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Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication
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Harvard researchers Dr. Mercè Crosas and Dr. Timothy Clark chosen to develop NIH Data Commons platform to facilitate open sharing of large and dynamic datasets, visualizations, and more... http://ow.ly/QVDk30hKapE
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Couldn't make it to our New Genres for Scholarship event? Fear not! You can listen to a recording of our four fantastic panelists here: https://t.co/kI2Xa5O809
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Interested in innovative and hybrid genres of scholarship? A gentle reminder to join the OSC at our New Genres For Scholarship panel discussion on Thursday, 12/7, 10am-12pm in Fong Auditorium (Harvard Yard). Free and open to the public. http://ow.ly/w8uh30h1V9l
New Genres For Scholarship
New Genres For Scholarship
officeforscholarlycommunicationharvardlibrary.createsend.com
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Interested in innovative genres for scholarship across the disciplines? Join the OSC on December 7th for a panel discussion. Free and open to the public. See details here: http://ow.ly/eaMr30grrlG
New Genres For Scholarship
New Genres For Scholarship
officeforscholarlycommunicationharvardlibrary.createsend.com
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Harvard faculty, staff, and students: Interested in making your work open access, but not sure how? See our new FAQ on CV scraping! http://ow.ly/FGaK30gg6tR
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Gamers, we have a trending Harvard DASH paper for you! "Algorithmic Approaches to Playing Minesweeper," by David Becerra. http://ow.ly/sdVp30gfH2f
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Sharing the work of sharing Harvard’s research

In early 2016, the Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC) launched a pilot project to recruit help from around the university to deposit faculty-authored articles in DASH, Harvard’s open-access repository. This project has the full support of the Harvard Library.

In January of this year, the project emerged from the pilot phase, and was officially renamed the Distributed DASH Deposits program, or D3. All Harvard schools have made a start with D3, and the next goal is to scale up.

D3 has two overriding rationales. First, without a distributed system like this one, Harvard simply could not implement the open-access policies adopted by faculty at every Harvard school. No central office, like the OSC, could do this job on its own, even with significantly increased funding or staffing. Second, implementing the open-access policies is worth doing. It benefits Harvard authors, by increasing their audience and impact, and benefits scholars and readers everywhere, by increasing their access to Harvard research.

The D3 work is undertaken by three distinct cadres of helpers: depositors, catalogers, and Copyright First Responders.

Depositors are subject librarians, department administrators, and faculty assistants. They help find new scholarly articles in their subject areas written by Harvard faculty; they obtain the right versions of the files; and they submit those files to the OSC for processing. When the authors have not already signed assistance-authorization forms, they help get their signatures. When the authors do not already have ORCIDs (a standard identifier for publishing scholars), they help them sign up. We have a growing number of depositors, as well as a related group of lookouts, who alert depositors or the OSC to potential new DASH deposits.

Catalogers add and check the metadata for DASH submissions, and identify metadata problems that might arise in the records in the DASH queue. D3 benefits from metadata specialists in Harvard Library Information and Technical Services who work to process DASH records for all participating schools. In 2017, these catalogers have processed hundreds of DASH records and made recommendations to increase the efficiency of D3 itself.

Copyright First Responders are librarians trained in Copyright 101 by Kyle Courtney, OSC’s Copyright Advisor and Program Manager. They vet the licenses on DASH submissions, and determine whether Harvard has permission to make those works open access.

Even in its infancy, D3 is succeeding: it has increased the number of new deposits to DASH, reminded participating schools and authors of the benefits of open access, and positioned DASH as collaborative effort across Harvard University.
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This week, Harvard merges two celebrations: Open Access Week, led by the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC), and the inaugural Worldwide Week, led by the Harvard Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs (VPIA)

These two events aim to raise awareness of Harvard’s reach into the global community of research and education. By connecting them this year, both offices hope to start a new level of cooperation and collaboration.

VPIA’s Worldwide Week showcases Harvard’s global presence and the range of its educational opportunities that extend beyond the Cambridge and Boston campuses.

Open Access Week is marked by an international series of events highlighting open access to research, and promoting it as the new default. Scholarly works in DASH (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard), Harvard’s open-access repository, are freely available to anyone with an internet connection, and have been downloaded more than 13 million times by users from every country on Earth.

DASH receives dozens of messages from readers around the world each week. These “DASH Stories” describe how open access to Harvard scholarship makes a difference in readers’ research or everyday lives. Recently, a reader from South America, provided this feedback: “I am a University lecturer in South America with limited access to academic journals. I wish they all were free to access. I am glad for this initiative, I hope it soon becomes the norm.”

The OSC and VPIA are pleased to work together in supporting their common interests, and highlighting Harvard’s global presence in open access to research and in international educational opportunities.

The OSC hopes you will explore the events on offer during Worldwide Week: https://worldwide.harvard.edu/worldwide-week
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2017 to date has been a record-setting year for DASH, Harvard’s open-access repository. In February, the repository passed the milestone of 10 million total downloads since its launch in 2009. In July it passed the 12 million milestone, and we expect to see over four million downloads in 2017 year alone. We’re on track to deposit over 8,000 articles, conference proceedings, working papers, theses, and dissertations this year, bringing the total inventory of DASH works to 40,000+. There’s no better time to explore the breadth of Harvard’s open-access scholarship in DASH.
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An exciting announcement in advance of Open Access Week 2017: Harvard-China Project on Energy, Economy and Environment has adopted an OA policy. Read the full announcement here: bit.ly/Harvard-China_OA
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