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César Díaz
22,228 followers -
Expecting something big from G+
Expecting something big from G+

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New phone with better Android. Malware protection included and cache cleaning feature. 

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I've been playing n-back, stroop task and others for years to get rid of sensory modulation disorder. They work well, especially at concentration that allows me to read books onscreen. 
Video Game Promotes Better Attention Skills in Some Children with Sensory Processing Dysfunction

A video game under development as a medical device boosts attention in some children with sensory processing dysfunction, or SPD, a condition that can make the sound of a vacuum, or contact with a clothing tag intolerable for young sufferers.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

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Liked this?
Check +Jessica Meyer​

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From +Jessica Meyer​
Using AI for conservation prompts elucidation of the meaning of conservation. "Exploring hypothetical futures tell us a lot about the concerns of the present. That's science-fiction in a nutshell. Ex Machina, System Shock, and Neuromancer aren't how-to manuals; in their visions of robotic rebellion, they reflect our fears about our own fallibilities. So what happens when we speculate about AI going green instead of going rogue? That tells us something about how the ethical questions that pervade modern conservation, about how we see our role in protecting our remaining wilderness, and about what 'wild' even means."

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"Genetic details of controversial 'three-parent baby' revealed." A US fertility clinic revealed last year that it had created a baby boy using a controversial technique that mixes DNA from three people. The team "removed the nucleus from a healthy donor egg and replaced it with a nucleus taken from the egg cell of a woman who carries a rare neurological disease called Leigh syndrome, leaving the donor's healthy mitochondria intact. The scientists then fertilized the modified egg with the father's sperm before implanting it into the mother's uterus. The resulting baby was born in April 2016."

"The paper reports new details about the procedure, such as the method used to transfer the mitochondria: freezing and heating the embryo before using an electrical pulse to fuse the mother's nucleus into the donor egg. The study also reveals that some diseased DNA from the mother was carried over inadvertently into the donor egg, which could have long-term repercussions for the child's health."

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