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Karl Smithe
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Karl Smithe

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What if we eventually create "intelligent" humanoid robots and they decide they don't want to be humanoid?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4ZCSvQoo0s

Now that is science fiction.  LOL
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True. Of all things, why would an artificial intelligence choose to take on a humanoid appearance? 
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Karl Smithe

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At 1:55 he has Wells and Verne but he never mentions Frankenstein.

Mary Shelley is the mother of Philosophical SF
Jules Verne is the father of Hard SF
H. G. Wells is the father of Social SF

Most good stories have some mixture of those characteristics but lots of SF is just adventure with sci-fi tropes.
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If they would only spend as much money on this:

http://sites.inka.de/mips/reviews/TheTwoFacesOfTomorrow.html

as they spent to make Jurassic World.
James P. Hogan The Two Faces of Tomorrow (1979) Reviewed: 1997-05-19. Back at the time this novel was written, Hogan was one of very few authors who actually knew how computers worked or how they were used in practice, and what the areas of research and projected future developments were.
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Karl Smithe

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What is with people who weave through traffic?   What could have been going through his mind when he saw what he was about to hit?
http://www.castlerockagency.com/images/stories/news/self-driving-cars.gif
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People are idiots. I consider "expecting everyone on the road purposefully trying to kill you" as at least 50% of good driving. In my case, I'd call it 90% as I've still never been in an accident, and avoided more than I can even remember.
Someone hits you, you're not a good driver.
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Karl Smithe

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An interesting recapitulation of three major ideas of Western Culture presented in a science fiction format without humans. The ideas are more important than the story but the story makes the ideas more interesting than traditional education.

http://93.114.44.238/viewtopic.php?f=1293&t=365358&start=0

http://www.christian-sauve.com/1998/02/the-quintaglio-trilogy-robert-j-sawyer/

If there is any intelligent life out there it will have to deal with the same physics as all of us other aliens.
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I've read Sawyer's 'Calculating God', which was a very pleasant read with a few interesting ideas sprinkled in, will add this one to my reading queue.
Thanks for sharing!
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So does our social power structure want grade school kids to read good futuristic science fiction to create a populace to think rationally about the future?

Subversive (1962) by Mack Reynolds
http://www.digilibraries.com/ebook/115574/Subversive/
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+Julien Lambot
  The trouble is so much stuff called SFis merely entertainment and lots of it is crap.  But the worthwhile stuff is seriously thought provoking.
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Science Fiction Criticism:

http://web.archive.org/web/20050311002714/http://home.earthlink.net/~judithberman/fiction/sffuture.html

I read lots of old stuff even when I have read it before.  Modern SF has gotten dumb and depressing.  Kids with smarphones having the power of 1980s mainframes who can't explain what an electron is annoy me.  LOL
SCIENCE FICTION WITHOUT THE FUTURE. by Judith Berman. This essay first appeared in the May 2001 issue of The New York Review of Science Fiction (vol. 13, no. 9:pp. 1, 6-8). At conventions and parties and in private conversation, I've been hearing for years now about the declining subscription ...
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I was actually just having a conversation with a support guy from our VOIP provider (completely unrelated to our VOIP problem) about how SF (especially pre-1990) had a massive positive effect on business, as CEO's who didn't read sci-fi, make very poor long term decisions as they just aren't foward thinking.
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Karl Smithe

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Climate deniers blame natural factors; NASA data proves otherwise
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But how much excess CO2 production is the result of Planned Obsolescence that economists do not talk about?
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Karl Smithe

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How much do consumers lose on the depreciation of automobiles every year in every country?  Oops!  That is too difficult a question for economists.  Making junk designed to fall apart creates JOBS!
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So when does anyone ever specify what ideas are explored in reviews of specific stories?  Lots of talk about characterization and world building and 1st person or 3rd person.

I wrote a program that counts science and fantasy words in works and computes a science and fantasy density for each work.  Most SF fans I've mentioned it to are not interested.  I have even encountered discussions of works where the story got the science correct and the fans who claim to like the work got it wrong.

Arthur C. Clarke's A Fall of Moon Dust has a science word density of 1.024.   1.00 would mean one science word used for every 1,000 characters.  Dune and Ender's Game both score somewhere between 0.3 and 0.4.
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Have them in circles
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