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Anne Young
286 followers -
Family historian
Family historian

286 followers
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A useful source of information about my family is an album of photographs that came to me from my parents-in-law Peter Young (1920 – 1988) and Marjorie (1920 – 2003). A few years before he died Peter spent an afternoon going through the photos with me,…
The Mallee kids
The Mallee kids
ayfamilyhistory.com
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My father has a second cousin once removed, ‘GH’. I am GH’s 2nd cousin twice removed. GH’s daughter administers his DNA kits. She asked me an interesting question. On the DNA evidence, is this the same person: Ancestry – AnneYoungAU on Ancestry (shares 33…
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In my personal genealogical research I use the online tools at Ancestry.com to keep track of my forebears and the dates, events, sources, stories, and all the various documents and images directly and indirectly associated with them. The core of this is…
Book making with MyCanvas
Book making with MyCanvas
ayfamilyhistory.com
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For a couple of days I have been experimenting with new DNA-analysis tools from GeneticAffairs.com developed by Evert-Jan Blom, a Dutch genetic genealogist. The GeneticAffairs.com website automates the retrieval of new genetic matches from AncestryDNA,…
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One of my 12th great grandmothers was Anne Bray nee Vaux. Born in 1550, she was one of four children of Thomas Vaux (1509 – 1556) and Elizabeth Vaux nee Cheney (1505 – 1556). In 1556, when she was about six, Anne’s parents died: Thomas in October and…
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My 11th great grandmother was Temperance Crew nee Bray (abt 1577 – 1619). She was the wife of Sir Thomas Crew (1564 – 1634), a lawyer and politician. His entry in the History of Parliament online mentions his marriage to her, noting that she was the…
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My father has a small collection of family portraits. One is a miniature of his father Richard Geoffrey “Geoff” Champion de Crespigny (1908 – 1966) as a child. The portrait is signed  ‘O. A. Chatfield’. This was Olive Amy Chatfield (1880 – 1945). Olive…
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Anne Young commented on a post on Blogger.
I discussed your post with my daughter who is studying AI and builds neural networks. She suggests that what is needed is an explanation for each assertion of a relationship on a family tree. We haven’t discussed it much but just starting to think about it. Online family trees do not allow you to explain how you came to your conclusions even if you attach citations. I really have my doubts about whether an AI could do more than pick holes with the logic, eg child born after mother has died ... It usually takes a considerable narrative to explain how you are confident about your findings. A tree is merely a summary. As such trees are useful as hints and no more. Just as published genealogies from past centuries were, for example Burke’s Landed Gentry. They are often helpful but can include mistakes. The difference with online trees might be the democratisation of genealogy, that is ordinary people are being documented, not just the landed classes. Even though it will take an effort to confirm relationships, the hints offered by online trees are still useful as they contain relationships that might be difficult to detect otherwise.
The Future of Online Trees
The Future of Online Trees
parallax-viewpoint.blogspot.com
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My husband Greg and I have had our DNA tested. We used ancestry.com. The tools that ancestry.com employs to compare details of family trees and shared DNA matches to help establish how we are related to others who have also tested at ancestry.com are…
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Lest we forget
Lest we forget
avocaww1.blogspot.com
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