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Tracey McClune
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Living life, one quote at a time.
Living life, one quote at a time.

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I'm scared to start a new BuJo. I'm trying to eke out every last inch of this current one. I don't want to carry two books around forever.

I'm done whining. :)

What kind of work does your BuJo help you manage?

I'm a customer support project manager and full-time student.

You?

A post I made on studying new topics and task management. I am not particularly brilliant but have managed to go back to school and work full-time for the past year. The original question asked was how to study topics that would be used in a new job that the poster may have over exaggerated their skill set.

I think the biggest thing is breaking up the largest tasks into smaller ones. If you try to SEE the entire picture, you are going to feel overwhelmed.

If you've gone through interviews already and are at the point where you think you'll be offered a role then you've already succeeded in showing what skills you've got. It's also unlikely you'll be expected to know everything about everything on day one.

You won't use everything in Excel (for example) in your new job so you can shelve some topics right away.

1. What areas are you strongest in?
2. What are areas you are weakest in?
3. What areas do you think will be used in your daily work?


Once you've eliminated your strong areas and identified the areas that you need to focus on, you've already got a much more doable list of tasks.

If it were me, in this case, I'd assemble a list that looks something like this (using ExcelExposure course list as a guide):

- Conditional Formatting
- Auto-Filter / Advanced Filter
- Pivot Tables (1, 2, and 3)
- Data Validation
- Error Checking
- Statistical Functions

At that point, I should have a fairly solid base on which to build the more complex features of Excel like adding in VBA and such.

You don't have to do everything. You need to plump up what you've got and design a plan to expand on your skills. It's the same for financial reporting, the same three questions apply and give you the foundation to break up your tasks.

Here's a real life example for me and what I'm studying right now:

8 chapters to complete
4 weeks to finish
4 days a week used to study
2 chapters per week to complete

For each chapter I do the following 4 tasks:

vocabulary
notes
homework
quizzes.

I only study 4 days a week so that means two days are devoted to each chapter and each day has two tasks:

- vocab & notes on day 1
- homework & quizzes on day 2.

It's not so impossible once you break it up that way. It ceases to be "I have to complete and entire course of accounting in 4 weeeeeeeeks!" and becomes, "I have vocabulary to write down today." or "I have notes to take on a chapter today."

You need to divide your time between your subjects and break them down equally. You can also combine your knowledge because financial reporting and excel go hand in hand. If you find a topic in financial reporting that will utilize excel, learn how to make excel perform that functionality.
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A few thoughts on the BuJo (response from a reddit comment).
I've been waxing poetic about the Bullet Journal for some time. I thought I'd share some posts I've made elsewhere as a bit of a collection.

I was asked how to record the number of times spoken to someone--not something I really do. But the information given was useful (I'm biased, I admit).

Here are two key things to think about when trying to determine whether a BuJo will work for you:

- The first thing you need to think about with any notebook is the context in which you want to use it.

- You also need to think about the tools employed within that context and how they must be utilized in conjunction with your notebook.

For me, I don't need to record the number of times I speak with someone in my notebook because that information isn't necessary for my work. I have some tasks which do require this and that information is recorded in a spreadsheet which is then routinely analyzed and data mined. Those entries in that log, are the result of one of my daily tasks. If I needed to record how many calls I made per day or how often I spoke to someone (as a manager, for example) then those would also be the result of some other task.
Previously, as a manager, I would create a text file on each employee under my group and then everything related to them went there. It was never openly recorded in a notebook.

I do not record every aspect of my work day in my BuJo.
For example, I receive escalations via email, CRM, ticketing system, external sources (like Twitter), phone, and walk-up's. I don't have a task list every day listing each of those sources. If I have an actionable item from one of those sources then it is handled in a variety of ways, because, like many large companies we have a dozen different tools that each team adopted for "their" tools. It's ridiculous. I digress. The actionable items are broken up into tasks and those individual tasks will make it into my BuJo but typically NOT the entire project.

If I'm working on a project, I will brainstorm in the BuJo or break down the project into tasks. The tasks are then pulled out of the brainstorming pages and makes its way into my daily tasks.

I have list of projects that I want to complete in my BuJo and I can then make a note of their status and where it is tracked. For example, we use a ticketing system, so if I create a project and finish it, then I can note the ticket # for reference. But, the BuJo is really a tickler file for all the other resources I need to use to do my job. My team actively works with dozens of other teams to do our work and each team tracks their projects different. We have at least 6 different intake systems used across the company which means I can be recording projects updates and information in 6 different systems at any given time. I utilize bookmarks in my browser VERY heavily and I also put the info in my BuJo.

The #1 shift I had to make to make BuJo work for me and be a success is to recognize it as the "task master" of my life. I break things down into pieces and those pieces become my daily work.
I have some journal pages that I use at the back to vent when I'm feeling particularly stuck on something. It helps me to write it out and that will often help me break through that issue. I also maintain a list of quotes at the back. I like to read them periodically to motivate or inspire me. I also keep a hand-written copy of our corporate leadership principles in the back as a reminder of where my focus needs to be in terms of the company.

I sound like a giant nerd. :)

I've been waxing poetic about the Bullet Journal for some time. I thought I'd share some posts I've made elsewhere as a bit of a collection.

I was asked how to record the number of times spoken to someone--not something I really do. But the information given was useful (I'm biased, I admit).

Here are two key things to think about when trying to determine whether a BuJo will work for you:

- The first thing you need to think about with any notebook is the context in which you want to use it.

- You also need to think about the tools employed within that context and how they must be utilized in conjunction with your notebook.

For me, I don't need to record the number of times I speak with someone in my notebook because that information isn't necessary for my work. I have some tasks which do require this and that information is recorded in a spreadsheet which is then routinely analyzed and data mined. Those entries in that log, are the result of one of my daily tasks. If I needed to record how many calls I made per day or how often I spoke to someone (as a manager, for example) then those would also be the result of some other task.
Previously, as a manager, I would create a text file on each employee under my group and then everything related to them went there. It was never openly recorded in a notebook.

I do not record every aspect of my work day in my BuJo.
For example, I receive escalations via email, CRM, ticketing system, external sources (like Twitter), phone, and walk-up's. I don't have a task list every day listing each of those sources. If I have an actionable item from one of those sources then it is handled in a variety of ways, because, like many large companies we have a dozen different tools that each team adopted for "their" tools. It's ridiculous. I digress. The actionable items are broken up into tasks and those individual tasks will make it into my BuJo but typically NOT the entire project.

If I'm working on a project, I will brainstorm in the BuJo or break down the project into tasks. The tasks are then pulled out of the brainstorming pages and makes its way into my daily tasks.

I have list of projects that I want to complete in my BuJo and I can then make a note of their status and where it is tracked. For example, we use a ticketing system, so if I create a project and finish it, then I can note the ticket # for reference. But, the BuJo is really a tickler file for all the other resources I need to use to do my job. My team actively works with dozens of other teams to do our work and each team tracks their projects different. We have at least 6 different intake systems used across the company which means I can be recording projects updates and information in 6 different systems at any given time. I utilize bookmarks in my browser VERY heavily and I also put the info in my BuJo.

The #1 shift I had to make to make BuJo work for me and be a success is to recognize it as the "task master" of my life. I break things down into pieces and those pieces become my daily work.
I have some journal pages that I use at the back to vent when I'm feeling particularly stuck on something. It helps me to write it out and that will often help me break through that issue. I also maintain a list of quotes at the back. I like to read them periodically to motivate or inspire me. I also keep a hand-written copy of our corporate leadership principles in the back as a reminder of where my focus needs to be in terms of the company.

I sound like a giant nerd. :)
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Not surprised... I function far better with handwritten tasks and information.
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Originally shared by ****
Today on the Huckberry Journal — the shape of things to come, long before The Clash or The Ramones. 
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Love it.
Go to Google Drive > Create > Spreadsheet, and then type P R I D E on the first row (one letter per column), then hit enter. #Easteregg #GooglePride   #GayPride   #LGBT   #Rainbow  
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I found this to be a fairly interesting article. I'm not a fan of FB and am not really surprised that certain audiences are leaving it. I am using FB more now than ever but I'm not really HAPPY about it. I use it because others are using it and the content I do want to read is being presented there.

The shout out to Reddit in the article was hilarious. I have always had a strong aversion of Reddit (not content, but UI) and still do but have worked around it by using third-party tools. The content on Reddit is some of the best on the 'net and I use it more and more each day it seems. 

R believes that teens are leaving FB because it's a crap platform and they are becoming more discerning and not tolerating crap. I think it's a fair point. There isn't one reason why anybody starts/stops doing a particular thing.

Oh yeah, go G+ for the uptick in usage this past year! :)
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Yum.
Announcing Epicurious Crowd Pleasers, our brand-new special newsstand edition. It's packed with party menus and recipes, including that rather famous pizza on the cover >> http://trib.al/m4MdAQ6
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