Profile

Cover photo
Meguey Baker
5,563 followers|5,174,312 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTubeReviews

Stream

Pinned

Meguey Baker
owner

Discussion  - 
77
21
Meguey Baker's profile photoJohn Bogart's profile photoMischa Krilov's profile photoCraig Maloney's profile photo
65 comments
 
.
Add a comment...

Meguey Baker

Shared publicly  - 
 
Today's progress on the community mapping project our 10 year old is doing for school. Dice are placeholders and are coded to building use.
51
Chris Bennett's profile photoBlue Gargantua's profile photoTina Trillitzsch's profile photoChris McNeilly's profile photo
5 comments
 
What are 1's?
Add a comment...

Meguey Baker

Shared publicly  - 
 
Youngest son's homework: map a community around a river. Hello. He's been doing this since he was 4. No mere sketch in the provided box for him. Full-on three dimensional sculpted terrain, stage one.
49
1
Ezio Melega's profile photoMauro Ghibaudo's profile photoPeter Tierney's profile photoMeguey Baker's profile photo
5 comments
 
+Keenan Kibrick I love google maps, but old-school model making is so cool.
Add a comment...

Meguey Baker

Shared publicly  - 
 
Surprise day off means Sew All The Things! In the foreground: two completed pillowcases for the youngest son's dragon cave bed. Hopefully I'll get the frame and canopy finished today too. Ambitious Meg is ambitious!
36
Autumn Heart's profile photoStefano Burchi's profile photoMeguey Baker's profile photoJessica Duncan's profile photo
5 comments
 
EE!!! that is so cool
Add a comment...

Meguey Baker

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is my song, o God of all the nations. A song of peace for their land and for mine.
65
6
josh savoie's profile photoBrian Holt Hawthorne's profile photoSebastian Baker's profile photoMeguey Baker's profile photo
7 comments
 
Trump Jr., but basically yeah. Skittles response was great" Skittles are candy, refugees are people. We don't think this is an appropriate metaphor. 
Add a comment...

Meguey Baker

Shared publicly  - 
 
I am thinking a whole heck of a lot at this very moment about who gets to tell me (or you, dear reader) what my truth is. What my lived experience of [insert topic XYZ] is. I've had some really odd experiences of saying "this is a thing I know first-hand" and having people who only know me from the internet or maybe a convention tell me they are quite sure that's not the truth. It's bizarre. Our own lived experience may not be objective truth - eyewitness accounts are known to be unreliable- but holy crap, if I say "this is what happened to me, this is what I've lived through, this is what the situation is for me and my family and close IRL meatspace friends", you telling me I must be wrong is just laughably insulting and weird.
54
Jessica Hammer's profile photoLex Larson's profile photoJim White (T.W.Wombat)'s profile photoZak Sabbath's profile photo
14 comments
 
Donald Trump self-reported that he didn't say that thing about Global warming being a hoax invented by China. He was wrong. There is a record that he was wrong. His self-report is without worth. We get to tell him what his experience is since we have a record of it and he remembered it wrong or lied.
Some people are unreliable. Ideas about affirmation and encouragement and the truth of your truth need to account for this or they're just empty self-help language.
Add a comment...
 
A watchful owl in an unexpected place.
4
Add a comment...

Meguey Baker

Shared publicly  - 
 
Best way to decompress after a harrowing day of jury duty: Mario cart with the kids :)
51
Ben Jarvis's profile photoGianluca Casu's profile photo
2 comments
 
Must have been a HARD day.

Add a comment...

Meguey Baker

Shared publicly  - 
 
Folks, let me tell you a little story. Once upon a time, there was a little girl growing up along the Susquehanna, a wide and sleepy river curving through hills with names like Unadilla and Oneonta and Oneida. She learned every season of the river, and the little tributary nearest her home, the Butternut creek. The people of Uncas had some other name for the creek, and it whispered to her in the winter and danced with her in the spring and sang her summer lullabies and swept her along through autumn with the leaves spinning on the surface. Water filled her life, skating and swimming and clearing debris from the little stream each spring and fall. Frogs and flowers and birds surrounded the girl and the river and she listened to their stories. She listened to the stories of the people who came before, she learned the reason the river twisted this way and that, and she learned that all life, from the towns to the farms to the skimming bugs depended on water. Now the woman lives on the shores of the Connecticut, and water is still life.

I ask you to think about any river you have loved, or any water you depend on, and donate to this project. A whole huge raft of role-playing game designers have set their work here for you in gratitude. All the profits go to help the water protectors in Standing Rock. Thank you, and thank you +Jerry Grayson for putting this bundle together; I am honored to be part of it.
 
The Standing Rock Charity Bundle is now LIVE!
Tell the world they can help contribute to the cause.
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Donation Fund [bundle] [BUNDLE] - This special bundle product contains the following titles. A Dirty World Explore the rain-sl
4 comments on original post
23
2
Meguey Baker's profile photoJoe Bardales's profile photo
3 comments
 
I feel the same way, +Meguey Baker. I've lived many places over the years, but the Susquehanna River always feels like home. And now it is again. :)
Add a comment...

Meguey Baker

Shared publicly  - 
 
Quilts I made today. The ones with 9-patches are 27" square, the hearts one is 21"x27", and the green and purple one is 21" square. These are for our local hospital's pediatric surgery unit. My guild aims to make sure that every child who comes in for surgery is greeted by a quilt on their gurney, which is with them through anesthesia, is there in recovery, and they get to take it home. Two years ago each member of the guild made two dozen 9-patch blocks and I've been selecting coordinating prints and making these little quilts. 
40
Meguey Baker's profile photo
 
The hearts are a panel from the guild box that I added a border to, and the purple is the leftovers from a quilt I made a couple years back.
Add a comment...

Meguey Baker

Shared publicly  - 
 
Thank you, +B. Maura Townsend, for this excellent breakdown! Thinking that women didn't have perfectly functional and aesthetically pleasing pockets is like thinking women never took up arms or ran a business. I've documented lovely functional slit pockets on wedding dresses from the height of the "you must look like a Grecian column" era. C'mon. History matters, sometimes for unexpected reasons. Maybe try altering the pockets in your jeans (seriously, it's super easy) or adding them to a skirt or dress (yeah, also pretty easy) and checking out some actual fashion history.
 
Let’s talk about the weird, sexist way that people look at clothing of earlier periods for a sec.

As someone who’s done reenacting with those tie-on pockets, I’m calling bullshit on the “almost impossible to use” assertion about them. The author of the linked fashion piece knows fuck all about historical clothing and how it worked.

Skirts often opened at the sides. Open fronted gowns that were worn over petticotes in the 17th and 18th centuries still sometimes had the side slit for accessing the pockets. And the part where she complains about those being unflattering, well, that's just a huge giveaway about how little she knows about period clothing. Hips were in. Butts and hips were padded out, and the hanging pockets were invisible from the outside.

Those tie on pockets could be small and mostly personally ornamental or HUGE. Women could have hidden encyclopedia volumes, in pockets they made themselves to suit their needs, and which would be worn under those voluminous skirts, which they also often made themselves. The tie on pockets would go over the stays, like the petticoats, and thus the weight of the pocket contents would be distributed over the torso along with the skirts. With the side openings, single or on both sides, those pockets were super practical, deep enough for all kinds of things, and totally accessible to their owner.

They were like fanny packs that nobody could see, ffs. Personal perspective: I put an adult cat in one once and wore him around the house, under my skirts, had no trouble with the weight, and he was perfectly content.

I call bullshit on the bit about the hanging pockets not fitting under the dress she chose as an example of "the 1800s" (OMG I could rant for hours on that alone, all the various silhouettes being lumped under late empire), because that’s one from the tail end of the empire period*. Pockets (though often single) were already making a comeback under the dresses of the very late 1810s and 1820s, after falling out of fashion from about 1798 for the cutting edge people in the clingy wet dresses. Except for that (and even during that unpockety bit there were still some women who stuck with slightly restyled older gowns and refused to surrender their pockets to fashion), there was room for all kinds of things under the skirts, up until the late 19th century, when skirts got narrow and smoothed out around the hips. They usually had side openings which were very convenient for wearing pockets under (and some workaday pieces had pockets sewn in to seams).

Modern fashion that prioritizes clingyness and fit over practicality is where blame should be cast for crap non-pockets. So did the "Grecian style" in revolutionary France. Do you see a pattern here?

* And don’t get me started on how the fashion of the 1790s through 1830s basically did the very same thing to dudes wrt pockets. Scandalously close fitting trousers, some even requiring corsets for dudes to fit the fashionable ideal. If there wasn’t room in the coat, and it didn’t fit in your tiny waistcoat pockets, you had to carry a bag. the Murse is VERY 19th century. That entire period was all “purses for EVERYONE! Pockets for NOBODY!”
8 comments on original post
21
Add a comment...
 
A dire warning indeed.
9
Add a comment...
Meguey's Collections
Collections Meguey is following
Work
Occupation
I restore, conserve, or complete vintage textiles, as well as create new ones. I also write and play role-playing games,
Skills
game design, group facilitation, sex education, writing, textile conservation, quilting, sewing,
Links
Contributor to
Story
Tagline
Every person has a story worth telling and a story worth hearing.
Introduction
I'm fairly confident I'm the only Meguey Baker. Having an odd spelling of an unusual Spanish flower name makes me pretty distinctive. Also, I'm basically friendly, so even if you were not looking for me, chances are I won't mind you asking to make sure. Textile conservationist, quilter, game designer, sex ed teacher, mother of three.

Solis radius
Audite, et divulgent vocem
Bragging rights
Things I'm proud of: Raising three thoughtful and compassionate sons, each of whom I had on purpose. Writing 1001 Nights: A Game of Enticing Stories. Writing Psi*Run. Holding two one-woman shows of my quilts. Using fiberglass fabric to repair a car door. 12 years of working with new mothers to address post-partum stress and depression, and prevent child abuse. Designing games for girls in Ethiopia as part of a major project for social change with The Girl Effect.
Basic Information
Gender
Female
The perfect end to a blustery day at Housesteds. We were there on the early side, so it was very quiet except for some cheery regulars at the bar in the next room. The food was great and generous, the service was excellent, and the atmosphere was welcoming and cozy. No grand pretension, just a pub of exceptional quality. Worth going out of your way to visit. -Bakers, visiting from the US on June 30, 2016.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
The food was great, the service was cheery, and the hand-made needlework and tea things made the little shop really really quite special.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
This is an outstanding museum. Although the building may be small, the amount of information and artifacts attractively and informatively displayed is impressive, and the incredible history in the surrounding landscape is stunning. This is an excellent family museum, perfect for kids as young as 6 or 7, and for all ages above. All of our party (ages 10, 16, 19, 44 and 45) very much enjoyed the hands-on displays that added to the full context of the exhibits. The cafe is really top-notch and the gift shop is lovely. I'd put this on par with the National Museum of Scotland, just highly focused and most of the things to see are in the landscape outside, which again makes it appealing for families! My one wish is that there was a guidebook to buy similar to those at Urquhart Castle, to consult as we walked the landscape and carry home with us after.
• • •
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
4 reviews
Map
Map
Map
This was perhaps the best place we stayed. Friendly and efficient staff, comfortable and well-kept rooms, a great kitchen and common space, laundry across the car park, and the most amazing views out the windows! If you stay, don't miss the loop walk down to the locks to watch the boats on the canal.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago