The trouble with pseudo educated half-wits complaining about grammar, like +Kyle Wien, is that they have no idea what grammar is. 90% of the things they complain about are spelling problems. The rest is a mishmash of half-remembered objections from their grade school teacher who got them from some other grammar bigot who doesn't know their tense from their time.

I've got news to you Kyle! People who spell they're, there and their interchangeably know the grammar of their use. They just don't differentiate their spelling. It's called homophony, dude, and English is chock full of it. Look it up. If your desire rose as you smelled a rose, you encountered homphony. Homophony is ubiquitousus feature of all languages. And equally all languages have some high profile homophones that cause trouble for spelling nazis but almost never for actual understanding - why, because when you speak, there is no spelling.

Kyle thinks that what he calls "good grammar" is indicative of attention to detail. Hard to say since he, presumably always perfectly "grammatical", failed to pay attention to the little detail of the difference between spelling and grammar. The other problem is, that I'm sure that Kyle and his ilk would be hard pressed to list more than a dozen or so of these "problems". So his "attention to detail" should really be read as "attention to the few details of language use that annoy Kyle Wien". He claims to have noticed a correlation in his practice but forgive me if I don't take his word for it. Once you have developed a prejudice, no matter how outlandish, it is dead easy to find plenty of evidence in its support (not paying attention to any of the details that disconfirm it).

Sure there's something to the argument that spelling mistakes in a news item, a blog post or a business newsletter will have an impact on its credibility. But hardly enough to worry about. Not that many people will notice and those who do will have plenty of other cues to make a better informed judgment. If a misplaced apostrophe is enough to sway them, then either they're not convinced of the credibility of the source in the first place, or they're not worth keeping as a customer. Journalists and bloggers engage in so many more significant pursuits that damage their credibility, like fatuous and unresearched claims about grammar, so that the odd it's/its slip up can hardly make much more than (or is it then) a dent.

Sorry, was this a rant?

http://lifehacker.com/5930680/i-wont-hire-people-who-use-poor-grammar-heres-why
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