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Kevin Janak
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26 followers
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Excellent article
Don't miss this week's article from our archive! Paul Krugman explains why businesspeople don’t necessarily make great economists.
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Athletchics
Athletchics
athletchic.com
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Absolutely LOVE this app.  Makes both my Android phone and tablet run more smoothly and seamlessly.  Excellent design and functionality.  More please with it as I continue to use it - HIGHLY recommend to those who want a fast UI that is highly customizable and makes your device feel as fast as it should feel.
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Good article on being wary of tech stocks and alternate valuations.
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We need a quantum model for snacks...
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Consider growing your own instead of buying, or checking where they may be from, especially in Europe.
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Great pic
Find out how to photograph and share this weekend's #supermoon with our Your Shot Community: http://on.natgeo.com/12UQy4G (Photo by Quynh Ton)
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A good reminder for keeping electronic means of communication in a good perspective to avoid missing out on authentic relationship
Diminished substitutes
"Most of our communication technologies began as diminished substitutes for an impossible activity. We couldn’t always see one another face to face, so the telephone made it possible to keep in touch at a distance. One is not always home, so the answering machine made a kind of interaction possible without the person being near his phone. Online communication originated as a substitute for telephonic communication, which was considered, for whatever reasons, too burdensome or inconvenient. And then texting, which facilitated yet faster, and more mobile, messaging. These inventions were not created to be improvements upon face-to-face communication, but a declension of acceptable, if diminished, substitutes for it.

But then a funny thing happened: We began to prefer the diminished substitutes. It’s easier to make a phone call than to schlep to see someone in person. Leaving a message on someone’s machine is easier than having a phone conversation — you can say what you need to say without a response; hard news is easier to leave; it’s easier to check in without becoming entangled. So we began calling when we knew no one would pick up.

Shooting off an e-mail is easier, still, because one can hide behind the absence of vocal inflection, and of course there’s no chance of accidentally catching someone. And texting is even easier, as the expectation for articulateness is further reduced, and another shell is offered to hide in. Each step “forward” has made it easier, just a little, to avoid the emotional work of being present, to convey information rather than humanity.

The problem with accepting — with preferring — diminished substitutes is that over time, we, too, become diminished substitutes. People who become used to saying little become used to feeling little."

More:
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/09/opinion/sunday/how-not-to-be-alone.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all&

Illustration by João Fazenda/New York Times
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