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Flower Art & Soul
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Features about planting flowers.Bulk flower seeds and seed for wedding favors
Features about planting flowers.Bulk flower seeds and seed for wedding favors

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One of the biggest mistakes we all make is planting seeds too deep. The rule of thumb (to which there are exceptions) is to plant seeds only as deep as the size of the seed. In many cases that means just covering the seed with soil as oposed to digging a hole and dropping it in. Having said that there are a number of seeds that require light to germinate. Here is a partial list of seed that should be just sowed on the surface:

Yarrow English Daisy
Purple Coneflower
Indian Blanket and Blanket Flower
Hollyhock Four O'Clock
Primrose Black Eye Susan
Mexican Sunflower.
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Spring is coming. Well ok maybe a little off in the distance but it's never too early to start dreaming. Why buy in packets when you can get "more than a pinch" for the same price? Share with your neighbors or buy together and save. Premium seeds, germ tested and no re-packaging middle man. Flower Art & Soul is the ticket.
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How cold is it? Depends. While many people can actually think of starting seed indoors the general rule of thumb is is 6 weeks before the last frost. So for most of us it is still too early to start seeds indoors. You can howeaver start thinking about what you might like to plant and where, browse the net for ideas and well, just sit by the fire and wait.....
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Because many of you are now looking through your seeds to figure out what you might want to plant next year here is a short list of how long seeds retain their viability. It is not complete but hopefully will help. I also always thhink that if you have old seed it never hurts to throw it out in the beds. You are almost guaranteed to get one or two plants and the rest is good compost, assuming the birds don't like them!!!!
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Some of the flowers that are blooming now, if they were planted.... Zinnias, Marigolds, Cosmos, Purple Coneflower....if not, maybe next year!!!
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8/17/17
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The following are a few toxic and poisonous flowers so take care when children are present:

Larkspur, Columbine, Butterfly Milkweed (which is why the monarch butterfly lays its eggs on it) Sweet Pea seeds, Foxglove. Lupine is toxic to cattle.
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6/15/17
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Ideas with fresh flowers and food!!!
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4/13/17
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Here is a (long) list of edible flowers that can be used in salads or to decorate cakes etc...... (courtesy of Wikipedia)

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) – Also called Marigolds. A wonderful edible flower. Flavors range from spicy to bitter, tangy to peppery. Their sharp taste resembles saffron (also known as Poor Mans Saffron). Has pretty petals in golden-orange hues. Sprinkle them on soups, pasta or rice dishes, herb butters, and salads. Petals add a yellow tint to soups, spreads, and scrambled eggs. Only the pedals are edible.

Carnations (Dianthus caryophyllus – aka Dianthus) – Carnations can be steeped in wine, candy, or use as cake decoration. To use the surprisingly sweet petals in desserts, cut them away from the bitter white base of the flower. Dianthus are the miniature member of the carnation family with light clove-like or nutmeg scent. Petals add color to salads or aspics. Carnation petals are one of secret ingredients that has been used to make Chartreuse, a French liqueur, since the 17th century.

Chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum coronarium) – Tangy, slightly bitter, ranging in colors from red, white, yellow and orange. They range in taste from faint peppery to mild cauliflower. They sould be blanched first and then scatter the petals on a salad. The leaves can also be used to flavor vinegar. Always remove the bitter flower base and use petals only. Young leaves and stems of the Crown Daisy, also known as Chop Suey Greens or Shingiku in Japan, are widely used in oriental stir-fries and as salad seasoning.

Clover (Trifolium species) – Sweet, anise-like, licorice. White and red clover blossoms were used in folk medicine against gout, rheumatism, and leucorrhea. It was also believed that the texture of fingernails and toenails would improve after drinking clover blossom tea. Native Americans used whole clover plants in salads, and made a white clover leaf tea for coughs and colds. Avoid bitter flowers that are turning brown, and choose those with the brightest color, which are tastiest. Raw flower heads can be difficult to digest.

Cornflower (Centaurea cynaus) – Also called Bachelors button. They have a slightly sweet to spicy, clove-like flavor. Bloom is a natural food dye. More commonly used as garnish.
Dame’s Rocket (Hesperis matronalis) – Also called Sweet Rocket or Dame’s Violet. This plant is often mistaken for Phlox. Phlox has five petals, Dame’s Rocket has just four. The flowers, which resemble phlox, are deep lavender, and sometimes pink to white. The plant is part of the mustard family, which also includes radishes, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and, mustard. The plant and flowers are edible, but fairly bitter. The flowers are attractive added to green salads. The young leaves can also be added to your salad greens (for culinary purposes, the leaves should be picked before the plant flowers). The seed can also be sprouted and added to salads. NOTE: It is not the same variety as the herb commonly called Rocket, which is used as a green in salad
English Daisy (Bellis perennis) – The flowers have a mildly bitter taste and are most commonly used for their looks than their flavor. The petals are used as a garnish and in salads.

Hollyhock (Alcea rosea) – Very bland tasting flavor.
Johnny-Jump-Ups (Viola tricolor) – Lovely yellow, white and purple blooms have a mild wintergreen flavor and can be used in salads, to decorate cakes, or served with soft cheese. They are also a great addition to drinks, soups, desserts or salads.

Marigold (Tagetes tenuifolia – aka T. signata) – The marigold can be used as a substitute for saffron. Also great in salads as they have a citrus flavor.

Nasturtiums Tropaeolum majus) – Comes in varieties ranging from trailing to upright and in brilliant sunset colors with peppery flavors. Nasturtiums rank among most common edible flowers. Blossoms have a sweet,spicy flavor similar to watercress. Stuff whole flowers with savory mousse. Leaves add peppery tang to salads. Pickled seed pods are less expensive substitute for capers. Use entire flowers to garnish platters, salads, cheese tortas, open-faced sandwiches, and savory appetizers.

Pansy FlowerPansy (Viola X wittrockiana) – Pansies have a slightly sweet green or grassy flavor. If you eat only the petals, the flavor is extremely mild, but if you eat the whole flower, there is a winter, green overtone. Use them as garnishes, in fruit salads, green salad, desserts or in soups.

Phlox, Perrennial Phlox (Phlox paniculata) – It is the perennial phlox, NOT the annual, that is edible. It is the high-growing (taller) and not the low-growing (creeping) phlox that grows from 3 to 4 feet tall. Slightly spicy taste. Great in fruit salads. The flowers vary from a Reddish purple to pink, some white.
Sunflower (Helianthus annus) – The flower is best eaten in the bud stage when it tastes similar to artichokes. Once the flower opens, the petals may be used like chrysanthemums, the flavor is distinctly bittersweet. The unopened flower buds can also be steamed like artichokes.

Tulip Petals (Tulipa) – Flavor varies from tulip to tulip, but generally the petals taste like sweet lettuce, fresh baby peas, or a cucumber-like texture and flavor. NOTE: Some people have had strong allergic reactions to them. If touching them causes a rash, numbness etc. Don’t eat them! Don’t eat the bulbs ever. If you have any doubts, don’t eat the flower.

Violets (Viola species) – Sweet, perfumed flavor. Related flowers, Johnny jump-ups or violas, and pansies now come in colorful purples and yellows to apricot and pastel hues. I like to eat the tender leaves and flowers in salads. I also use the flowers to beautifully embellish desserts and iced drinks. Freeze them in punches to delight children and adults alike. All of these flowers make pretty adornments for frosted cakes, sorbets, or any other desserts, and they may be crystallized as well. Heart-shaped leaves are edible, and tasty when cooked like spinach.
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Butterflies rejoice when they spot yarrow (Achillea), a long-blooming perennial with flattened poufs of flowers for them to land on. Gardeners love this plant because it needs little water or maintenance, and even tolerates troublesome clay. Cut back spent flowers to keep it blooming all summer:



Below: Yellow Yarrow (Achillea) mingles well with other perennials in a flower bed. Photograph by Cristina Sanvito via Flickr.
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Funny for the day!
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