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Kenneth Mcleod
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once a student, then a teacher, now I work on my own compositions
once a student, then a teacher, now I work on my own compositions

513 followers
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Kenneth Mcleod's posts

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Night-blooming jasmine. One of the great joys of California. Such a wonderful fragrance.
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What is the end of samsara? How do we get there? Jigmé Lingpa's dzogchen poem offers a possibility. http://tinyurl.com/kqhfolr

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http://reflectionsoninfinitespace.blogspot.com/2015/02/verse-311-another-letting-go.html Ever more subtle aspects of letting go and doing nothing. Coming to the end of Jigmé Lingpa's dzogchen poem.

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The next verse in Jigmé Lingpa's poem on dzogchen practice. Duke Hwan had the same problem with his wheelwright. http://reflectionsoninfinitespace.blogspot.com/2015/01/verse-310-losing-your-way.html

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The heart of the matter. In just four lines, Jigmé Lingpa clarifies the essential instruction in the Heart Drop tradition of Dzogchen. http://tinyurl.com/nmunqhp

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Latest verse and commentary in this poem on dzogchen. When we are able to do nothing, there is nothing to oppose. Whose life is it, then? http://reflectionsoninfinitespace.blogspot.com/2015/01/verse-37-letting-go-of-practice.html

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The idea that… we’re still fated by indifferent gods, feels to us antiquated and superstitious… But instead of the old gods, The Wire is a Greek tragedy in which the postmodern institutions are the Olympian forces. It’s the police department, or the drug economy, or the political structures, or the school administration, or the macroeconomic forces that are throwing the lightning bolts… In much of television, and in a good deal of our stage drama, individuals are often portrayed as rising above institutions to achieve catharsis. In this drama, the institutions always prove larger, and those characters with hubris enough to challenge the postmodern construct of American empire are invariably mocked, marginalised, or crushed. Greek tragedy for the new millennium, so to speak.

http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/art-books/wire-greek-tragedy-optimism/

The technologies that have advanced since the seventies are mainly either medical technologies or information technologies—largely, technologies of simulation. They are technologies of what Jean Baudrillard and Umberto Eco called the “hyper-real,” the ability to make imitations that are more realistic than originals. The postmodern sensibility, the feeling that we had somehow broken into an unprecedented new historical period in which we understood that there is nothing new; that grand historical narratives of progress and liberation were meaningless; that everything now was simulation, ironic repetition, fragmentation, and pastiche—all this makes sense in a technological environment in which the only breakthroughs were those that made it easier to create, transfer, and rearrange virtual projections of things that either already existed, or, we came to realize, never would. Surely, if we were vacationing in geodesic domes on Mars or toting about pocket-size nuclear fusion plants or telekinetic mind-reading devices no one would ever have been talking like this. The postmodern moment was a desperate way to take what could otherwise only be felt as a bitter disappointment and to dress it up as something epochal, exciting, and new.

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The technologies that have advanced since the seventies are mainly either medical technologies or information technologies—largely, technologies of simulation. They are technologies of what Jean Baudrillard and Umberto Eco called the “hyper-real,” the ability to make imitations that are more realistic than originals. The postmodern sensibility, the feeling that we had somehow broken into an unprecedented new historical period in which we understood that there is nothing new; that grand historical narratives of progress and liberation were meaningless; that everything now was simulation, ironic repetition, fragmentation, and pastiche—all this makes sense in a technological environment in which the only breakthroughs were those that made it easier to create, transfer, and rearrange virtual projections of things that either already existed, or, we came to realize, never would. Surely, if we were vacationing in geodesic domes on Mars or toting about pocket-size nuclear fusion plants or telekinetic mind-reading devices no one would ever have been talking like this. The postmodern moment was a desperate way to take what could otherwise only be felt as a bitter disappointment and to dress it up as something epochal, exciting, and new.

http://tinyurl.com/dx629qm

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Very good piece on imbalances in today's world, David Brook's at his best. http://tinyurl.com/bojuhvz
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