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Bob Prichard
225 followers -
Enjoys improving athlete efficiency
Enjoys improving athlete efficiency

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The Perfect Gift for the Golfer Who Has Everything But 300-yard Drives

The Somax Power Hip Trainer (PHT) is the only home aerobic exercise machine that increases the strength and speed of hip rotation for golf.

Since every increase in hip speed is multiplied 25X at the clubhead, and increasing hip speed pulls the club down under plane and eliminates slicing, working out on the Power Hip Trainer not only increases distance but also improves control.

In addition, golfers have lost up to 20 lbs. and 4" off their waist over the winter as they worked out their legs, hips and core on their Power Hip Trainer.

Consisting of a sturdy 2' x 3' non-slip steel base, a massive high tensile strength steel spring, a height-adjustable steel connecting tube and a padded steel hip cinch, the Power Hip Trainer comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee and a 1-year warranty on parts. It also includes a 2-disc DVD demonstrating complete workouts from 15 minutes to a full hour.

The Power Hip Trainer offers golfers a non-impact aerobic workout as they strengthen the most important muscles in their body--the hips. Instead of spending boring hours on the treadmill every week, golfers can now strengthen their heart as they improve their swing skills.

A page full of 5 star reviews from golfers and instructors can be found at http://swing-speed.com/reviews.php

One 45-year-old instructor and former tour player increased his swing speed from 115 to 128 after just his first 15-minute workout. A college-age golfer increased his average drive from 290 to 350 in just six months. His fairway percentage also went from 50% to over 90%.

The Power Hip Trainer can be ordered on line at http://www.swing-speed.com for $275 plus $35 continental US shipping. Delivery by Fedex Ground is just 2-5 business days across the continental US. Shipping quotes provided on overseas orders.

Videos showing workouts, assembly and a simple at-home hip strength test can also be viewed at http://www.swing-speed.com

Increase your swing speed with the Somax Power Hip Trainer. The Somax Power Hip Trainer is the first all-steel home exercise machine that guarantees you will add 25 mph to your golf swing speed, reduce casting, and eliminate slicing, or your money back.* Since distance increases 2.5 yards for every 1 mph you add to your swing speed, a 25 mph increase in swing speed can add 62.5 yards. We also guarantee you will add 10 mph to your baseball pitch speed, and karate punch and kick speed. And you will add at least 16 mph to your tennis forehand speed and 18 mph to your baseball bat speed, or your money back.* We can make these guarantees because any increase in your hip speed will be multiplied 10-25X by the hidden speed multiplier built in to your own body. Here is a short video that explains how it works.             Increase Swing Speed 25 MPH with the Somax Power Hip Trainer*
Increase your swing speed with the Somax Power Hip Trainer. The Somax Power Hip Trainer is the first all-steel home exercise machine that guarantees you will add 25 mph to your golf swing speed, reduce casting, and eliminate slicing, or your money back.* Since distance increases 2.5 yards for every 1 mph you add to your swing speed, a 25 mph increase in swing speed can add 62.5 yards. We also guarantee you will add 10 mph to your baseball pitch speed, and karate punch and kick speed. And you will add at least 16 mph to your tennis forehand speed and 18 mph to your baseball bat speed, or your money back.* We can make these guarantees because any increase in your hip speed will be multiplied 10-25X by the hidden speed multiplier built in to your own body. Here is a short video that explains how it works. Increase Swing Speed 25 MPH with the Somax Power Hip Trainer*
swing-speed.com

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We are finishing up our new book based on our accidental discovery that as we released microfibers to increase chest expansion in our golfers, swimmers, runners, tennis and baseball players they not only improved their endurance, but also—to their surprise and ours--improved their mental performance.

After completing his four-week Somax Microfiber Reduction program, a college golfer who had been making C’s all through school, transferred to a more difficult school and not only graduated with A’s, but also with two majors and two minors.

Parents of kids in our swim camps have reported their kids improved their grade point average (GPA) by up to a full letter grade. One proud father reported his daughter even received a A in physics after receiving C’s in her science classes.

A runner who worked as a senior software engineer in Silicon Valley reported two promotions and three raises in pay during his four-week program.

The reason?
He said he was able to solve software problems so much faster than before.

Our book not only relates more inspiring stories of dramatic increases in brain power as we increased breathing ranges, but also includes the results of scientific studies that show the improvement in problem solving with increased oxygen and the damage that low oxygen does to our brains.

More importantly, the book shows you how to measure your breathing ranges to see if restricted chest expansion is also restricting your brain.

If you don’t want to wait until February to read our book, you can order directions for measuring your breathing ranges now by going to http://www.somaxsports.com/order.php

You can either order the breathing ranges article, or any of the sport measuring articles, as they all contain directions for measuring your breathing ranges.

Once you send us your breathing ranges, we will be happy to send you some breathing stretches from the book at no additional charge.

You may also want to order our Demonstration DVD’s on the same page just to see how quickly we can improve flexibility with our Microfiber Reduction program.

As always, let us know if you have any questions.




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Stride Problems Forcing American Runners to Lose Gold at Rio

American runners at Rio continue to lose Gold Medals to runners who are simply more efficient—and not stronger or more fit.

A good example is #Shalane Flanagan who finished 6th in the women’s marathon behind winner Jemima Sumgong.

Shalane is extremely inefficient in her upper body mechanics, as you can see in these photos Sumgong and Flanagan.
Sumgong leans forward 11 degrees in her trunk.  This is efficient as it places the center of mass forward and minimizes overstriding, which slows the runner down.  Surprisingly, Shalane leans back 5 degrees while she runs, which increases overstriding.  Overstriding, or landing with the foot forward of the center of mass, is like racing a car with one foot on the brake at all times.
In addition, the only time most runners lean back is to slow themselves down after crossing the finish line.
Shalane also has a smaller Arm Extension Angle than Sumgong.
Arm extension is important as it affects the leg on the same side.  The more you can bring your elbow back while you run, the easier it is to lift the knee on the same size.  This increases your Stride Angle, enabling you to run faster.  Sumgong ran faster than Shalane because she covered more ground with each stride.
As you will see, Shalane’s poor Trunk Angle and Arm Extension Angle are both related to her breathing problems.
But these are small potatoes compared the most damaging difference between Shalane and Sumgong.
Sumgong bounces up 2” and then drops down 2” with each stride. Since a marathon runner takes about 1,000 strides per mile, she runs up the equivalent of a 4,367-foot mountain and then back down again during the race-- or a total of 1.65 vertical miles.
Shalane bounces up 3” and then drops down 3” with each stride, or 50% more than Sumgong. This is the equivalent of running up and down a 6,550-foot peak during the marathon.
Imagine if Sumgong challenged Shalane to a race where she would run up and down a 4,367-foot mountain, but Shalane would have to run up and down a 6,550-foot mountain. No runner in their right mind would accept such a challenge as it is so patently unfair and unequal.
But this is what happened during the Rio women’s marathon.
Sumgong ran her mountain, Shalane ran her mountain. Sumgong won the race. Shalane lost.
Runners don’t have to bounce up and down when they run. Sprinters, for instance, bounce up and down only ¼”.  Belayneh Densimo bounced up and down less than 1” when he set a World Record at the 1988 Rotterdam Marathon that lasted for 10 years. At the end of the race, he was asked how he felt. He replied that he felt like he could run another 5 miles. More support for our contention that the marathon is difficult primarily for the vertical distance run.
Apart from bouncing up and down so much, Shalane has an apparent breathing problem, as you can see by comparing her chest to Sumgong’s.
 
Shalane is arching her back to try to keep her neck as vertical as possible.  This is a common compensation we see in runners who have restricted chest expansion. When the chest expansion is restricted, the ribs are pulled down, which in turn pulls the neck and head forward.
Restricted chest expansion is also often accompanied by forward shoulders—which you can also see in Shalane’s photo. Chest expansion can often be the result of allergies, bronchitis, or pneumonia when young. The chest muscles tense up to reduce the amount of cold air going in to the lungs. The connective tissue between the chest muscles thinks that the ribs have been broken, and starts to form microfibers (mild scar tissue) between the muscles to form an internal cast. Unfortunately, these microfibers not only do not go away after the stress has passed, they actually accumulate over time, further reducing chest expansion.  This reduces the amount of oxygen going to the muscles—obviously not a good result for marathon runners.
You see this same full chest and forward lean in other winning marathoners like Haile Gebrselassie.
When we release microfibers in runners, they usually double their chest expansion in just 4 weeks or less.  Many have increased their vital capacity 33%--from 3 liters to 4 liters of air.
But more impressive is what it does to their running times.
One collegiate rower, for instance, dropped her time on a 10K training circuit from a 9-minute mile to a 7:30 mile after we released microfibers in her chest.  Most of our runners cut a minute per mile off their running pace as we improve their breathing ranges and stride efficiency in four weeks or less.
So Shalane ran 50% farther than Sumgong in the vertical direction, leans backward instead of leaning forward, has a stiffer upper body, and takes in less oxygen—but only finishes a minute and a half behind Sumgong.  Tell me that she isn’t much more fit and stronger than Sumgong.
The other stride characteristic that wins races is Stride Angle, the maximum opening between the front and trailing leg. For every degree a runner increases their Stride Angle, they increase their stride length by 2%.  So just a 10-degree increase means you cover 20% more ground with each stride. It is very difficult to keep up with someone who is covering 20% more ground than you are with each stride.
The current king of the Stride Angle is Usain Bolt.
Bolt’s Stride Angle was greater than any of his competitors in the 100m or 200m sprints.  He effortlessly beat them not because of his height or leg length, but because his Stride Angle was greater.  This has been the case throughout his career, as we demonstrated in our prior analysis of his stride during the Beijing Olympics at
http://www.somaxsports.com/photo.php?analysis=bolt
We also examined the Stride Angle in the marathon
http://www.somaxsports.com/photo.php?analysis=wanjiru
But 112 degrees is not the limit of what is possible in running.
Here are photos of an 800m runner after we released microfibers that were binding together the muscles of his hips and restricting his Stride Angle.
When he returned home to run with his high school team, his coach asked his dad ‘Where did your son get that mile-long stride?’.
American can clean up at running at Tokyo if runners will simply get over the idea that success lies on the road and in the gym. Muscles are not the key to winning races because muscles are only 20% efficient—80% of their energy is expended as heat.
What they need to succeed at the next Olympics is to improve their stride efficiency and expand their breathing ranges.  These are both achieved by releasing microfibers in the connective tissue—not by exercising or strengthening the muscles.
Once they do this, they will be unbeatable.

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A close examination of the stride mechanics of Sumgong and Flanagan shows that the American women ran a steeper, longer marathon than the race winner, with a less efficient upper body.
 
All runners bounce up and down during the marathon.
 
Sumgong bounced up and down 2" with each stride.  With 1,000 strides per mile, this adds up to .827 miles going up, and .827 miles dropping down, for a total of 1.65 vertical miles over the 26.2 horizontal mile course.
 
It is this vertical distance that makes the marathon difficult. Running uphill taxes the heart, while running downhill taxes the quads.
 
By contrast, Flanagan bounced up and down 3" with each stride, for a total vertical distance of 2.48 miles.
 
So the marathon was .83 vertical miles longer for Flanagan than it was for the winner Sumgong.
 
In addition, Sumgong was much more efficient in her upper body mechanics than Flanagan.
 
Trunk Angle
 
It is more efficient to run leaning forward because your center of mass moves forward over your foot strike.
 
In addition, you will notice that all sprinters lean forward while they are racing, and then slow down after the finish line by leaning back.
 
Here are the Trunk Angles of Sumgong and Flanagan.  Sumgong leans forward while racing 11 degrees, while Flanagan leans backward 5 degrees.
 
 
Arm Extension
 
The arms and legs work together in running.  As one leg goes forward, the arm on the same side extends back. The greater the arm extension, the easier it is to move the leg forward.  Samgong has an Arm Extension Angle of 70 degrees, while Flanagan has only 56 degrees. 
 
One thing that reduces Arm Angle in runners is doing bench presses and push-ups.  While designed to improve upper body strength, they also reduce upper body flexibility, increasing the effort needed to run with a good stride length.  It may be that Flanagan lost arm extension from doing these exercises.
 
 
The results of the women's Rio marathon indicate that Flanagan is in much more fit than Samgong and could have easily won the marathon with a more efficient stride.

A more complete analysis of Shalane Flanagan's stride mechanics can be found at http://www.somaxsports.com/video.php?analysis=shalane-flanagan-upper-body-stride-analysis
 
Bob Prichard
Somax Performance Institute
44 Gold Medals and 11 World Records
YouTube Videos-- 5 Million Views
415-435-9880
 
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2016-08-14
4 Photos - View album

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Somax top elite athlete analysis videos have now surpassed 5,000,000 views on our YouTube channel somaxperformance.  You can also see our videos at http://www.somaxsports.com/video.php  where they are separated by sport, such as golf, tennis, baseball, running, etc.

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Somax Predicted Tiger's Yips Four Years Ago
4 years ago Somax published a video analysis of Tiger's swing and predicted he would develop the yips ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52-l9ZW60dk ).

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Another pro golfer who developed  injuries from lifting weights--LPGA player Miriam Nagl. Fortunately, we were able to restore her flexibility with our Microfiber Reduction program. Full report at http://somaxsports.com/clients.php?client=Nagl
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2014-08-17
3 Photos - View album

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Wall Street Journal Cites Dangers of Lifting Weights for Golfers

In today's Wall Street Journal, golf columnist John Paul Newport highlighted the dangers of weight lifting for golfers.

http://online.wsj.com/articles/are-pro-golfers-too-bulked-up-1408147800

Newport cites Tom Watson's concern that lifting weights may be responsible for the rash of injuries on the tour--Tiger Woods being the prime example.

Unfortunately, lifting weights increases muscle strength and size by tearing many of the 20-50,000 muscle fibers that make up each muscle. As these tiny fibers repair, they get bigger and stronger.
But the body also creates scar tissue every time there are muscle tears.

It is the accumulation of this scar tissue (microfibers) that make golfers lose flexibility from lifting weights. As they lose flexibility in their hips from squats, dead lifts, lunges and leg presses, their hips stop rotating prematurely after impact as the upper body continues to turn while holding on to a club going 100 mph, which puts enormous stress on the lower back.

Fortunately, we can release these microfibers with our Microfiber Reduction program.

Here is one example of golfer who ruined her body and her game by lifting weights, and was then very glad that our Microfiber Reduction program not only restored her flexibility but also quadrupled her tour income as well.

http://somaxsports.com/clients.php?client=Nagl

If you or your students have ever lifted weights, even decades ago, then your body is being restricted by microfibers that are restricting your swing and putting stress on your lower back.

We also find that golfers who took up running to stay in shape have often developed microfibers in their hips from repeated impacts while running.

We recommend that you order one of our articles that show you how to measure your flexibility for golf.

If your measurements show that you have lost flexibility, then we recommend you schedule a Day at Somax so that you can begin to reverse your loss of flexibility.

 

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Baseball players 17 and older on the Warriors high school team worked out on 7 Somax Power Hip Trainers during the season, pumped up their batting average from .321 to .382, bumped up their swing speed as much as 15 mph, and won the state championship with a 35-3 record. 

One of the players improved so much that he is now in line for a baseball scholarship--when before no school was interested in him.

Faster bat speed means you can wait longer and get a better eye on the pitch--which is why the team average jumped 61 points.

Watch the entire beginning workout with 2 minute drills as the players increase the strength and speed of their hips and improve the separation between their shoulders and hips.

The Somax Power Hip Trainer is the only baseball training aid that increases the strength and speed of hip rotation for batting.  Every increase in hip speed is multiplied 18X at the bat because of the 18:1 ratio of the 54" distance of the sweet spot on the bat to the center of rotation and the 3" distance of the hip joints to the center of rotation.

More information on the Somax Power Hip Trainer can be found at http://www.swing-speed.com/baseball_team.php

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Coach Bob Greco bought 7 Somax Power Hip Trainers for the 17 and older players on his high school baseball team. They worked out on the Somax Power Hip Trainers during the season, pumped up their batting average from .321 to .382, bumped up their swing speed as much as 15 mph, and won the state championship with a 35-3 record.
 
One of the players improved so much that he is now in line for a baseball scholarship--whereas before no school was interested in him.

Faster bat speed means you can wait longer and get a better eye on the pitch--which is why the team average jumped 61 points.

Watch Coach Greco describe why he decided to train his players on the Somax Power Hip Trainer and what the results have been for his team.
The Somax Power Hip Trainer is the only baseball training aid that increases the strength and speed of hip rotation for batting.  

Every increase in hip speed is multiplied 18X at the bat because of the 18:1 ratio of the 54" distance of the sweet spot on the bat to the center of rotation and the 3" distance of the hip joints to the center of rotation.

More information on the Somax Power Hip Trainer can be found at 
http://www.swing-speed.com/baseball_team.php
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