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Christopher B
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It is much worse almost 3-years later. Google has become one of the worst companies in the world. They used to care about the user-experience and allowed by being different. Now they are blatantly asshole-ish about every single thing when it comes to macOS and iOS.

"I am not sure why Google continues on their trend of breaking things when it comes to OS X and iOS. "
Has anyone else notice that certain apps will open on startup even if you have them disabled from doing so? Notably Drive, Chrome and Steam. I hate to uninstall Chrome but it looks like I will have to do it, I have already removed Drive. I can't delete Steam because I need that. 

This seems to have happened after the last update. 
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A bad week? Phil is in the reality distortion field right now...

I like Phil, and don’t expect him to admit how bad a job Apple is doing in all aspects of the game; but, a “bad week” is a serious understatement.
After a pair of interviews earlier this month, Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller recently sat down with The Telegraph to talk about his on Apple’s latest and greatest products in 2018, that really bad week for software bugs, and more…
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+Matt F KD doing the U.S. like this? 😂
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Great read, and terrific reflection on how bad the “Internet” just 7 years ago really was compared to today.

Everything else in the U.S. is regressing, might as well destroy the internet too.
Can we quit it with the FCC's "rollback to 2015" line?

The idea that today's vote puts us back to the regulatory regime in place in 2015 may be technically correct, but it's deeply misleading, and I've seen enough folks on the pro-net-neutrality side accept this unquestioned that I think the practical effect is getting missed.

The 2015 scheme superseded earlier 2010 regulations that sunset as a result of the 2015 rules. The vote today undid the 2015 rules, but did not bring back the 2010 rules. So it would be much more honest to say that today's vote rolled the US internet regulatory regime back to 2010, not to 2015.

One can make a reasonable argument that the 2015 internet did not look much different from today's, and so regulating the internet in 2017 like it was in 2015 shouldn't make much difference. But it's much harder to say the same about the 2017 internet compared to 2010's.

We see progress incrementally, so it can be hard to remember what the internet looked like in 2010. Let me give you a little refresher.

High-bandwidth services were much less common. Market saturation was much lower. There was still a competitive market for last-mile connections, because telcos had to allow other ISP's to offer service to their customers. Phone-based DSL at speeds topping out around 2 Mbps was competitive with cable and other "broadband" technologies, even in most large cities in the US.

The fraction of users who primarily accessed the internet via mobile device was miniscule, and the proportion of mobile-phone customers with high-speed mobile data packages was around 15%. And on those mobile devices, the day when a large proportion of traffic would be handled by apps not blessed by the telcos, handset manufacturers, and OS providers was still a ways off; several of the phone app stores allowed carriers to whitelist apps they'd allow on their networks; any apps they didn't specifically allow were invisible.

And let's recall that under 2010 rules, AT&T blocked FaceTime. Phone-based hotspots were blocked by almost all the telcos, because they didn't want competition with the dedicated hotspot devices they sold or leased that allowed them to charge for a second phone line.

Phones were still routinely carrier-locked, and could not be unlocked without the carrier's permission, which was frequently withheld. For much of the period 2010–2015, you could not legally unlock a phone you'd purchased as part of a carrier contract.

Running a server, of any type, regardless of your rights to its content, its purpose or its protocol, was with many ISP's a TOS violation that could result in your permanent disconnection. ISP's frequently issued takedown notices directly to customers who used BitTorrent, even when their use was purely for legal file-sharing.

YouTube clips were limited to 15 minutes, and for most users, 360p was the maximum quality they could upload. Most video online was delivered via Shockwave Flash. CDN's (content delivery networks) didn't yet support live video streaming; many didn't support video at all, or did so as part of a parallel but separate network.

Amazon Web Services was still, for the most part, a suite of systems that large, established players went to for "surge" compute cycles and for bulk storage of published documents via S3.

A majority of Twitter users' primary interface for tweeting was still SMS (mobile phone text) messaging.

Internet Explorer was the most popular browser by far—though to be fair, it remained the most-used browser until 2016. But it was followed by Firefox,
then Safari and Opera, and then Chrome. (If you include mobile browsers, Chrome was even further down the list.)

Myspace was still ahead of Facebook in impressions and total user base.

Subversion and Bazaar both were more popular than Git among code-hosting platforms.

Most HTML pages served were not natively Unicode (UTF-8), but were still served in different localized encodings depending on the site's language.

With a very few exceptions, networking gear capable of throttling or prioritizing based on QoS (quality-of-service) demands were impractical for wide deployment because the overhead to implement QoS was so great, it was generally more cost-effective to just run a network without QoS.

Long story short: The internet was a very different place in 2010. There's little reason to believe that the rules that worked then would have similar outcomes applied today.

p.s. Oh, and in 2010, we still capitalized "Internet."
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Capt. Andrew Luck; one of the best Twitters to follow!

https://twitter.com/CaptAndrewLuck/status/941674583983136768
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25 years ago, a classic was born.



https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronic
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The only track on the entire album I like.

If I’m rating the album:🎙🎙(if I could cut 1 in half I would)
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