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J. Amy Belaire, Christopher J. Whelan, and Emily S. Minor 2014. Having our yards and sharing them too: the collective effects of yards on native bird species in an urban landscape. Ecological Applications 24:2132–2143. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/13-2259.1
It's hard to manage residential yards as wildlife habitat, but if it can be done, then birds stand to benefit.
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“Perceived scientific consensus acts as a key gateway belief for both Democrats and Republicans,” wrote the authors. Interestingly, the paper found that the consensus message was particularly effective with Republicans — a group that, in general, is not easily swayed on the climate issue.
They argue that telling people that 97 percent of scientists agree on climate is the key to broader acceptance.
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Despite proof of the scientific consensus Republicans repeatedly reject it for this issue. It is not just consensus -- it is an economic and policy issue -- no one wants to invest or change the current situation if we aren't sure about this. It costs to much; they are not yet willing to take the financial risk.
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They are two different species from different places, and yet somehow they get together to make this hybrid.

The team's DNA analysis confirming the odd coupling is published in the March edition of the journal The American Naturalist.
Two species of fern that diverged 60 million years ago are as evolutionarily distant as, say, elephants and manatees. Nonetheless, the two species recently produced a hybrid, say astounded botanists.
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NatureNet Science Fellow Joleah Lamb: bit.ly/1LQ57e8

Learn how Joleah Lamb is tackling one of Earth’s biggest unsung problems: disease & coral #reefs .

NatureNet Fellow Joleah Lamb loves to sail, loves the ocean. So of course she loves to study coral reefs for…wait, why again?

“Disease,” says Lamb with a laugh. “I always loved the ocean, but I also have what might be considered an abiding — but ghoulish — interest in disease. ”

Seem counterintuitive? It won’t when you learn that coral is being decimated by disease worldwide — nasty stuff like white band disease that can kill or cripple corals. Lamb, though, lit up at the prospect of researching this stuff.

“It was like something clicked for me,” says Lamb, a former clinical researcher for pharmaceutical companies who also studied neurobiology as an undergrad at the University of Oregon. “I hate to say it was my lucky day because disease is awful, but I suddenly had everything I loved to study and learn about in one place.”

#science  
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Sagebrush ecosystem recovery appears to be hobbled by loss of soil complexity when topsoil is remixed at oil and gas development sites, losing the “islands of fertility” associated with mature shrubs.
Sagebrush ecosystem recovery appears to be hobbled by loss of soil complexity when topsoil is remixed at oil and gas development sites, losing the "islands of
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Couple's research plants seeds for reclamation of sagebrush

Tamera Minnick and Rich Alward on the front page of the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel with a story about their January report in Ecological Applications.

Plant–soil feedbacks and the partial recovery of soil spatial patterns on abandoned well pads in a sagebrush shrubland. 2015 Ecological Applications 25:3–10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/13-1698.1
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Have them in circles
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"But it's not all rough-and-tumble, strangulation and arm removal..."
Octopuses are thoroughly antisocial. Yet for some reason they have evolved to mate in the most intimate way possible
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"Listening to his story was the first time I became acutely aware that the intellectual rigors of my scientific training did not prepare me for the strong bouts of emotions that come with research that has immediate meaning in people’s lives. "
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ABSTRACTS due TODAY
#ESA100 annual meeting

deadline: 5:00 PM Eastern Standard Time

contributed talks, posters, and lightening talks (new format!)

FAQ: http://esa.org/baltimore/info/faq/

Direct link to submission form: http://eco.confex.com/eco/2015/cfp.cgi

Hope to see you all in Baltimore this August!
These deadlines are for individual presentations. For session proposals please refer to the Session deadlines. If you're not sure which abstract category applies to you it's most likely Contributed Abstracts. Abstract Type, Call Open, Submission Deadline, Acceptance Notification, Scheduling ...
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When closely related animal species live in the same place, what keeps them apart?
*Guest post by Santiago J. Sánchez-Pacheco Closely related animal species are often so similar that it is hard to distinguish them. This immediately leads to the question of how the individuals of such species, when in sym...
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Work of a pack rat, or as I like to call them, desert beavers. This must be a rodent mansion!
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EDITORIAL

Grand Junction scientists Tamera Minnick and Rich Alward recently completed a soil study that found former oil and gas well pads in Rio Blanco County lacked pockets of fertile soil that occur naturally in sagebrush habitat.
Grand Junction - Appearances can be deceiving. Sometimes you have go beneath the surface to discover the truth about something. That seems to be the case
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Have them in circles
161 people
Sustainable Forests Roundtable's profile photo
Eclipse Awards's profile photo
Brian Gauspohl's profile photo
Elizabeth Lester's profile photo
Biocultural Diversity & Land(Sea)scapes's profile photo
Erin Dummer's profile photo
Georgi Stankov's profile photo
Mark Hovenden's profile photo
Margaret Eisenberger's profile photo
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The largest professional society of ecological scientists, founded 1915.
Introduction
The Ecological Society of America is the world’s largest community of professional ecologists and a trusted source of ecological knowledge. ESA is committed to advancing the understanding of life on Earth. The 10,000 member Society publishes five journals, convenes an annual scientific conference, and broadly shares ecological information through policy and media outreach and education initiatives. Visit our blog for ESA news and events.