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Marian Filo (SUPRATRADE)
Lives in Chamonix, France
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A genetic mutation responsible for a debilitating childhood neurological condition known as Aicardi syndrome has been identified by researchers. They identified mutations to a gene known as TEAD1, which not only affects formation of the brain but also the retina, the part of the eye responsible for helping turn light into nerve impulses.
"These findings are of clinical importance because they demonstrate AIC linked to autosomal mutations, and therefore for the first time rule-in a likely much higher frequency of AIC in boys," said Dr. Isabelle Schrauwen, a Research Assistant Professor in Dr. Matt Huentelman's lab and the lead ...
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The team, led by Thirumala-Devi Kanneganti, Ph.D., a member of the St. Jude Department of Immunology, published their findings in a recent issue of the journal Cell. She said that the findings could have important applications for prevention, prognosis and treatment.
Scientists at St. Jude discovered how an immune system protein called AIM2 plays a role in determining the aggressiveness of colon cancer.
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Scientists for the first time tracked ultrafast structural changes, captured in quadrillionths-of-a-second steps, as ring-shaped gas molecules burst open and unraveled. Ring-shaped molecules are abundant in biochemistry and also form the basis for many drug compounds. The study points the way to a wide range of real-time X-ray studies of gas-based chemical reactions that are vital to biological processes.
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Before there were cells on Earth, simple, tiny catalysts most likely evolved the ability to speed up and synchronize the chemical reactions necessary for life to rise from the primordial soup. But what those catalysts were, how they appeared at the same time, and how they evolved into the two modern superfamilies of enzymes that translate our genetic code have not been understood.
UNC School of Medicine researchers provide first direct experimental evidence for the rapid synthesis of two classes of proteins necessary to create the first life on Earth.
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Kangaroos prefer to use one of their hands over the other for everyday tasks in much the same way that humans do, with one notable difference: generally speaking, kangaroos are lefties. The finding is the first to consider handedness in wild kangaroos, and challenges the notion that 'true' handedness among mammals is a feature unique to primates.
Here's an interesting bit of information for your next trivia night: by and large, kangaroos are left-handed. This might seem like really weird news, but the study that backs this up may help...
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New research helps elucidate how bats actually fly to find their prey. Every night a bat puts in 600-700 kilometres of airtime. Flying low, the animals catch insects at speeds of around 40 metres per second. At night the bat uses its hearing to navigate its way to prey. Bats catch insects continuously using echolocation, an advanced navigation system.
Bats fly at night to avoid being eaten by birds of prey. Despite poor visibility, darkness and ambient noise, bats capture their prey with amazing precision.
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High prevalence of sleep disturbances, undiagnosed sleep apnea among racial/ethnic minorities may contribute to health disparities
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A new study is helping to shed light on latent tuberculosis and the bacteria's ability to hide in stem cells. Some bone marrow stem cells reside in low oxygen (hypoxia) zones.
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Colliding lead ions at the Large Hadron Collider creates tiny samples of matter at energy densities that have not occurred since microseconds after the Big Bang. At these densities, ordinary matter melts into its primordial constituents of quarks and gluons. To explore the properties of this plasma of quarks and gluons as it expands and cools, a new Di-Jet Calorimeter was installed at the collider.
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A group of researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have managed to print and dry three-dimensional objects made entirely by cellulose for the first time with the help of a 3D-bioprinter. They also added carbon nanotubes to create electrically conductive material. The effect is that cellulose and other raw material based on wood will be able to compete with fossil-based plastics and metals in the on-going additive manufacturing revolution, which started with the introduction of the 3D-printer.
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Researchers have developed a material suited for photovoltaics. For the first time, a functioning organic solar cell consisting of a single component has been produced on the basis of metal-organic framework compounds (MOFs). The material is highly elastic and might also be used for the flexible coating of clothes and deformable components.
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Chemists have developed a major improvement to capture and retain energy from sunlight, where the stored energy can last dramatically longer than current solar technology allows -- up to several weeks, instead of the microseconds found in today's rooftop solar panels.
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