated the Byte benchmark. The Pi Linux install comes with a GNU C Compiler so I had to see what would happen. It compiled with two warning messages but produced executable code.

The Pi 3 takes 4.7 ms to run one instance of the program in one core. So 4 versions ran simultaneously, 1 in each core at 4.7 ms each. Running 8 instances of the program slowed things down with 2 in each core taking 8.8 ms each. Something is keeping it from doubling the time to 9.4 ms. So running 8 instances of the Byte benchmark took only a little longer than running 1 instance on the IBM 3033, a $35 machine versus a $3,000,000 machine with a 33 year time dilation.

3 is a Magic Number.

The only other ARM powered device I have tested is the Archos PMA400, a 2005 Linux based pocket computer. It took 52.2 ms and had only one core. So the Pi wins by a factor of 11 with one core and 44 with all of them. So 11 years and 33 years make a big difference. The Archos beat the mainframe in size and price at $800, but not processing power. The Raspberry won all 3 categories.

Beware of Greeks and Moore's Law, they will blow you a Raspberry.
The golden days of computer mags, replete with ancient adverts
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I started this after reading Ready Player One.   Because I was so shocked by how much RP1 exceeded my expectations I thought this one might also.  Unfortunately it was pretty much what I had expected RP1 to be so I quit before getting half way through.  I am not one of those people that has to finish a book.
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Good on you for being honest. And for not trudging through 'boring'.
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