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Fraser Cain
987,835 followers -
Publisher of Universe Today
Publisher of Universe Today

987,835 followers
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Fraser's posts

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Here's a new timelapse video from +Jack Fusco showing the night sky above streams of lava pouring into the ocean. Epic!

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The Sun still has about 5 billion years to go before it dies, but it doesn't hurt to start thinking about how we can save it.

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This is absolutely heartbreaking, and as more victims step forward, the evidence mounts. Thanks to +Chad Haney for putting together the original post and the backup Twitter evidence.
Master Con
I've been using Twitter for a while but still feel like a n00b on Twitter. Anyway, I stumbled on this Tweet by +Pamela L. Gay. I used to do a lot of science outreach in the early days of G+ via #ScienceSunday. Scott was somewhat involved when ScienceSunday started branching into HOAs. I more or less do my own science outreach now. Based on my interaction with him and the subsequent people that have come forward, I can only say bravo to the victims that have the courage to warn others. The con continues when people are so traumatized that they can't speak up. That's by design. Read this well written piece on Medium. There are excellent links to learn about tactics such as "gas lighting".

Here's just a handful of Tweets that support what the Medium post says.

https://twitter.com/doug_ellison/status/778039996666245120
https://twitter.com/katyannc/status/777929319503040512
https://twitter.com/katyannc/status/777924658788196352
https://twitter.com/DrMRFrancis/status/778009847753220096
https://twitter.com/Cosmic_Ray/status/778114329438715904
https://twitter.com/Cosmic_Ray/status/778114574608429056

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Weekly Space Hangout - January 29, 2016

Hi everyone, we're trying a new experiment this week. We're going to be setting up our Weekly Space Hangout through YouTube Live. I have no idea whether or not this is going to work properly, and what the implications are.

But, we can't learn if we don't try...

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Here’s an amazing photograph of the Milky Way by astrophotographer Matt Dieterich. He took the image a step further, however, and identified all the constellations you can see close to the Milky Way.

Right down near the horizon is Sagittarius – it looks like a teapot, with the Milky Way rising like steam from its spout. Many of the brightest, most spectacular nebulae in the night sky are located around this constellation: the Lagoon Nebula, Trifid Nebula, and the Omega Nebula. The 4 million solar mass supermassive black hole located at the center of the Milky Way is located in this region too.

Further up the Milky Way you can see the three constellations that form the Summer Triangle: Lyra, Cygnus and Aquila.

And right on the left side of the photograph is Cassiopeia, with its familiar “W” shape.

In the lower-right of the image are a few constellations from the zodiac: Scorpio, Libra and Virgo. And if you look closely you can see Saturn making its way across the sky, in the plane of the ecliptic.

If you’re interested in learning about the night sky, I highly recommend you take your time and learn your constellations. These are your wayposts, navigational aides that help you find your way across the Universe, to the wonders right there in the sky above you.

Matt used a Nikon D750 camera with a 24mm f/1.4 lens. The whole image is made up of 20 separate exposures of 15 seconds each, stitched together to make this amazing mosaic. He captured this image from Glacier National Park in Northern Montana.

http://www.universetoday.com/127081/milky-way-with-nearby-constellations-by-matt-dieterich/
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Join Fraser Cain and a rotating crew of space journalists to talk about the biggest news in space and astronomy.

This week we have Stuart Robbins, Research Scientist at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI); Mars Impact Craters, Science Lead on Moon Mappers and Mercury Mappers.

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As you probably know, stars can come in different colors, from the cooler, redder stars, to the hottest blue and white stars.

It's hard to see the difference in color, but you can really see it in a star trail image like this one, taken by Mary Spicer.

Mary used her Canon 1100D with an 18-55 mm lens and wide angle attachment. She took 30 second exposures for 3 hours, collecting all the data to be able to create this star trail images.

To build the final image, she used StarStaX and the cleaned everything up in Adobe Lightroom.

Here's a link to the original image:
https://www.flickr.com/…/spicey_…/24016961709/in/dateposted/
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Join Fraser Cain and a rotating crew of space journalists to talk about the biggest news in space and astronomy.

This week we have Dr. Steve B. Howell, Project Scientist on Kepler, to discuss the great new results coming form the K2 mission - the repurposed Kepler mission.

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Join Fraser Cain and a rotating crew of space journalists to talk about the biggest news in space and astronomy.

This week we have Elizabeth S. Sexton-Kennedy. She works at FermiLab as Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Offline Coordinator. CMS (at CERN/LHC) is a particle detector that is designed to see a wide range of particles and phenomena produced in high-energy proton collisions in the LHC.
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