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Why do schools require back-to-school physicals each year?
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, schools often require physicals to ensure students’ vaccinations are up-to-date. These exams also provide an opportunity to monitor a child’s health on a year-to-year basis to ensure he or she is hitting milestone benchmarks.

For more information on physical exams for your child, visit http://ow.ly/RhZ3T.
Starting the School Year on a Healthy Note
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What can my child expect during a back-to-school visit or well-exam?
During a back-to-school physical, doctors discuss the child’s history and any concerns, ask questions about lifestyle behaviors, check his or her vaccination status and update personal and family medical history. Doctors also will check the child’s vital signs — blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate and temperature — and perform heart, lung, abdominal and head and neck exams. They will also monitor the child’s neurological responses, perform a dermatological exam by looking at skin and nails, and check extremities for physical and sensory changes.

Have you scheduled your child’s annual physical? For a referral to a Barnabas Health pediatrician, visit http://ow.ly/QSfai.
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Learn about the different types of and treatments for psoriasis.
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Back to School, Safely
Starting the School Year on a Healthy Note

While back-to-school is a time to shop for school supplies and the latest fashions, it also is the perfect time to check in on your child’s health with a physical exam.

Children’s and teens’ bodies and minds are constantly changing, so it is important to monitor their growth, health and development to safeguard against potential problems. Barnabas Health pediatric specialists share answers to the following common questions related to back-to-school physicals:

Are well-visits, physical exams and sports exams the same thing?
Each of these exams is classified as a preventative care visit — they allow the child to be examined using measurements of growth and development. These visits help keep the child healthy and focus on improvements that can be made to enhance the child’s wellness.

What can my child expect during a back-to-school visit or well-exam?
During a back-to-school physical, doctors discuss the child’s history and any concerns, ask questions about lifestyle behaviors, check his or her vaccination status and update personal and family medical history. Doctors also will check the child’s vital signs — blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate and temperature — and perform heart, lung, abdominal and head and neck exams. They will also monitor the child’s neurological responses, perform a dermatological exam by looking at skin and nails, and check extremities for physical and sensory changes.

Why do schools require back-to-school physicals each year?
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, schools often require physicals to ensure students’ vaccinations are up-to-date. These exams also provide an opportunity to monitor a child’s health on a year-to-year basis to ensure he or she is hitting milestone benchmarks.

What vaccines are required for school-age children?
New Jersey schools require specific immunizations based on the child’s age. For a full list of vaccinations required for preschool/child care, school and college entry in New Jersey, visit http://nj.gov/health/cd/imm.shtml.

Does my child need any other kind of screening?
Cardiac and concussion screenings have the lifesaving potential to reduce heart-related incidents and brain injuries among school-age children and teens. New Jersey requires all school athletes to be examined by their primary care or school physician at least once a year, and free screening programs are available throughout the year at select locations.
The Barnabas Health Matthew J. Morahan III Health Assessment Center for Athletes provides statewide education, evaluation and assessment of sports injury and sports-related cardiac and concussion screenings. For information about upcoming screenings, call 973-322-7913.


For a referral to a Barnabas Health pediatric specialist, call 1-888-724-7123.
Communicable Disease Service, New Jersey Department of Health
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Life does not stop when you have heart failure. The following five tips can help to improve your quality of life, whether you’re living with heart failure or trying to protect your heart from damage.
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Today, the entire state is under a heat advisory, with the heat index approaching or exceeding 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Please remember to check on your elderly neighbors and pets, limit your time outdoors, and recognize the symptoms of heat illness:
http://ow.ly/PQd3C
In order to beat the heat, it's important to look out for your health and the health of those around you.
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Barnabas Health and Robert Wood Johnson Health System Sign Agreement ow.ly/PBsLJ
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Exercise Ideas for Older Adults

Finding ways to get exercise as you get older is a smart and easy way to stay fit and improve your health. Exercise is just as important in your older years as when you were younger.

Research shows that an exercise routine offers a wealth of health benefits. One study found that adults, ages 75 and older, who exercised lived longer than older adults who didn't exercise. Another study discovered that older women who scheduled resistance, or strength, training workouts each week improved their cognitive function.

It’s also well known that regular exercise can help to boost heart health, maintain a healthy body weight, keep joints flexible and healthy, and improve balance to reduce falls.

Exercise does not take as much time as you may think. For general health benefits, older adults need about 2½ hours of aerobic (walking, running, and other activities that get the heart pumping faster) activity per week. These activities should be combined with activities that strengthen muscles at least 2 days per week.

Joining a gym and making use of the machines, trainers, and classes is one way to exercise. But you can also have fun there, meet new people, and do a variety of different activities that keep you healthy and strong.


Easy ways to exercise

Exercise actually comes in many forms, including activities that feel more like fun than hard work:
-Dance. Sign up for a dance class with your spouse or a friend or carve out some dance time at home.
-Go bowling. Join a bowling league or make a weekly date with some of your friends. If you have grandchildren, bring them along.
- Rediscover a favorite sport. Whether you love the elegance of golf or the challenge of tennis, make time for these leisure activities. If possible, vary your activities over the course of each week to work different muscle groups.
-Enjoy the great outdoors. When the weather cooperates, ride your bike, visit a local park for a hike, or simply go for a walk. These are all great exercises that get you outside and into the fresh air.
- Get in the swim. Swimming is an excellent exercise choice, particularly if you have arthritis joint pain. Join a local fitness center with a pool. Work in regular swims to meet your cardiovascular needs without straining your joints.


Balance and strengthening count, too

To help prevent falls, you also want to practice exercises that improve your balance. Yoga and tai chi fit the bill. They will also help you manage stress, feel more relaxed, and improve muscle tone. Yoga or tai chi classes are widely available in many areas, from senior centers to the Y.

Taking some time to stretch every day can also help keep your joints flexible and keep you moving well. It’s also important to lift some light weights. Canned goods from your cupboard are a fine substitute. You can also use a resistance band to tone your muscles.


Work out while you work

Add a little “elbow grease” when doing chores and these regular activities will count as a workout:
-Cleaning the house
- Raking leaves in the yard
- Gardening
- Mowing the lawn
- Sweeping and dusting

Remember that getting older doesn't mean slowing down. You've got to keep moving to stay young at heart…as well as in mind, body, and spirit.

For more information about staying well as an older adult, visit the Barnabas Health online Health Library at http://goo.gl/GyDAvZ.
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While getting bug bites is a summer rite of passage, you can reduce the itching, swelling and pain that come along with mosquito, chigger, tick bites and more by following these tips.
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With all the different back-to-school checkups, many parents ask “are well-visits, physical exams and sports exams the same thing?”

Each of these exams is classified as a preventative care visit — they allow the child to be examined using measurements of growth and development. These visits help keep the child healthy and focus on improvements that can be made to enhance the child's wellness.

For a referral to a Barnabas Health pediatrician, visit http://ow.ly/QIDj4.
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Did you know exercise helps fight breast cancer?
To learn more about breast cancer, including preventive screenings, understanding your diagnosis, deciding on treatment and more, visit http://ow.ly/QA9wV.
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