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Humana People to People
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#CommunityDevelopment #UnitedNationsSDG2030 #ClimateChange #TeacherTraining #Education #Ruralsustainablefarming #HIVandAIDS #Foodsecurity
#CommunityDevelopment #UnitedNationsSDG2030 #ClimateChange #TeacherTraining #Education #Ruralsustainablefarming #HIVandAIDS #Foodsecurity

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Some 3 in 10 people worldwide, or 2.1 billion, lack access to safe, readily available water at home, and 6 in 10, or 4.5 billion, lack safely managed sanitation, according to a new report by WHO and UNICEF.

“Safe water, sanitation and hygiene at home should not be a privilege of only those who are rich or live in urban centres,” says Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. “These are some of the most basic requirements for human health, and all countries have a responsibility to ensure that everyone can access them.”

Billions of people have gained access to basic drinking water and sanitation services since 2000, but these services do not necessarily provide safe water and sanitation. Many homes, healthcare facilities and schools also still lack soap and water for handwashing. This puts the health of all people – but especially young children – at risk for diseases, such as diarrhoea.

As a result, every year, 361 000 children under 5 years of age die due to diarrhoea. Poor sanitation and contaminated water are also linked to transmission of diseases such as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and typhoid.

“Safe water, effective sanitation and hygiene are critical to the health of every child and every community – and thus are essential to building stronger, healthier, and more equitable societies,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “As we improve these services in the most disadvantaged communities and for the most disadvantaged children today, we give them a fairer chance at a better tomorrow.”

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ADPP Mozambique, a Stop TB partner, is undertaking active TB case finding covering a population of 214,000 mineworkers, ex-mineworkers, their family members and their communities with the aim of reducing the TB burden in Mozambique, Malawi, Tanzania, Botswana, Namibia, Lesotho, Swaziland and Zambia. #SDGs #SustDev2030 #EndTB2030 #UNAIDS909090 
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Since 2000, the number of girls not attending school has plunged by 40% from more than 200 million worldwide. That’s pretty good progress. But with 130 million girls still not in school and millions more who go to school but don’t learn the basics, there’s still a lot more work to do. #Educationcannotwait #sdg4action
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We live in a world in which one in nine people are undernourished. That’s We live in a world in which one in nine people are undernourished. That’s about 11% of the world’s population, or 795 million people.

This is a problem for a range of reasons. Foremost, it’s unjust. In a world of our wealth, everyone should be able to get the nutrition they need to live healthy lives. Ensuring people are well-nourished is also vital to the health and development of children – and to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals’ vision of a world without poverty and with dignity for all.

Malnourishment can compromise immune systems, delay cognitive development, stunt growth, cause pregnancy complications, and so much more. The good news is we have solutions to help people around the world get the nourishment they need to survive and thrive. And through the Sustainable Development Goals, the international community has agreed to work toward an end of malnutrition in the world by 2030.
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#DidYouKnow that 289,000 children/year die from diarrhoea diseases caused by poor #WASH? @WASHwatch #FactFriday #SDG3
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Across the globe, women make up a large part of agricultural labor: In Sub-Saharan Africa in 2015, they represented 40 % of the agricultural labor force. In some developing countries, their contributions exceed 50%. Closing the gender gap could increase yields on women-run farms by 20-30%. This could raise total agricultural output in developing countries by 2.5- 4%.

When women are linked to agricultural value chains from production all the way to processing and marketing, they help make traditional farming more productive and commercially viable. Inclusive value chains also offer work opportunities for women and men off the farm. #endingpoverty #SDG3 #SustainableDev #zerohunger #Agenda2030
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DAPP Zambia is increasing access to clean water in the lacking and dry parts of Zambia. This is done through mainstreaming water, sanitation and hygiene education in Monze district of Zambia by covering 164 villages with a combined population of approximately 44,300 people.

The current evidence indicates that water scarcity affects more than 40 per cent of the global population and is projected to rise. Drought afflicts some of the world’s poorest countries, worsening hunger and malnutrition. Sub-Saharan Africa and Zambia specifically are in need of support to ensure access to water and sanitation for all – Sustainable Development Goal 6. #SDG6 #accesstowaterandsanitation #WorldWaterreport #sustainabledevelopment 
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Poverty can push girls into age-disparate relationships, a driver of HIV risk for young women and adolescent girls. For example, in South Africa, 34% of sexually active adolescent girls report being in a relationship with a man at least five years their senior. Such relationships expose young woman and girls to unsafe sexual behaviours, low condom use and increased risk of sexually transmitted infection.

Humana People to People is implementing a DREAMS program in South Africa. The program is working to reduce HIV infection among Adolescent Girls and Young Women of South in Gauteng and Kwazul Natal provinces. Girls whose age group falls in the bracket of 10 – 19 years and young women who are 20 – 24 years including the male sexually active aged 25 – 49 years are the targeted key population. #DREAMS #SDG3 #EndAIDSby2030 #AGYW
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Humana People to People find it sad that the inequalities between boys and girls in school start early, particularly in the poorest countries– for instance, many girls are forced to stay home because they need to work to make enough money to eat their next meal; as another example, once girls hit puberty, they might not attend school due to a lack of access to sanitation facilities.

As an organization, Humana People to People mainstream gender equality in most of its development programs to change the unfortunate circumstances that is arresting most girls potential to escape poverty in developing countries mostly in Sub-Saharan Africa and India. Not only are these girls missing out on opportunities to fulfil their highest potential, but they are more vulnerable as a result.

The Humana Step-Up education project in India is helping girls from economically challenged families to not fall out of schooling but support retention of girls in primary schooling. Girls out of school are more likely to become child brides, are more vulnerable to diseases like HIV and are more likely to die young. #SustainabledevelopmentGoals #Agenda2030 #EveryGirlCounts #GenderEquality 
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