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Lars Clausen
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Where giants go to play... Mozart.
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I'm guessing from the looks of the overall picture, the crazy size of it, and the lack of any search results about it, that it's a conceptual image.
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I find it fascinating that the shape of the test extrusion seems to reflect the quality of the extrusion.
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A fine piece of machinery.
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With a bit of help from the sewing room.
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For map nerds: How hard can it be to find out if your capitol area has a coastline? Pretty hard, it turns out, if you're in Australia.
 
Fun project for +Anthony Baxter and I today: trying to work out, once and for all, if the ACT has a coastline.

For you non-Australians: the ACT is the Australian Capital Territory. The place where Canberra is. Think DC in the USA; there are many similarities, including the fact that states donated land to carve out a neutral HQ for the national capital. (Side note: you may see references to the FCT, or Federal Capital Territory, in some of the stuff linked below. It's the same place; it was renamed along the way.)

You'd think "does a federal subdivision have a coastline" would be an easy question to answer. You'd be so, so, so wrong. This is a pub trivia kind of question in Australia; the problem is, most people get it wrong. At best, they get it right, but for the wrong reasons. Like, maybe it does have a coastline, but not the one they think.

At least 3 Wikipedia pages cover the topic. Each of them give different answers to the question.

Regardless, this is a fascinating geopolitical quirk. So here's what we know:

Easy answer: no, it's inland

This is the answer you get when you look up 'Australian Capital Territory' in your favourite online map site, or (heaven forfend) a paper atlas. The ACT is landlocked, as any fule no (cf. http://www.cmd.act.gov.au/__data/assets/image/0004/117526/Australia_map_downsized.jpg). Obviously it doesn't have a coastline, some will say.

These people are wrong.

Pub trivia answer: yes, on Jervis Bay

Some background. When the various states federated into the Commonwealth of Australia (1901), Australia didn't have a capital per se. Melbourne acted as capital, with the promise that they'd sort a real one out later. In 1908,  the Seat of Government Act was passed, which basically said "we're going to build something in the Yass-Canberra area, the New South Wales government will give us some land once we've worked out somewhere mutually agreeable". The interesting part is the quote "The territory to be granted to or acquired by the Commonwealth for the Seat of Government shall contain an area not less than nine hundred square miles, and have access to the sea." (emphasis mine). The astute amongst you will note, from your maps, that the "district of Yass-Canberra" is nowhere near the sea. No problem, New South Wales will carve out another bit, on the sea, and pony that over too. The land they chose was at Jervis Bay (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jervis_Bay), a bay due more-or-less east of Canberra.

So, people say, this land they carved out (you can see it on a map!) is actually part of the ACT. It does have a coast!

These people are wrong.

Advanced double-bluff pub trivia answer: no, Jervis Bay isn't part of the ACT

The next (correct) argument is that the thing at Jervis Bay is not part of the ACT; it's part of the Jervis Bay Territory (JBT), a completely separate part of Australia. This is fairly startling to many Australians; we are all taught that Australia has 6 states (NSW, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia, Tasmania) and 2 mainland territories (Northen Territory and the ACT). But this isn't true; there are three mainland territories. Jervis Bay Territory is, legally, exactly like the other two: an independent top-level division of Australia. Finding out there's a third territory is startling for many Australians: it would be like if the US actually had 51 states, but no-one ever bothered to mention, say, a South Rhode Island. Anyway, it's true. Legally, in Australia, JBT is just like the ACT. The difference is: it's smaller, almost no-one lives there, and lots of people have never heard of it. But that's irrelevant.

Really quite advanced pub trivia answer: the Jervis Bay Territory is PART of the ACT, so yes

This is wrong, as stated above. But people believe it, because of one key fact: the JBT doesn't have a government. Because almost no-one lives there, giving it a government is kind of wasteful. So the ACT administers it. That is, the laws of the ACT apply; commit a crime there, you're tried in the ACT courts. Live there, you vote for the ACT government. But the law is clear; it's as if it's part of the ACT, but it's not. This is an administrative convenience.

Exhausted and confused person answer: so it's no then?

Ahahaha. No.

Epic map nerd smart arse answer: yes, but not the one you're thinking of.

Ahh. Here's where we get really tricky. All that stuff above? You know where I said the "pub trivia answer" people who said "yes" were wrong? Well, they're very possibly right. But for the wrong reasons. There's a completely separate parcel of land, also on Jervis Bay, which may well be part of the ACT.

Look at Bing Maps (no, really): http://binged.it/1nngW39. The Jervis Bay Territory (NOT part of the ACT, as established above) is the thing outlined in green. But that's irrelevant to us. Look north-east of there. See the land at the north headland of Jervis Bay? That's the Beecroft Peninsula. This is in fact the bit of land that may be part of the ACT.

Cadastral surveying nerd answer: a-ha! That's not part of Commonwealth land; Beecroft peninsula is merely leased to to Commonwealth by NSW! So no!

Oh-ho, cadastral surveying nerd, hold up. I'm not talking about all of Beecroft peninsula. In the majority, you're right. But there's one part where I'm not sure you are. See http://i.imgur.com/giylEo1.jpg - I'm not saying A or B are part of the ACT. All I'm talking about is C: the land given to the ACT under the Seat of Government Acts of 1908 and 1922.

That land is part of the Jervis Bay Territory too! So no!

No, it's not. This is actually really quite clear. The Jervis Bay Territory Acceptance Act 1915 (https://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/C2004C00038; hereafter JBTA) makes it clear what's part of the JBT. See "The Schedule". Following the descriptions is complicated, but this describes the parcel of land on the south headland. It mentions nothing about the North one. 

If your argument is based around the JBTA: nope, it's not in there.

If you argument is that a subsequent piece of legislation post-JBTA has changed it: [citation needed], as I'm not aware of any.

THE LAW

So, let's look at the law. There are a few relevant parts here, beyond the ones we've already discussed.

There's the Seat of Government Acceptance Act 1909 (https://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/C2004C00608). This was actually two acts: this one, and a corresponding one from the NSW Government, the Seat Of Government Surrender Act 1909. That is, NSW passed an act surrendering the land; the Commonwealth passed one accepting it. Each was conditional on the other; both were passed and both came into effect. This does cover the north headland; for example, "Eastern Division, Land District of Nowra, County of St. Vincent, Parish of Beecroft, area five hundred and thirty‑one acres. The Crown lands within the following boundaries: Commencing on the High Water Mark of Jervis Bay at Longnose Point, and bounded thence on the east by that High Water Mark and the right bank of Duck Creek generally northerly to the road leading to Point Perpendicular Light House, thence by that road, generally westerly and north‑westerly to the High Water Mark of Jervis Bay at a wharf, and thence generally on the west and south by that High Water Mark southerly and easterly to the point of commencement. Plan Misc. 1393 Sy." (Yes, it's ALL like this. Gripping). I chose this example deliberately: the lighthouse is recognisably on the north headland, so you know that's where they're talking about. If you follow up on the others, they all seem to be on the north too (with one exception, but let's not go there).

There's the Seat of Government Acceptance Act 1922 (https://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/C2004C00609; again, there's a corresponding NSW act). This complicates things, but then again… it doesn't. It does because it defines a whole new set of land parcels; it doesn't, because it's the same set. This exists only because _"certain errors and misdescriptions exist in the descriptions of lands set forth in [SoGA 1909]". That is, it's covering the same stuff, but more precisely. Nothing (really) to see here.

There's the Jervis Bay Territory Acceptance Act 1915; the one I cited above. I've already said this is irrelevant; what complicates it a tiny bit is that the corresponding NSW state act was called Seat of Government Surrender Act 1915. Ignore that, it's nothing to do with the Seat of Government. It's totally seperate. They just, like… copied and pasted the name of the 1909 state act, or something. Ignore it.

There's the Australian Capital Territory (Self‑Government) Act 1988 (https://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/C2014C00617): this is the act that gave the ACT the right to make its own laws. This should be useful, but… it's not. Its entire definition of the actual boundaries of the ACT is "Territory: (a)  when used in a geographical sense, means the Australian Capital Territory". That's really helpful, you bastards.

As far as I can tell, that's all the legislation that's relevant. 

So, my answer: as far as I can tell, it's unambiguously part of the ACT. It was ceded in 1909 (and clarified in 1922). These acts, as far as I can tell, are the best source we have for defining the boundary of the ACT. If there are other sources, I don't know them.

To address some likely objections:

"The Jervis Bay Territory Act says…" I'll stop you right there. Irrelevant; these acts don't cover the north headland. Ignore JBT, it's a red herring.

"This map says…" Maps don't actually define boundaries. This is an obscure point of geopolitics: it's obvious that many maps don't bother to get it right. Even government maps: we know some of them get it wrong, because many of them disagree. They can't all be right. So which ones are?

"The boundaries have changed since the 1909 Act" [citation needed]. Where? Give me a source dammit.

"NSW ceded the land, and the Commonwealth accepted it. But they didn't make it part of the ACT; it's now just regular Crown [commonwealth-owned] land" Great, good argument. But where is it defined which bits are part of the ACT? Again, [citation needed]. If not the act, find me a source.

In conclusion: damn, I need a stiff drink.

No, wait.

In conclusion: I'm pretty sure it is part of the ACT. But it's deeply murky, and not only do the three goverments seem to disagree on the exact state of this land, but individual sources from the same government do.

Geopolitics is fun!
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Software people, this is for you. And I love it so much.
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I don't have time to write an explainer for this, so you'll just have to settle for the raw news. Short version: In the past few months, a large number of street kids, mostly refugees from Morocco, have been living near Stockholm's main train station. The police have been wanting more powers to get rid of them, but haven't gotten much. Last week, they announced that the main train station was now "unsafe" and had been "taken over" by said street children. 

Yesterday, a group of about 200 masked men stormed the station, distributing leaflets and beating anyone who "didn't look Swedish." This action was coordinated by the NMR (a local Nazi group), and a follow-up rally was held this morning in Stockholm by the SDP (a far-right party, think the Swedish version of Donald Trump). 

Police made no attempt to stop the attack. Three people were arrested, one for punching a plainclothes cop, another for possession of brass knuckles; all have been released. The official police statement is that they "could not confirm that violent attacks took place.”

For a little context, the presence of far-right groups and their readiness for actions like these is not even remotely secret, and the police statement that the area was now unsafe and there was nothing they can do was widely read as a coded message that vigilantes were welcome. (There's a whole history of complicated interplays between Swedish police, the local and national government, and these groups, with "if you don't let us do something, I guess it'll just have to be them" being a classic negotiating tactic)

Important notes here are the extreme coordination of the group (200 people showing up on schedule, dressed in black with balaclavas, literature ready to distribute, and ready for an organized attack), and the tacit cooperation of the police.

NB that violence against immigrants, Muslims, and Jews has been on a sharp rise across all of Europe, and far-right parties have been making significant political inroads, but this is the first highly coordinated attack. Earlier attacks have primarily been by small groups (3-5 people) on individuals, and haven't shown signs of organization, uniforms, etc.

There's lots more that could (and should) be written here, to give context about just why there were so many refugees living there, the six-month ramp-up of the conflict, and the political shifts within Sweden and more broadly within Europe as a result, but I'll have to leave those for someone else to write.

Useful additional coverage: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/sweden/12131460/swedish-far-right-migrant-attack-stockholm.html

(And yes, I realize that I just linked the Daily Mail as the primary source below. Going through English-language coverage of the story, theirs was actually the most thoroughly researched and informative, and didn't have any egregious biases that I could spot. Damned if I know why their coverage was the best, but it was. Normally the Mail is mostly suitable for wrapping fish in.)
A mob of black-clad masked men went on a rampage in and around Stockholm's main train station last night targeting refugees. At least three people were beaten up, according to witnesses.
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The first time I find something that could be considered a design flaw by +nop head. But it's fixable, once I get the printer to a state where a new fan mount could be printed.
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Little Linux horrors.
Version 2.10 of glibc was released in May of 2009. XML was already a dirty word when built-in support was added to a library loaded by (nearly) every program running on linux machines. It gets better. The malloc_info() function is designed to address deficiencies in malloc_stats(3) and ...
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Programmer. Swordfighter. Photographer. Reprapper. Enjoyer of fine marzipan.
Introduction
Google programmer by day, Viking warrior by weekend. When I put on my chain mail, all feels right in the world.
Bragging rights
Started 2 Belegarth realms
Work
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Programming, swordfighting (Belegarth style), photographing, boardgaming, plantgrowing, and hugging.
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Lars Clausen's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Top 10 Mistakes in Web Design
www.nngroup.com

The 10 most egregious UX offenses against users. Web design disasters and HTML horrors are legion, though many usability atrocities are less

If Carpenters Were Hired Like Programmers
www.dawood.in

Interviewer: So, you're a carpenter, are you? Carpenter: That's right, that's what I do. Interviewer: How long have you been doing it? Carpe

The Battle of Fort Frost
linefighting.blogspot.com

The following is based on a true story. Names and locations have been altered or omitted out of respect for the dead. Due to the graphic nat

Combined Scientific Efforts Find Unusual High-Temperature Superconductiv...
www.dumb-out.net

Combining their experience and efforts, scientists from several leading organizations have discovered a very unusual type of electronic orde

Watch the world's largest solar power plant being built
www.dailymail.co.uk

The Topaz Solar Farm (shown) has gone online in California's Carrizo Plain. The $2.5bn project spans 9.5 square miles and has nine million p

Pop Sonnets
popsonnet.tumblr.com

Old twists on new tunes, every Thursday.

Masters of Love
m.theatlantic.com

Science says lasting relationships come down to—you guessed it—kindness and generosity.

Toonhole | Sleeping Beauty
www.toonhole.com

Oh boy, do I know that feeling (^__^). Good one! Reply. Doomroar says: December 11, 2013 at 3:36 am. Looks like he is not that good at kissi

How To Conduct Your Own Google Ventures Design Sprint
www.fastcodesign.com

To mentor 150 startups in its portfolio Google Ventures developed a five-day design process. Here the methods mastermind Jake Knapp details

10 Shocking Photos of Fukushima Mutants
lamal.likes.com

Real life mutants from the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear meltdown.

Android is better
paulstamatiou.com

It was just meant to be a quick experiment. I started using a Nexus 4. I was going to go right back to my iPhone after a week. I was designi

Crashing the Teacup
repstrapdk.blogspot.com

Wired the Arduino back up after last time's oscilloscope adventures. Testing first with G1 [XYZE]nn commands, only X works. With homebrew fi

On Sexism in Publishing, or Why I'm Writing this Now Instead of Two Days...
delilahpaints.blogspot.com

Highly simplified, the reason is the same one that kept me from pressing charges against my rapist: because I was scared. When I read Ann Ag

BIG NEWS – Hands on with CONTINUOUS raw recording on Canon 5D Mark III |...
www.eoshd.com

http://vimeo.com/66033769 Huge thanks go to A1ex, g3gg0, 1% and the whole Magic Lantern team. I have no other words to describe it - this is

Why does America lose its head over 'terror' but ignore its daily gun de...
www.guardian.co.uk

Michael Cohen: The marathon bombs triggered a reaction that is at odds with last week's inertia over arms control

Had lunch here, it was really delicious, even my food connoisseur friend was raving about the Pfanzerl and Grießschmaltz. The service was excellent, better than most German restaurants (but that's a low bar).
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Always helpful and friendly. I came in to get some different size rivets, and instead of just making a sale, they diagnosed what I was doing wrong and helped me work better.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Most awesome Thai noodle bowl. Plus yummy spring rolls and other deliciousnesses.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
Really good burgers at quite reasonable prices, including regularly updated special burgers. If this place had been any more central, it would have been overrun.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
51 reviews
Map
Map
Map
They were closed at hour and a half after their stated opening hours. No explanation of any kind.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Nice riddles, good group experience.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Possibly the best Thai food in town. Pricey by my standards, but totally worth it, and fast & friendly service.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago