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Alvin Alvrez
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Martial arts girl taking down male opponent...
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Just an awesome picture I took.
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Heh..
A cowboy named Mark was overseeing his herd in a remote mountainous pasture in California when suddenly a brand-new BMW advanced toward him out of a cloud of dust.

The driver, a young man in a Brioni suit, Gucci shoes, RayBan sunglasses and YSL tie, leaned out the window and asked the cowboy, “If I tell you exactly how many cows and calves you have in your herd, Will you give me a calf?”

Mark looks at the man, then looks at his peacefully grazing herd and calmly answers, “Sure, Why not?”

The man parks his car, whips out his Dell notebook computer, connects it to his iPhone, and surfs to a NASA page on the Internet, where he calls up a GPS satellite to get an exact fix on his location, which he then feeds to another NASA satellite that scans the area in an ultra-high-resolution photo.

The young man then opens the digital photo in Adobe Photoshop and exports it to an image processing facility in Hamburg , Germany. Within seconds, he receives an email on his iPhone that the image has been processed and the data stored. He then accesses an MS-SQL database through an ODBC connected Excel spreadsheet with email on his iPhone and, after a few minutes, receives a response.

Finally, he prints out a full-color, 150-page report on his hi-tech, miniaturized HP LaserJet printer, turns to the cowboy and says, “You have exactly 1,586 cows and calves.”

“That’s right. Well, I guess you can take one of my calves,” says Mark.

He watches the young man select one of the animals and looks on with amusement as the young man stuffs it into the trunk of his car.

Then Mark says to the young man, “Hey, if I can tell you exactly what your business is, will you give me back my calf?”

The young man thinks about it for a second and then says, “Okay, why not?”

“You’re a Congressman”, says Mark.
“Wow! That’s correct,” says the man, “but how did you guess that?”

“No guessing required.” answered the cowboy. “You showed up here even though nobody called you; you want to get paid for an answer I already knew, to a question I never asked. You used thousands of dollars worth of equipment trying to show me how much smarter you are than I am; and you don’t know a thing about how working people make a living – or about cows, for that matter. This is a herd of sheep. ….

Now give me back my dog.
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Why The New Macbook Pro's Repair Problems Matter

Kyle Wiens at iFixit and Wired took apart the new Macbook Pro the other day, and he was dismayed by what he saw. This was the least repairable laptop he had ever encountered. Apple had soldered together just about everything it could, glued the battery to the frame and presented the display as a single, expensive piece.
In a column in Wired today, Wiens compares the new Macbook Pro to the Macbook Air, which sacrificed upgradeability and reparability in pursuit of thinness and sold millions as a result. The success of this model, he argues, has broad consequences for the industry, and the environment:
The success of the non-upgradeable Air empowered Apple to release the even-less-serviceable iPad two years later: The battery was glued into the case. And again, we voted with our wallets and purchased the device despite its built-in death clock. In the next iteration of the iPad, the glass was fused to the frame.
For products like the iPhone, the iPad, and now the Macbook pro, the marketing strategy is all about magic. These are not collections of electronics in a case, it says, these are whole, perfect units that serve as conduits to a world of possibility. At least, until they break and the next unit comes out. Then they’re pathetic dinosaurs.
For Apple, planned obsolescence is like a religion — it’s able to do that because it makes fantastic products that people want, and it’s a master of hype and ceremony. Its products are very expensive, but it sells to people that want the intellectual ease that comes with having a smooth, shiny Apple product. I don’t spend a lot of time upgradeing my computers or thinking about what’s inside of them, and for consumers like me, Apple is perfect.
It isn’t that Apple has no upgradeable products, argues Wiens. It’s that consumers have overwhelmingly chosen to support thinner, easier products over more durable and powerful ones. Apple is applying this principle to the new Macbook Pro.
It’s not surprising – for years, Apple has profited from taking the tangled mess of electronics that constituted computers and presenting them in easily understandable products. This is the natural outcome of that process. For Wiens, support for products like this encourage the disposability of high-end electronics.
Every time we buy a locked down product containing a non-replaceable battery with a finite cycle count, we’re v …

http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidthier/2012/06/15/planned-obsolescence-apples-new-macbook-pro-isnt-built-to-last/
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