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Ecological Society of America
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Science Communicators! 
There's still time to add Workshop 10854: Communicating Science Vividly; Sunday, August 9, 2015; 12:00-5:00 p.m. 
to your #ESA100 schedule.

Our workshop targets ecologists, educators, and communicators – those looking to expand their toolbox, and those curious to test the waters of science communication for the first time.
We’re not looking for journalistic masterpieces, and everyone is welcome.

In this workshop, ‘boundary-spanning’ science communicators with expertise in visual communication and creative nonfiction writing will guide participants through a variety of hands-on exercises to build their skills in conveying ecological concepts to broad audiences.
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The siren song of a sticky plant: columbines provision mutualist arthropods by attracting and killing passerby insects. (in press) Eric F. LoPresti, Ian Seth Pearse, and Grace K. Charles #Ecology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/15-0342.1
It’s not only carnivorous plants that bugs have to watch out for. Sure, if an ant tumbles into a pitcher plant or a spider stands in the open maw of a Venus flytrap, we know what’s coming next. But certain innocent-looking plants—perhaps very many of them, even including ones in your own yard—murder hosts of insects that they have no …
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And the Narwhal too -
How adaptable are narwhal? A comparison of foraging patterns among the world's three narwhal populations.
C. A. Watt, M. P. Heide-Jørgensen, and S. H. Ferguson (2013). 
#Ecosphere 4:art71.
http://www.esajournals.org/doi/full/10.1890/ES13-00137.1
A new study shows that bumblebee habitat is shrinking due to climate change. How are other animals reacting to a changing world?
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A guest post by Mary Evelyn Tucker, Co-Director of the Forum on Religion and Ecology at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Tucker wrote and
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NSF has a new toolkit for communicating your science
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"But it's not all rough-and-tumble, strangulation and arm removal..."
Octopuses are thoroughly antisocial. Yet for some reason they have evolved to mate in the most intimate way possible
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In their circles
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168 people
Ken Nugent's profile photo
Michelle Gibson's profile photo
I fucking love biodiversity's profile photo
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Outgoing ESA President David Inouye on the ecology needed for the next 100 years -- as we celebrate #ESA100

"The science of ecology is about relationships—among organisms and habitats, on all scales—and how they provide information that helps us better understand our world. In the past 100 years, the field has moved from observations to experiments to forecasting. Next week, the Ecological Society of America (ESA), the world's largest ecological society, celebrates its centennial in Baltimore, an opportunity to reflect on the field's past and future. "
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New #Ecosphere paper out today from OSU researchers Garrett W. Meigs, John L. Campbell, Harold S. J. Zald, John D. Bailey, David C. Shaw, and Robert E. Kennedy
Does wildfire likelihood increase following insect outbreaks in conifer forests? Ecosphere 6:art118–art118. (2015) http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES15-00037.1
CORVALLIS, Ore. – As mountain pine beetles and other insects chew their way through Western forests, forest fires might not seem far behind. Lands covered by dead trees appear ready to burst into flame. However, an analysis of wildfire extent in Oregon and Washington over the past 30 years shows ...
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#ESAFrontiers  
Reconciling predator conservation with public safety.
Francesco Ferretti, Salvador Jorgensen, Taylor K Chapple, Giulio De Leo, and Fiorenza Micheli. (In press). 
+Stanford University +Monterey Bay Aquarium
California may be plagued by earthquakes, brush fires and a record-breaking drought. But here’s one way life has gotten better in the Golden State: The risk of being attacked by a shark has plunged.
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Student leaders of ESA's award winning Strategies For Ecology Education, Diversity And Sustainability Program (SEEDS) get a tour of Pollination Science, Communication, and Policy on their visit to the Washington DC area.
This year, we learned a lot about pollinators, especially native bees, bumble bees and honey bees at the 2015 SEEDS Leadership Meeting in North End, Md.
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J. Amy Belaire, Christopher J. Whelan, and Emily S. Minor 2014. Having our yards and sharing them too: the collective effects of yards on native bird species in an urban landscape. Ecological Applications 24:2132–2143. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/13-2259.1
It's hard to manage residential yards as wildlife habitat, but if it can be done, then birds stand to benefit.
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“Perceived scientific consensus acts as a key gateway belief for both Democrats and Republicans,” wrote the authors. Interestingly, the paper found that the consensus message was particularly effective with Republicans — a group that, in general, is not easily swayed on the climate issue.
They argue that telling people that 97 percent of scientists agree on climate is the key to broader acceptance.
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Despite proof of the scientific consensus Republicans repeatedly reject it for this issue. It is not just consensus -- it is an economic and policy issue -- no one wants to invest or change the current situation if we aren't sure about this. It costs to much; they are not yet willing to take the financial risk.
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People
In their circles
146 people
Have them in circles
168 people
Ken Nugent's profile photo
Michelle Gibson's profile photo
I fucking love biodiversity's profile photo
Brian Ray James (Brian)'s profile photo
Andrew Rogers's profile photo
Fundly - Online Fundraising's profile photo
Joshua Konkankoh's profile photo
Erin Dummer's profile photo
Sonia Herrero Ortega's profile photo
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The largest professional society of ecological scientists, founded 1915.
Introduction
The Ecological Society of America is the world’s largest community of professional ecologists and a trusted source of ecological knowledge. ESA is committed to advancing the understanding of life on Earth. The 10,000 member Society publishes five journals, convenes an annual scientific conference, and broadly shares ecological information through policy and media outreach and education initiatives. Visit our blog for ESA news and events.