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Iridescent Publishing
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We publish FICTION to explore greater truths. We publish NONFICTION to explore myths and fallacies.
We publish FICTION to explore greater truths. We publish NONFICTION to explore myths and fallacies.

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#Ecology #H20 | Liquid assets: how the business of bottled water went mad

‘Over the past two decades, bottled water has become the fastest-growing drinks market in the world. The global market was valued at $157bn in 2013, and is expected to reach $280bn by 2020. Last year, in the UK alone, consumption of water drinks grew by 8.2%, equating to a retail value of more than £2.5bn. Sales of water are 100 times higher than in 1980. Of water: a substance that, in developed countries, can be drunk for free from a tap without fear of contracting cholera. What is going on? [...]’ — Sophie Elmhirst, The Guardian: http://buff.ly/2dgFd6P
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#Review #Literature: Travels in Elysium

“This book contains the most stunning use of metaphors I have ever read… Suspense rips through the pages at times seeming to drop you in mid air… an original adventure, an #Atlantis fantasy that will carry you far away from all things normal, regular, scheduled and predictable.” — Sylvia Wadlington, reviewing Travels in Elysium: http://buff.ly/2dPlAnB
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#Review #Archaeology #Literature | Metaphysical Atlantis

"William Azuski [...] is wise enough to realise that the #Atlantis of our imagination has had far more influence on humanity than any physical lost continent. Thus, while set in an archaeological dig, his superbly-crafted novel deals in metaphysics rather than middens and presents itself as a vivid, intelligent and often mystifying thriller that gradually poses profound questions about the nature of reality and the human condition. One to get you thinking, then keep you guessing from first to last." — bestselling novelist Herbie Brennan, author of The Atlantis Enigma, reviewing Travels in Elysium (Iridescent Publishing): http://buff.ly/2deqrxP
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#Review #SummerReads | Travels in Elysium by William Azuski

“Every classical Greek story should begin as a journey and this book offers a fine one [bringing] the reader right into a wonderful fantasy: what if you were able to join a major #archaeological expedition? … as a 'summer read’ … the book will delight.” — James Ellsworth, Vine Voice reviewer, Amazon: http://buff.ly/2deqDx9
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#Archaeology | Fake antiquities flood out of Syria as smugglers fail to steal masterpieces amid the chaos of war

In the National Museum of Damascus are antique books of black magic or witchcraft listing curses and spells designed to dumbfound or destroy whatever enemy is targeted by the user. Alongside these tattered works lie a bible made out of copper, religious works from the Crusader period and, elsewhere in the museum, a striking stone statue of a falcon. These look like impressive survivals from Syria’s past, but in reality all are fakes confiscated from smugglers on their way out of the country for sale to foreign customers and dealers. — Patrick Cockburn, The Independent: http://buff.ly/2bXPo1O
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The Fierce, Forgotten Library Wars of the Ancient World

In the Hellenistic Era—that's 323 BC to 31 BC, for all you numbers fans—the Library of Alexandria, Egypt was a research hub of high prestige. But while certainly the largest of its time and the most famous, the Library of Alexandria wasn’t the only institution of its kind. Libraries throughout the ancient world competed to be the best Greek library, in rivalries that proved as dangerous and unscrupulous as actual wars. — Atlas Obscura: http://buff.ly/2bwM28J

Ancient libraries in literary fiction: Travels in Elysium by William Azuski (Iridescent Publishing): http://buff.ly/2bwMune
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#Conservation | The tribes paying the brutal price of conservation

For the past 20 years, the San have been systematically stripped of their homes, land and culture. In a series of heavy-handed evictions, houses have been burned, schools and health centres closed, and water supplies cut off. Now these people live, dispossessed, on the edge of the huge game park, forbidden to hunt in or enter the land they have lived on sustainably for centuries. — The Guardian: http://buff.ly/2bvI7aR
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Ancient Greece's restored Tower of Winds keeps its secrets

Beneath it is a frieze of eight Anemoi – wind gods of Greek mythology – each facing a different direction. And beneath that, lines of a sundial. The greatest mystery remains how the clock worked at night. Based on the most prominent theory, a hydraulic mechanism powered a water clock device with water flowing from a stream on the Acropolis hill. [...] — Kathimerini: http://buff.ly/2bHmmWe
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Literary fiction readers understand others' emotions better, study finds

Literary fiction by the likes of Salman Rushdie, Harper Lee and Toni Morrison helps improve readers’ understanding of other people’s emotions, according to new research – but genre writing, from authors including Danielle Steel and Clive Cussler, does not. — http://buff.ly/2biQSSO
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Fear of the light: why we need darkness

Light pollution conceals true darkness from 80% of Europe and North America. What do we lose when we can no longer see the stars? — http://buff.ly/2c1AuKA
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