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Judy Gombita
Works at (Social) public relations and communication management strategist (solopreneur)
Attended University of Toronto
Lives in Toronto, ON, Canada
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I always find it amusing when there are articles about Google, and the G+ "share" button isn't topline. (This one is from +Bloomberg Business) :-) 
It takes a company to manage the billionaire’s money—and life
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Judy Gombita

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This is a better explanation (h/t +Melonie Fullick). c +Anjlee Bhatt  
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Agreed, much clearer and there certainly will be a lot of advantages of opening up twitter as a private messaging system.  Although, I still think we will see more issues with people mixing up public and private.
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Judy Gombita

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This is great! c +Tom Murphy (of Microsoft)  +Stephen Waddington (father of two daughters)
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Judy Gombita

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(Deliberately putting this on G+.... BTW, +Ann Handley, found out about this because of another #Newsle mention with your name):

Let’s play social network word association. How would you succinctly describe each network below?

+Jerod Morris answers:

Facebook – A double-edged sword. It’s a great place to connect, but you MUST guard against wasting time.

LinkedIn – A place I’m reconsidering

Twitter – A place most people go to talk, but a place smart people go to listen

Google+ – A place I no longer go very often

Vine – A place I’ve peeked into, but have not sustained interest in

Tumblr –­ A place I have found many, many hilarious GIFs

Snapchat – A place that reminds me how old I’ve become.

YouTube – An oldie, but ever a goodie. I want to do more here.

Instagram – A place I’ve given up trying to “figure out” and instead just enjoy

Pinterest – A place I’m sure I could do more, but with what time?

MySpace – Ah memories. :-)
Who is Jerod Morris?  I think that's an important question and one deserving of a public answer because if you're in the online marketing and especially, the podcasting world, you need to know Jer...
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G+ is a Google product...meaning if I am trying to track someone down (even if it's for her/his Twitter account), I'm more likely to find them here (or on LinkedIn). You're welcome, +Jerod Morris. I have my Newsle account connected to my LinkedIn contacts (only), and it seems to find lots of mentions of +Ann Handley. (Not that surprising, as she's pretty awesome. I've "known" Ann from way back to her +ClickZ Training days.)
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Judy Gombita

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 #PR
 
 
My guess is we won't have #PRredefined  until the C-suite gender composition more accurately reflects the overall industry (workforce).  A great (well-researched) article by  +Aarti Shah for +Holmes Report .
While women make up about 70% of the PR workforce, they only hold about 30% of the top positions in the industry.
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Do you think #selfies  are benign? According to Stewart Ewen (in the recent Museum of Public Relations-sponsored lecture), they are the symptom of a toxic environment. Toni Muzi Falconi reports on his (own) revelations post-event on +PR Conversations .
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On +Mashable (a great #CorparateCulture  story never gets old).
Mashable
How employers can attract top performers through company culture.
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Judy Gombita

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How can this be a good thing?!
Mashable
Twitter announced on Monday that all users will now have the option to receive direct messages from any other user.
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Difficult to say at this stage, but for individuals with smaller audiences or brands with large customer service teams, it might prove very useful.
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I count on +Mark Traphagen for a pragmatic (well-researched) take on the current state of G+; you should, too.
 
A Truly Awful Google+ Hatchet Job on Forbes Exposed

As some of you know, I've made it my policy for some time now not to waste time responding to the "Google+ is dead" articles that sprout up from time to time like weeds on a spring lawn. 

But the recent rash have been so bad, so poorly researched and argued, that I had to end my silence.

My next +Marketing Land column (which should publish next week, I think) deals with the main arguments in recent articles by +Larry Kim and +Travis Wright.

But in this post I'm commenting on a new Forbes post by Steve Denning titled "Five Reasons Why Google+ Died." In a response today +Mike Elgan dealt very well with a number of Denning's reasons, including a very bad misunderstanding of a quote by Elgan that Denning doesn't even correctly attribute. You can read Elgan's post at http://goo.gl/FH6DJ5.

I want to address a statistic quoted in the introduction of Denning's article. He quotes +Scott Galloway as stating that Google+ had a "97% decline in engagement rate, year over year." (The actual figure is 98%, as you'll see later, but that's the most inconsequential of Denning's errors.)

That's a pretty stunning claim. I wanted to see the actual study, where its data came from and its methodology. No context was given around the number.

In response to my comment on the Forbes article asking for that information, Denning referred me to a previous article of his, which linked to another article. That article had an embedded video of a talk by Galloway, in which he states the 98% drop in engagement as evidence that Google+ has failed, showing for a few seconds a bar chart with that stat.

But still no link to or citation of, in the article or video, whatever study this data came from. 

It took me almost an hour to track down the original study from which the "98% drop in engagement" comes, but eventually I found it.

It's at https://www.l2inc.com/research/social-platforms-2014. Turns out that L2 is Scott Galloway's own research company. 

The full report is for "members only." I entered my email address to get the download of the non-members version. It turns out to be only an excerpt, and does not contain the methodology or any details on how the data was obtained.

As far as I can discern, L2 looked at the social profiles of about 300 brands. So first off, this is only a study of brand profiles on social media.The study does not look at regular users at all. Which means to use it as a source to proclaim overall engagement is fallacious. 

When I dig down further in the excerpt, I saw that there was a lot more to the story.

Yes, of the 300 some brands they surveyed, Facebook is killing it. But if you look at the rest of the story, Google+ is doing at least as well as, and sometimes better than., the other secondary social networks. 

The ballyhooed "98% drop in engagement rate" (engagements per follower) occurred, according to the study, from July 2013 to July 2014. While that drop is  the worst among the networks surveyed, all of the networks had drops including Facebook, which dropped 13%. 

If you look at the other stats, you get a broader story. 

In the time period studied (again, July 2013 to July 2014), the surveyed brands increased followers on Google+ by 41% (compared to an increase for Facebook of 38%). Moreover, the absolute number of followers for Google+ was the highest of any network (960K, compared to FB's 781K).

Also, brand engagement per post went up 67% on Google+, while only 26% on Facebook. 

So you see, you can prove whatever you want, it just depends on which stat you choose.

And in this case, those numbers only apply to a very small sample of brand pages, not to all users of the networks, as the Forbes writer assumed.

These days I always want to add to these posts that I come neither to praise Google+ nor to bury it (sorry, Shakespeare!). I'm not going after this as a G+ fanboy, but simply because I hate misinformation.

UPDATE: With permission, I am adding on here an excellent comment left on the Forbes article by +David Amerland that very deftly deals with the five main "reasons" denning gave for why Google+ is dead. The following is David's complete comment:

Interesting points. Let’s take them in reverse: #5 – G+ is not a social network in the traditional sense of the word. It is a “social layer” (Google execs have specifically said this on a number of occasions) or more exact a set of tools used to socialize the web. There are a lot of new things within that: from HOAs (Hangouts On Air) to an ability to connect a real-world-business to a Google Map presence to a page, to real people profiles, to name but two.

#4 – From the outset Google said that G+ was not like Facebook and was never intended to be. No idea why this idea is perpetuated but obviously the words “social network” applied as a label mean the exact same thing to all people (sigh).

#3 – If by “customers” you mean those who use Google’s services and products in both their free and paid-for formats, then you’d be hard pressed to find a more end-user orientated company. Case in point any G+ users owns the data they upload (all of it). If you want to, you can download it and close your profile and walk away. Last time I checked Facebook retained the rights to everything you posted even after you closed your profile and it has taken court orders to stop them from using deleted profiles’ data.

#2 – I have no idea how you can think a structured search index is not a library (guess there are no books you can see there). Semantic search is very much like that and Google’s Knowledge Vault goes even beyond it. Search is useless without an index, an index is a cataloguing of information in a highly cross-referenced way. This point, quite frankly is ridiculous.

#1 – I agree with the extrinsinc/intrinsic rewards principle. There are many Google employees who do not use G+ themselves and it has caused issues internally in the company.

You could have got rid of all the other points and led with that and you would have got yourself an article that actually added some real value to the online conversation, but for that to happen you would have to have some awareness of the G+ platform itself (i.e. use it occasionally).
Google needs to rethink its mission statement and delight its customers
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+Judy Gombita​ I think it shows up our multichannel approach to the social web and finding the best/most appropriate platform for engagement with discreet groups of connections - whether here, on Twitter or on Forbes.com. Each carries its own merits.

As for the 'imminent' demise of G+: I'm enjoying the new mobile-friendly view of communities which seems to have been developed and rolled out recently.

+Mark Traphagen at least Steve Denning is responding in a timely fashion to your points (in as much as acknowledging your Tweets). It'll be interesting to see what this deeper look into the engagement stat actually means.

​Apologies for slow response; I didn't get a notification of your last comment.
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Thanks Judy! 
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My guess is we won't have #PRredefined  until the C-suite gender composition more accurately reflects the overall industry (workforce).  A great (well-researched) article by  +Aarti Shah for +Holmes Report .
While women make up about 70% of the PR workforce, they only hold about 30% of the top positions in the industry.
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Did you see +Stephen Waddington 's new crowdsourced post, How can we improve the representation of women in professional life? 

Nine responses compiled so far; mine was too long for the group version (same with +Karen Freberg and +Katy Howell), so look for individual guest blog posts next week....
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Any article that quotes IBM's (awesome) Jon Iwata is bound to be good, I say.
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Education
  • University of Toronto
    Honours Bachelor of Arts, Double Specialist, English and History
  • Ryerson University
    Certificate in Magazine Journalism
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Story
Tagline
Social PR for Business: Relating the Inside Out™ (March 12, 2013)
Introduction
Newest news (May 2013): I've joined the international editorial advisory board for (McMaster University's) Journal of Professional Communication (JPC).

I've been nicknamed the Maven-Connector. Social media (and a social business) are excellent in this regard--information and connections. I also take pride in being an independent thinker and try to avoid "filter bubbles" and "confirmation bias." I wrote my definition of "social public relations" it in March 2013.

Currently I'm doing the majority of my networking and information sourcing via our international, collaborative blog PR Conversations (around since April 2007), Canadian Women in Communications, LinkedIn, Twitter and Google+.

I am also a regular participant in Twitter chats, particularly those with a business focus.

Amongst my many "passions" (or interests) are film, theatre, opera, classical and various modern music. books, fine food and wine. Plus having conversations with people in a multitude of disciplines and from different places from around the globe.

Speaking of which, one of my greatest delights is to travel to places around the world, see the sights/sites, talk to the people and experience their unique culture. But I'm always happy (and ready) to come home to Toronto. A few of its key features highlighted above. (Water skyline view from the ferry dock on Ward's Island; other photos taken at Ontario Place.)
Bragging rights
My Making Honest B2B Endorsements through Social PR, Part II is the all-time most-read article on CommPRObiz! (By far. Or thousands.) http://ow.ly/l9fNj (Earlier) My two-part guest post on CommPRObiz, the Digital PR Cafe, Teasing out the potential of Twitter chats Part I http://bit.ly/pxdQWU and Part II - http://bit.ly/q4PePX
Work
Occupation
(Social) public relations and communication management strategist (solopreneur)
Employment
  • (Social) public relations and communication management strategist (solopreneur)
    Senior-level /hybrid public relations, communication management and social media specialistmmunication management specialist, present
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Currently
Toronto, ON, Canada