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Community Watch Paper
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Helping to keep you, your family, and your community safe
Helping to keep you, your family, and your community safe

116 followers
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December is a critical month for charities to raise money. In fact, nearly one third of annual giving occurs in December. Scammers are well aware of this, and are out in full force looking to line their own pockets as the year draws to an end.
How It Works:
• Scammers use the same techniques as trusted charities to reach you – in person, by mail, over the phone, online, by text, or by e-mail, so be mindful across all of these methods.
• The name of the fake charity may closely resemble the name of a real charity.
• The fake charity might ask you to wire money or give cash – see this as a red flag.
What You Should Know:
• Real charities need your support, and they, like us, lose out when a scammer intervenes.
• Scammers will put pressure on you to act quickly, before you have a chance to think through your decision or do any research.
What You Should Do:
• Most people don’t research charities before they donate. But it’s easy to do – check out charities at www.give.org or www.charitynavigator.orgbefore giving any money.
• If you are approached in person, ask for identification and details about the charity, including its full name and address, and how they will use the funds. If the person can’t furnish this information, close your door or walk away.
• The Federal Trade Commission suggests making an annual donation plan to list out which causes you will support and which reputable charities will receive your money.
When it comes to fraud, vigilance is our number one weapon. You have the power to protect yourself and your loved ones from scams. Please share this alert with friends and family.
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Stealing your home delivery
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Police ares repeating an old warning to parents about a form of ecstasy that could be mistakeThey look like candy and could very easily appeal to children, but police say they are dangerous.

“If your kids get these for Halloween candy, they ARE NOT CANDY!!!,” the photo’s caption reads. “They are the new shapes of "Ecstasy" and can kill kids through overdoses!!!”n for Halloween candy.
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Cell phone distraction
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Facebook people recorded their crimes
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Email refund scam

An email claiming that a refund you’re supposedly entitled to has somehow been blocked or failed delivers a nasty surprise if you click on the attachment that supposedly gives details of the problem.

The message is headed something like “Refund Failed” followed by an “ACH transfer” number. ACH is the organization that oversees transfers of funds between banks.

The message goes on to request recipients to “review the document provided here to have more details about this transfer.”
The scam may be particularly targeted at small businesses but in reality anyone could get it.

The attachment contains the “W97M” trojan, which downloads spying malware onto your PC — so don’t click it, ditch it!
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Mom makes funny safety video for driver now that kids are back in school.
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Some good news for a change. As from late June, some banks have started using the suffix “.bank” (dot-bank) in their Internet addresses.

Since banks will be carefully vetted before they’re allowed to use this suffix, the hope is that it will add another level of security to online banking — in the same way that “.gov” (dot-gov) indicates a genuine government website (provided it’s at the end of the main address).

The switch will probably take many months to complete. Look out for the change from your bank.
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Kids Letting Stranger In The House 
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Are You A Good Person For A Crime?

Offenders judge you based on your perceived vulnerability. How you act when in public and the signals you give are important. Appear confident and unafraid. Act like you know where you are going and what you are doing. Always look people in their eyes if concerned. Nod to them. Let them know you are aware of their presence.

Do not appear distracted.  Do not talk on your cell phone when  walking. But do have your cell phone ready to call 911.

Do not walk while listening to your portable music device. Do not drive while blasting others with your favorite music. It can attract the wrong people.
 
Do not appear to be under the influence of any substance (even if you are). Advertising the fact that you are under the influence in a public place may get you attention you don’t want.

Be aware of your surroundings.  If someone is following you on the street, then walk on the other side of the street. Walk in the middle of the street if necessary and if it can be done safely .  Do anything that indicates that you are in control.

Do not give money to anyone when asked. Politely but firmly say no and continue walking confidently. Do not give a cigarette to anyone who asks. If someone asks you for the time, provide it but continue to walk. 

Be pleasant but be firm. Have your cell phone ready. There have been many robberies that started with “do you have the time, do you have a cigarette, and can you spare a dollar?” But note that the vast majority of panhandlers are just seeking money, not a confrontation.
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