Profile

Cover photo
Solomon Eraut
Lives in Lynnwood
11,425 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Solomon Eraut

Shared publicly  - 
 
This seems like a useful graphic...
1
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Discussion  - 
 
Lubuntu seems to need a forum of its own. On the Lubuntu website,the tab "forum" links to Ubuntu Forums posts that have the tag "lubuntu." (That is to say, go to http://www.lubuntu.net/ and click forum, you'll see http://ubuntuforums.org/tags.php?tag=lubuntu )

I upgraded to Ubuntu 13.10 with Lubuntu 13.10. The upgrade seems to have only broken some things, not added any features that I notice. I don't want to post negative things about Lubuntu, that people who don't use Lubuntu might read, when maybe there's an easy way to fix them, or maybe there's nothing wrong. So I guess I have to post about it here. Please excuse me and correct me if there's a better place to post about it.

Two problems in 13.10:

(1) The panel right click option titled "Desktop Pager" Settings crashes every time. There were dialog boxes that sent automated bug reports on it. After the first time it crashes in a session, it crashes silently or does nothing, i.e. it doesn't bring up another bug report dialog box. I found there are already bug reports on this at Launchpad. I don't know how to do manual bug reports at Launchpad, although I'd like to learn how to contribute there. Running "$ obconf --tab 6" reproduces the segmentation fault bug every time, although "$ obconf --tab 1" works, (with error messages that might not be important because at least some of them are just from bad data in usr/share/*/openbox-3/themerc files.)

(2) Two options from the Shutdown menu, Lock Screen and Suspend, now do something different than they used to: They each log out of Lubuntu, just like the Logout option. Then the Suspend option does suspend, after a second, interrupting the sound of arriving at the log-in screen. Are these options in Lubuntu Shutdown supposed to do this in version 13.10?
2
Andre Rodovalho's profile photoSolomon Eraut's profile photoIberê Fernandes's profile photoBen Parrish's profile photo

Solomon Eraut

Shared publicly  - 
 
After three days of using Windows 8, I'm not having too much trouble with it, now that I've lowered my expectations about the Start screen so that I'm just trying to stay in desktop mode and use shortcuts lined up on the desktop and some built-in apps pinned to the taskbar, which is how power users are supposed to use it according to defenders of it. Another flaw in Windows 8 is that Internet Explorer 10 in it doesn't have ClearType (Microsoft's subpixel rendering) so I installed Google's Chrome browser free so I can view web pages with higher resolution for fonts, the way everyone with older computers sees the Internet.

I'm not a typical product reviewer and I'm not trying to be. I'm more critical than others because I started using computers in the 80s for programming more than for anything else. So I don't give any slack about user interface inefficiencies that could be fixed by changing a word or two in what the interface displays, since I know that's so much easier to change in a program than the bulk of how it works. What I'm trying to achieve, if possible, is not constructive criticism of Microsoft, but a view of what's going on in current computing and what the ultimate purpose of computers is that will allow me to contribute to the programming world, and allow me to know where to contribute that will do some good.

Maybe Linux will become the new normal in personal computers, other than minor entertainment devices, through adoption by businesses that are forward looking about technology and by businesses that want to be able to keep things the same instead of having recurring upgrade costs.

Maybe computers should be abolished. The idea of that possibility sounds crackpot, like Jerry Mander's Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television. Eventually technology will change or people will do something different. Something that's only been around for a few decades shouldn't be expected to be around forever by default. I don't mean that though. I mean maybe people should on purpose not use computers. Not stopping other people from using them by force, but just finding something else to do.
1
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Discussion  - 
 
Must buy a new desktop computer today, that reliably loads Ubuntu and other distros, and has a 3-generation i5, and is a good value under $1000. The Alienware X51 seems like the only possibility. Are there any other suggestions?

[Fine print for those who would argue that a new computer reliably loading Ubuntu is an easy thing to find: Take for example the HP ENVY h8-1520t, please. In addition to whatever problems an individual would have installing Ubuntu in the past, there are UEFI problems that can take several steps to work around, possibly disabling fans and melting down, then simply go online and apt-get and compile an Atheros 8161 LAN driver to get your wired Internet working. Another new computer I looked at had its installation thread marked "solved" because the owner gave up.]
3
1
C. Anthony Esposito II's profile photoIchini Shichi's profile photoTosin Atolagbe's profile photoLuna Wolf's profile photo
25 comments
 
+C. Anthony Esposito II I'm sorry about implying that you suggested something incompatible. Actually Ubuntu 13.04 has the driver for wired Internet for the Atheros AR8161, which is on the GA-ZZ7X-D3H motherboard, and also on the different motherboard of the HP Envy h8-1520t and a lot of other computers.

An Ubuntu user installing Arch Linux was surprised that the driver wasn't included in Arch, and ended up buying a new Ethernet card to work around the problem. Source:

https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=160728

There's an open bug in that alx driver, but it only affects someone with an ASUSTek P8H77-V, so I'll avoid that board instead. Source:

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1176108
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Discussion  - 
 
I'm trying to refactor a project to have more classes, instead of less which was what I did with it before. NetBeans has this message "Warning: It is highly recommended that you do not place Java classes in the default package." So my questions is: What exactly is the "default package"? How will I know the default package when I see it? How will I know a package when I see it? All I know is that under Project Properties, there are lists titled "Package Folder" and "Label", but I don't see any "default package" listed there.
1
Rafa Botero's profile photoSolomon Eraut's profile photoRoberto Burgos's profile photo
15 comments
 
+Solomon Eraut Getting back to the subject, the most important thing about packages is organization, and being organize is a very powerful concept in and outside the programmer's world, and in every aspect of life. As the files in any folder grow, you will find the need to categorize them so that you can find easier at a later time. Another powerful thing about packages is that you can have two classes with the same name in different packages, and you can choose which of these you rather use by pointing to the appropriate package.
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Shared publicly  - 
 
I decided I should follow the idea that real programmers use real name accounts online, to get credit for what they do. I'm hoping to get into programming or something like that, and anyway dividing my online activity up between different handles and nicknames hasn't been getting me anywhere. Google+ was acting like my name was "Sonny Moonie" because those were my nicknames that I was using online already. So now I'm going to change my Google+ account to having my name Solomon Eraut. According to the instructions for a Google+ name change, it won't change the name on old posts. I don't know what the rest of the effects will be, but here goes.
1
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Shared publicly  - 
 
I posted something at Medium, from the excitement of signing in there and getting to write in a nice font and drinking some tea. It seems like a lot of nonsense, but it makes me think about what's going on with the way people spend time on the Internet now. (This message is to be polite in case anyone who was following me wanted some content or an update on what I was doing.)
1
Solomon Eraut's profile photoBill Reed's profile photo
5 comments
 
+Bill Reed I have to admit you're right. Thousands of readers would be fine, but there would have to be a much smaller group of editors who don't have allow every post that follows the rules, in order to prevent overflow and keep quality up.
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'd better update here in case anyone looks at my page and thinks that's my final opinion on computer things.

I installed the Lubuntu desktop as an add-on to Ubuntu. I like the Lubuntu interface because it has a start menu organized by subjects, instead of having to search the computer for apps every time I want to use something else, and instead of being less informed about how many things are already installed in each subject area. Lubuntu has an easy to use multiple-desktop feature, so I can act like I'm using multiple monitors with windows of open programs spread out across them.

I still sometimes use Ubuntu with the default Unity interface, or Windows 8 to see different things.

I've got NetBeans and Python IDLE set up, and I'm considering what other tools to set up.

I'm conflicted about whether to try to do bugfixes in trivial games, which is something I see that I can do, because I notice bugs, and when I look in the source I can find where to work on fixing them. I'm conflicted because fixing games so they run smoothly and don't crash might contribute to people wasting more time playing trivial games. On the other hand, it would be a way for me to learn more about programming and get into contributing, and the developers who put the malfunctioning sections of code in those apps might appreciate being corrected before they try coding the same way on any program that's actually important.
2
Bill Reed's profile photo
 
The history of programing is crowded with examples of ideas that started from a desire for better games.
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm trying Ubuntu 13.04 on a flash drive, and my first impression is that it's even less user friendly than Windows 8. If I didn't already know how to use Firefox, and hadn't put into  Google: user instructions for ubuntu 13.04, I wouldn't have found the Official Ubuntu Documentation that told me how to find the list of apps that are already installed.

I just found out that the menu titles that appear on the top line of the screen apply as the menu of the window that's most in front of others on the screen. That means menus are disconnected from the programs they were designed as parts of, and it's another thing to keep in short term memory when trying to use the interface, instead of whatever a person is trying to work on. As a snap judgment, I'd say this interface is not a practical choice for a programmer or writer.
1
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Shared publicly  - 
 
A review of Windows 8, the latest Microsoft "operating system"

Yesterday my new computer was delivered and I set it up. I chose one that came with Windows 8, because the amount of new hardware was good for the money, and I thought it might be educational for my computer use to try the latest Microsoft thing before installing operating systems that have better reviews by casual computer users and better options for advanced users.

The Weather app that comes with it and the Accuweather app installed by the computer's manufacturer, Lenovo, both had to be corrected on my location, at an expense of hours learning how to do it, while learning how to switch between a browser where I search for instructions and read them and applying the instructions on things that go full-screen automatically.

The Video app that comes with it doesn't play videos the way any normal person would demand. It puts a progress bar and title over the video that won't go away.

The Music app doesn't play music files or CDs, it's just a link to using streaming radio, from Xbox only, not whatever streaming channel you want, and you have to sign up for it, and it plays in lower than CD quality, despite being digital-rights managed so that it's not recordable.

I played half of a CD yesterday, the Beatles' Abbey Road, to test my audio set up. It played using the free trial player called CyberLink installed by Lenovo. Then today when I started up the computer, I was at a loss how to make the CD start playing again using anything Windows 8 specific, despite reading several help pages about the subject online. I started the CD with the free trial player again, then continued reading about it.

Here are Microsoft's instructions for finding and opening Windows Media Player in Windows 8:

1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search.)

2. Enter Windows Media Player in the search box, tap or click Apps, and then tap or click Windows Media Player.

What I discovered was that opening "Search" stops the currently playing CD, and leaving "Search" starts it again.

It takes twice as many mouse movements and clicks to open and close programs as in Windows XP or Lubuntu (a simpler version of Ubuntu.)

I turned off spelling autocorrect and underline misspelled words in the settings, after some searching on how to do that, and it still autocorrects spelling and underlines words that aren't misspelled but are simply words or brand names it doesn't know or approve.

This Windows 8 "operating system" is malformed and harmful, and no one should use it.
3
Solomon Eraut's profile photoBill Reed's profile photo
3 comments
 
By the way, I also strongly recommend not using the CyberLink PowerDVD player with Windows 8, because somehow long pauses get inserted between the tracks playing, which makes CDs that have songs that segue between tracks like Abbey Road play totally wrong. Windows Media Player doesn't come with DVD playing capability. So I have an expensive new computer without any good media players or control of interruptions, and the free players that I might get to fix this problem work better in Linux because they were originally made for Linux.
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Shared publicly  - 
 
#ifihadglass  I wouldn't use the camera feature, since I already know where I am and what's around me. Instead I'd try to customize the display to show useful information, like the precise time, and I'd try to move the display to a more convenient place, like my wrist.
2
Bill Reed's profile photo
 
Like #IfIHadAWatch ... brilliant!
Add a comment...

Solomon Eraut

Discussion  - 
 
I'm trying to get Java running in Linux. (Lubuntu 12.04) I installed NetBeans 7.0.1, and Java 7. (The package came with Java 6. So I had to install Java 7 too, then because I was getting illegal version errors, I had to run "$update-alternatives --config java" and "update-alternatives --config javac" and select the 7 versions.)

Now I'm getting:
error msg:javax.sound.midi.MidiUnavailableException: Can not open line

It seems like maybe I'm supposed to set some "policy" using the Policy Tool, so that Java has audio permission, but I have no idea what any of these things are: a policy, a keystore, a principal, or Kerberos. I just started reading these terms a few minutes ago when I ran into this problem, and I don't know if I'll ever know enough about them even to figure out if this is the right direction to go for solving the problem, let alone set it up to work.

If I, the writer of the program, can't get it to run on Linux, what chance is there for other users?
1
Jakub Konieczny's profile photoSolomon Eraut's profile photo
8 comments
 
Solved. Uninstalled Pulse Audio and put the sound.properties file to using com.sun.media.sound.DirectAudioDeviceProvider again. No crackles. Lubuntu can't handle the Pulse Audio driver very well. I guess other distros do better at Pulse Audio, or there wouldn't be so many people using it.

I'm realizing that good sound applications in Java should include instructions for users to get over the sort of problems I experienced. I thought maybe I could make the project I'm trying to fork better than that, ditch the help instructions, which are obsolete anyway, and "just work" and "run anywhere" instead, but it's not that easy.
Add a comment...
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Lynnwood
Links
Basic Information
Gender
Male