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The HIV Foundation Thailand
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Ending HIV is possible only if stigma and discrimination toward people affected by HIV ends first.
Ending HIV is possible only if stigma and discrimination toward people affected by HIV ends first.

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Meet Paeng - he is the Senior Caseworker at The HIV Foundation Thailand. Paeng helps support caseworkers with very complex cases, making sure that all their needs are met. Do you need help with HIV? Call our Bangkok hotline: 02 2361555.
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A Myanmar woman with HIV in Bangkok is eight months pregnant with no access to anti-HIV drugs to protect her or her unborn child... How does it happen? Read more here.
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POSITIVELY HOT! It's the anticipation of what's about to happen when the condom comes out that get's me going...
Braun
Braun
hivfoundation.com
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YOU ARE NOT ALONE. Sun 17 AUG,Lumpini Park, Bangkok: He had two children with him and it took some organizing to get them seated in a safe place, with all of their bags together so he could hold the sign that sends a supportive message to people with HIV across Asia. Watching him patiently taking the time to organize everything left us with the sense that he felt the importance of what we were doing for people with HIV. Afterward, he told us what great work we were doing, how important it was that we kept doing it and then he politely went on his way. Learn more about the You Are Not Alone campaign at http://hivfoundation.com/you-are-not-alone. #hivnotalone  
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SNAPSHOT ASIA, BANGKOK 29 July 2014: Stock-outs of life saving HIV treatment happening now in Bangkok - but only if you're poor.

Thais living with HIV from lower socio-economic backgrounds are being turned away from some government hospitals without the lifesaving HIV treatment they need.  This week and last week The HIV Foundation Thailand reports multiple clients being told there is no funding available for Efavirenz at their hospital. One client explained, “I went to [hospital] but they told me they have no money for medication because I’m a gold card holder. I don’t know what I’m going to do.” 

Thailand’s health care system is complex. The system supporting the majority of Thais is called the ‘gold card’ system. This is how it works: people with HIV attend a government hospital with their ‘gold card’ and pay just $1 (B30) to receive any kind of clinical service.

There are constant problems with this system. The most significant of these is that hospitals run out of funding for the gold card ‘class’ of patient. When they do, they close their books to gold card holders, even those with TB or HIV.

“In our work at The HIV Foundation Thailand we educate people with HIV about the importance of taking HIV drugs on time, every time” said Mr Nikorn Chimkong, Executive Director at the foundation.  Chimkong explained that not taking HIV drugs on time allows HIV to develop resistance to HIV drugs, making the available treatment options limited. 

“The Thai health system may be creating the environment for drug resistant HIV to become a serious public health issue in the future,” said Scott Berry, Regional Advisor for The HIV Foundation Thailand. Berry explained that drug-resistant HIV can be transmitted to others, creating a potentially new public health crisis, in which available HIV drugs are ineffective for newly HIV diagnosed people. 

The HIV Foundation Thailand has also received reports that some clinical practitioners are giving false information about HIV treatment to justify turning patients away. One client said, “The pharmacist told me not to worry, that Efavirenz stays in the blood for up to two month. But I know that’s not true.” 

Chimkong said, “The Thai government has a universal health policy to be proud of. But these problems at points of care across Thailand are undermining our good intentions.”

Do you need help with HIV? Call our Bangkok hotline on 02 2361555.
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SNAPSHOT ASIA: Yesterday, I travelled to Klong Toey, the largest slum in Bangkok. We’d heard from World Vision Thailand that a family was living with HIV in the slum without food or money. As we walked through Klong Toey it was full of rubbish and bad smells made unbearable by heat and humidity. Finally we found them. They were living in a cardboard box at the end of a crowded alley. We sat in the gutter with them and fed them. Neighbours emerged from their homes and came to sit with us. Even though they themselves have very little they had been giving this family food and water, but felt powerless to do much more. 

The father was thin like I remember from images of people with HIV in the early years. He is Thai but has no health rights. He comes from a minority ethnic group that has not been given full Thai citizenship. He has HIV and TB. The child, a two year old boy, climbed in to my arms because we’d brought toys for him which I was holding. He looked in to my eyes and I found myself holding back tears. He was sick. He was running a fever. He had a skin rash all over his body. 

The multimillion dollar investment in HIV and TB you read about in the press rarely reaches these people. Most practitioners in Asia will privately tell you that these sorts of people with HIV (migrants, refugees, undocumented, stateless) just have to die. And it was clear to me yesterday that without immediate help this family would soon be one of that number. 

Thanks to World Vision Thailand the father had just started TB treatment. Both father and mother are too sick to work. So my job from here is to attend to them every day and ensure they and the child have food to eat. I will take the child and his mother to a children’s hospital where I can arrange specialist treatment and care. Our foundation will look for accommodation options for them too.

We keep hearing that ending HIV is possible. It’s at times like these that I wonder if we have the compassion to make it happen. (From Jeab, Women and HIV Caseworker with The HIV Foundation Thailand). Do you need help with HIV? Call our Bangkok hotline on 02 2361555.
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SNAPSHOT ASIA: Yesterday, I travelled to Klong Toey, the largest slum in Bangkok. We’d heard from World Vision Thailand that a family was living with HIV in the slum without food or money. As we walked through Klong Toey it was full of rubbish and bad smells made unbearable by heat and humidity. Finally we found them. They were living in a cardboard box at the end of a crowded alley. We sat in the gutter with them and fed them. Neighbours emerged from their homes and came to sit with us. Even though they themselves have very little they had been giving this family food and water, but felt powerless to do much more. 

The father was thin like I remember from images of people with HIV in the early years. He is Thai but has no health rights. He comes from a minority ethnic group that has not been given full Thai citizenship. He has HIV and TB. The child, a two year old boy, climbed in to my arms because we’d brought toys for him which I was holding. He looked in to my eyes and I found myself holding back tears. He was sick. He was running a fever. He had a skin rash all over his body. 

The multimillion dollar investment in HIV and TB you read about in the press rarely reaches these people. Most practitioners in Asia will privately tell you that these sorts of people with HIV (migrants, refugees, undocumented, stateless) just have to die. And it was clear to me yesterday that without immediate help this family would soon be one of that number. 

Thanks to World Vision Thailand the father had just started TB treatment. Both father and mother are too sick to work. So my job from here is to attend to them every day and ensure they and the child have food to eat. I will take the child and his mother to a children’s hospital where I can arrange specialist treatment and care. Our foundation will look for accommodation options for them too.

We keep hearing that ending HIV is possible. It’s at times like these that I wonder if we have the compassion to make it happen. (From Jeab, Women and HIV Caseworker with The HIV Foundation Thailand). Do you need help with HIV? Call our Bangkok hotline on 02 2361555.
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"Migrants and asylum seekers living with HIV need all the support they can get." Dor, HIV caseworker. Do you need help with HIV? Call our Bangkok hotline on 02 2361555.  
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We woke up to the news of MH17 shot down over Ukraine airspace and the death of all souls on board, including some HIV practitioners heading to the International AIDS Conference in Melbourne. Our hearts go out to them, their family and friends. 
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