Profile cover photo
Profile photo
H M Duarte
2,148 followers -
*If we are possible, anything is...*
*If we are possible, anything is...*

2,148 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
The eye of Super Typhoon Vongfong

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took this image circling Earth on the International Space Station during his six-month Blue Dot mission.

Alexander commented: "The eye of Super Typhoon Vongfong is 80 km across. Looks very dark in there."

Copyright ESA/NASA
Photo

Post has attachment
Eye of the hurricane

Photo from the International Space Station of Hurricane Rita's eye in the Gulf of Mexico during September 2005.

Credit: Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center
Photo

Post has attachment
NGC 1333

Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born.

Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects, allowing a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.

The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group lies where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud.

By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, scientists hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.

The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby.

The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented, leading scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.

In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. A. Gutermuth (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA)
Photo

Post has attachment
Volcán de Colima & The Moon

Colima, Mexico

Image Credit & Copyright: Sergio Tapiro
Photo

Post has attachment
This image shows the far side of the Moon, illuminated by the Sun, as it crosses between the DSCOVR spacecraft's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera and telescope, and the Earth - one million miles away.

Image Credit: NASA/NOAA
Photo

Post has attachment
The galaxy NGC 1277 (center) is embedded in the nearby Perseus galaxy cluster.

All the ellipticals and round yellow galaxies in the picture are located in this cluster. NGC 1277 is a relatively compact galaxy compared to the galaxies around it. The Perseus cluster is 250 million light years from us.

Credit: David W. Hogg, Michael Blanton, and the SDSS Collaboration
Photo

Post has attachment
Earth and Moon seen from the International Space Station

ISS, Orbit of the Earth

Credit: ESA/NASA/Alexander Gerst
Photo

Post has attachment
Hubble view of the Lagoon Nebula

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the Lagoon Nebula, an object with a deceptively tranquil name.

The region is filled with intense winds from hot stars, churning funnels of gas, and energetic star formation, all embedded within an intricate haze of gas and pitch-dark dust.

Credit:NASA, ESA, J. Trauger (Jet Propulson Laboratory)
Photo

Post has attachment
The star forming cloud RCW 34

This richly coloured cloud of gas called RCW 34 is a site of star formation in the southern constellation of Vela (The Sails). This image was taken using the FORS instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope in northern Chile.

Credit::ESO
Photo

Post has attachment
Exploded Star Blooms Like a Cosmic Flower
G299

G299 was left over by a particular class of supernovas called Type Ia. Astronomers think that a Type Ia supernova is a thermonuclear explosion – involving the fusion of elements and release of vast amounts of energy − of a white dwarf star in a tight orbit with a companion star.

If the white dwarf’s partner is a typical, Sun-like star, the white dwarf can become unstable and explode as it draws material from its companion. Alternatively, the white dwarf is in orbit with another white dwarf, the two may merge and can trigger an explosion.

Image Credit: NASA/CXC/U.Texas
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded