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Missing e
299 followers -
The unofficial browser extension for Tumblr
The unofficial browser extension for Tumblr

299 followers
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Are you one of the 850,000+ downloads of +Missing e?

Have you gotten more out of Tumblr thanks to +Missing e?

Nominate Missing e for a Shorty Award in the #apps category!

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"Third-party extensions and hacks are a part of the web, perhaps Tumblr should focus on building new features or its own official 'app store' instead of whining about support and server issues." +Drew Olanoff nails it.

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Screenshots of Missing e in action!
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"The sad thing is that Apple is providing a bad example for younger, smaller companies like Twitter and Tumblr, who apparently want to control the “user experience” of their platforms in much the same way as Apple does. They feel they have a better sense of quality than the randomness of a free market….

Tumblr has decided that a browser add-on is unwelcome. Presumably it’s only an issue because a fair number of their users want to use it. So they are taking issue not only with the developer, but with the users. They have admitted that the problem is that they must “educate” their users better. Oy! Does this sound familiar. In the end, it will be the other way around. It has to be. It’s the lesson of the Internet."

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"The browser extension, Missing e… modifies the look and feel of Tumblr to add several new features — something that Tumblr has taken issue with for months…. This puts Tumblr, known for its stance on SOPA as a champion of user rights, in a bit of an awkward position: In this case, it’s the entity seeking to block access to a popular and by all accounts useful piece of software.

The result, it seems, is a return to the age-old tension between users’ desire to get more out of a platform than it was designed to offer and a platform’s need to control its product. We’ve seen it with Twitter, Dave Winer notes, we’ve seen it with Facebook, and now we’re seeing it with Tumblr."
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