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Physical Therapy Of Mansfield
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Motivational Monday: -Anonymous http://dlvr.it/Q4JHmv
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Recipe Wednesday - Braised Cod With Leeks: Simple yet sophisticated! Click here for this yummy recipe! http://dlvr.it/Q3T8zT
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Walking meetings may increase physical activity in the workplace: No studies have looked into this type of approach yet Sitting for extended periods of time on a regular basis can lead to a number of health-related issues. Unfortunately, the majority of Americans spend a large part of their days sitting at a desk because it's part of their job. Walking, on the other hand, is known to have a positive impact on overall health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends walking at least 10,000 steps per day. Even walking for as little as 30 minutes each day has been found to reduce the risk for chronic diseases like osteoporosis, breast and colon cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Sadly, there are very few opportunities for workers who sit for most of the day to increase their physical activity levels and walk more at work. This is even more difficult in white-collar work environments, which generally don't support physical activity throughout the day, as is the case in many blue-collar environments. One way to increase the amount of physical activity in the workplace is by walking during meetings instead of sitting. Although this idea has been around for some time—and may even be used at some businesses already—no studies have been performed yet to investigate the effect of walking meetings on physical activity. Therefore, a pilot study was conducted to determine how walking meetings affect physical activity levels, and if this sort of program is acceptable and feasible. A pilot study is an initial study performed to decide if future research should be conducted on a topic. 17 workers participate in three-week study Researchers recruited groups of workers that had an established meeting time and met for 30 or 60 minutes every week. This process led to seven groups of two or three workers each being accepted, for a total of 17 participants. All participants were given an accelerometer (a device used to measure physical activity levels) at the start of the study to be worn throughout most of the day for the next three weeks. During the first week, groups were instructed to carry on with their traditional sitting meetings and regular work schedule so that standard data could be collected. For the next two weeks, they were told to modify one of their sitting meetings to a standing meeting instead. At the end of each week, participants filled out a survey that gave additional information on their physical activity levels. Finally, after the third and final week, all groups participated in a focus group with the researchers to discuss how the walking meetings went overall. Participants increase physical activity levels and find program to be easy to implement The data taken from the accelerometers and surveys showed that in general, workers were more physically active during the second two weeks of the study. The average number of minutes participants engaged in combined work-related moderate or vigorous physical activity per week increased from 107 during week 1, to 114 at week 2, and 117 at week 3. On the day of the walking meeting, the average number of minutes spent in physical activity increased from 34 minutes at week 1 to 43 minutes at week 3. All participants agreed to the strategy taught by researchers to organize and conduct the walking meetings, and all groups walked for 30-40 minutes during each walking meeting. In addition, participants said that the walking program was feasible, acceptable and easy to implement into their workday without interfering with workflow. Based on these findings, it appears that having walking meetings can be a feasible way to increase physical activity levels in an office work environment, and it's very easy to introduce. Since this is only a pilot study, more research and larger studies are needed to further evaluate these findings. Nonetheless, this study underlines one possible strategy to get individuals to be more physically active at work and counteract the effects of sitting for most of the day. -As reported in the June '16 issue of Preventing Chronic Disease http://dlvr.it/Q2gPWf
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Motivational Monday: -Mahatma Gandhi http://dlvr.it/Q1xCPk
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Exercises are helpful for neck pain: Strong evidence to support the use of these exercises is lacking Neck pain ranks as one of the most common painful disorders out there. At least 15% of the population is affected by it, and it occurs more frequently in women than men and in middle-age individuals. Neck pain can restrict movement and interfere with normal activities, making it a burden to many of those affected by it. In some cases, problems with the neck can lead to what's called a cervicogenic headache, which means the neck issues need to be addressed to fix it. There are several different strategies for treating neck pain and other disorders, but most consist of various types of exercises to improve flexibility and increase strength in the region. Although these exercises are commonly used to treat neck pain, some recent studies have only found low-quality evidence to support their use. For this reason, stronger evidence is needed to more firmly recommend different types of exercise for neck disorders. Researchers, therefore, decided to conduct a Cochrane review on the topic. Cochrane reviews collect all the highest-quality research available in order to provide guidance for treatment, and this particular review focused on the effectiveness of different types of exercise for neck disorders. Researchers identify 27 studies to use for the review To conduct this review, researchers looked for studies that investigated the use of various exercises for neck disorders. They only accepted randomized-controlled trials (RCTs), which are the most powerful type of individual studies conducted, where patient are randomly assigned to different treatment groups to determine which is most effective. This search process led to a total of 27 RCTs being accepted for the review. The results of each RCT were graded based on the effect of each treatment studied as either small, medium or large. All studies were also assessed for their level of quality to determine how reliable the information they provided was. Exercises that improve strength and endurance are found to be effective On the whole, there was not much strong evidence to support the use of exercises as researchers had hoped to find. Nonetheless, they identified studies of moderate quality that showed how effective various exercises can be for neck disorders. In particular, they found moderate evidence that showed strengthening exercises and endurance training for the neck and surrounding muscles were effective for both neck pain and cervicogenic headaches. There was also low-quality evidence that using stretching exercises only was not very effective for neck disorders. Based on these findings, it appears that exercises that increase strength and endurance may be beneficial for patients with neck disorders. Since the overall quality of evidence in the review was low, researchers suggest that additional studies are conducted to investigate this topic further. While results from these studies are anticipated, patients with neck disorders should be encouraged to see a physical therapist for exercise recommendations and other guidance to properly address their condition. -As reported in the August '16 issue of Manual Therapy http://dlvr.it/Q1TH70
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Recipe Wednesday - Chicken Quesadillas With Red and Green Salsa: Whether you are eating this as an appetizer or a main dish, you are surely in for a treat! Click here for the recipe! http://dlvr.it/Q15bKB
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Strengthening exercises are beneficial for arthritis: Release of new research calls for an updated review Osteoarthritis is a painful condition in which cartilage that normally serves as protection for joints gradually wears away over time. Eventually, this causes bones to rub against one another and results in pain and disability that make it difficult to function normally. Osteoarthritis can occur in any joint, but it's most common in the knees and the hips. There are a number of strategies that can be used to treat knee osteoarthritis, including exercises guided by a physical therapist, known as exercise therapy. One component of exercise therapy is called resistance exercise, which uses some form of resistance—such as body weight, elastic bands or machines—to force muscles to contract. It has been found to reduce pain and is commonly used in many physical therapy programs. Some studies have evaluated the use of resistance exercise for treating knee osteoarthritis, but there have been flaws in the research that makes it inconclusive. In addition, new research has emerged on the topic recently that calls for an updated review to analyze. With this in mind, researchers conducted a powerful pair of studies called a systematic review and meta-analysis. The systematic review gathered all of the highest-quality evidence on the topic available, and the meta-analysis compared the findings of these studies to one another with the goal of reaching a conclusion. Researchers search five databases for relevant studies To perform the review, investigators searched through five major medical databases to find studies on the use of resistance exercises to treat knee osteoarthritis. They only accepted randomized-controlled trials (RCTs)—which are considered to be the highest quality of individual study available—that compared resistance exercise to a control treatment. This could include no treatment or something basic like an educational course that did not include resistance exercises. The search led to a total of 17 RCTs, which included information on 1,705 patients with an average age of 63.5 years. Investigators than analyzed each of these studies and then compared their findings with one another to identify similarities and trends. Resistance exercise found to reduce pain, relieve stiffness and improve function Results showed that resistance exercise led to significant benefits when compared to control treatments. In particular, these types of exercises were found to reduce pain, relieve stiffness and improve overall function for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Further analysis showed that exercises with a higher intensity led to greater improvements in pain and function than those that were performed at a lower intensity. Based on these findings, it appears that utilizing resistance exercises can be beneficial in a number of ways for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Common exercises that may be helpful in this capacity include seated leg presses, leg extensions, leg curls and hip adduction and abduction exercises. Many physical therapists typically use these types of exercises when treating this group of patients, and those with the condition should, therefore, seek out their services in order to achieve an outcome that will help them move and function more easily. -As reported in the October '16 issue of Clinical Rehabilitation http://dlvr.it/Q05Zbr
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Single Best Thing For Your Health: Single Best Thing For Your Health Here is our latest monthly video. http://dlvr.it/PzvydN
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Program reduces rate of diabetes: Obesity-related problems represent a national health crisis that must be addressed Obesity, along with many other diseases related to it, is a major health crisis in the U.S. that requires a lo of effective efforts to address. Almost 2/3 of Americans are currently overweight or obese, which is a figure that has increased by more than 10% within the past decade and is only expected to keep growing. As a result, more than 300,000 people die every year due to obesity and obesity-related diseases like diabetes, even though obesity is the second leading cause of an illness that can be prevented. For this reason, several medical organizations have developed specific programs designed to decrease the rate of obesity and diabetes in the country, but not all programs have been successful in achieving or sustaining their goals. To better guide medical professionals who deal with these types of patients, a paper was released that highlighted the most effective characteristics of one of these prevention programs and offered advice on how to follow it. Program created by team of experts Metabolic syndrome, also known as insulin resistance syndrome, is a cluster of health issues that collectively increase the odds for developing heart disease and diabetes. It's either caused or worsened by consuming more calories than the amount burned and not getting enough exercise. Approximately 34% of the adult population currently has metabolic syndrome, which means lots of individuals could benefit from programs that prevent diabetes. With this in mind, a team of experts that included doctors, nurses and nutritionists developed the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) intensive lifestyle intervention program called "Lifestyle Balance." A total of 3,234 individuals participated in the DPP study, all of which were overweight and had impaired glucose tolerance. Mediterranean diet, 10,000 steps and increased physical activity The first part of the program consisted of 16 sessions led by a lifestyle coach, with the first eight dedicated to education, diet and exercise, and the other eight focused on how to overcome the challenges that might get in the way of making changes. The nutritional component of the program consisted of a 24-week Mediterranean-style diet. This encouraged participants to eat lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, poultry, and fish, with a breakdown of about 45-50% carbohydrates, 15% protein and 35-40% fat. Monounsaturated fats like olive oil were encouraged, while saturated fats were discouraged. For physical activity, participants were encouraged to get at least 150 minutes each week of moderate-intensity physical activities like brisk walking. In addition, all participants were told to wear a pedometer (step-counter) and increase the number of steps they walked each week until averaging 10,000 steps per day. The two major goals of the program were to have all participants reduce their weight by at least 7% and maintain a reasonable level of physical activity every week. Program is effective for reducing the rate of diabetes On the whole, DPP was found to be effective, as there was a 58% reduction in the rate of diabetes that developed in study participants compared to groups that received placebo or medications only. In addition, many of the patients from the initial study participated in a separate follow-up study, and their diabetes rates were once again found to be lower than groups in which only diabetes medications or no treatments were given to patients. When this approach was analyzed, it was also found to be more effective for its cost than other possible treatments and no treatments. Finally, researchers point out that following this type of prevention program will not only reduce the rate for diabetes but also improve the quality of life of patients. This paper shows just how effective a diabetes prevention program can be that includes dietary changes and increases in physical activity. Therefore, individuals who are classified as being prediabetic should strongly consider participating in a program similar to the one described here. Physical therapists can play a major part in this prevention process by offering specific recommendations to increase physical activity levels that are appropriate for each patient and addressing any limitations that may be preventing them from becoming more active. Doing so can significantly reduce the rate of diabetes in the country and ease the burden that the disease causes for so many. -As reported in the September '16 issue of Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation http://dlvr.it/Pz3mJ1
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Recipe Wednesday - Mediterranean Kabobs: Doesn't that make your mouth water? Click here for this great recipe! http://dlvr.it/Pyhls5
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