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Strut The Pup
Reliable and Responsible Pet Care Since 2009
Reliable and Responsible Pet Care Since 2009
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Love the Water? Seattle Beachgoers Beware!
Take your dog with you to the beach, and you could pay $54 - $160 in fines.

The city of Seattle has decided to start aggressively enforcing a long standing, but unenforced law, of not allowing dogs onto sandy salt water beaches. The reason – to protect new seal pups coming ashore.

Seattle Animal Shelter has already begun twice daily patrols on these beaches handing out fines from $54 for a first time “offender” to $160 if your dog was off-leash.

As dog owners, we can view this in various ways.
The simplest - this is the law, so we should set an example and not break it. And if we do, we should be prepared to face the consequences and pay the fines.
The second might be to take a positive view – Seals can be vicious animals (although they look adorable). They have large sharp teach and can be very protective of their young. The last thing any of us want, is for a mama seal to think your dog is a threat to her young, and go after it and injur it, or you. So this law, especially this time of year, can be viewed as one to help protect your and your pets’ safety.

Whichever way you choose to view the law, note – it is in place and is now being enforced.

But don’t feel like your dog will not miss out as alternatives exist.
If you want to let your dog feel the sand beneath its paws, take a dip in the shallows, or better yet, run free on the beach, there are off-leash dog parks where you can do just that – legally an safely. Moreover the off-leash parks are all on lake beaches meaning freshwater, which can be less irritating for your dogs eyes.

In the city of Seattle itself, Warren G. Magnuson Park Off-Leash Area is a great location. Over 8 acres in size, the off leash area offers both dog and owner some great roaming and beach time. We ourselves take dogs there on a daily basis and it is fantastic.

A short drive from Seattle, on Mercer Island, is Luther Burbank Park. The park off leash area is over an acre of fully fenced area at the north end of the park with 3 access points to Lake Washington. Amenities include a separate area for ‘small, shy and recuperating dogs’, and a doggie hose down area.

And if you really want to have fun, roam, and get some splash time, you can’t beat "Doggy Disneyland", as it is locally known - the Marymoor Park off leash area in Redmond. Coming in at over 40 acres – yes, over 40 acres! This park has it all. From multiple water beaches, to rolling lawns, woods, prairies, and more. It is well worth the drive and both you and your pooch will return home tired and happy.

Whatever you decide to do - stay legal, stay safe, and have fun.
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Pet License Checks by the King (County) Team

Hear Yea, Hear Yea: Starting April 1 of the year 2017, King County will start enforcing pet licenses door-to-door.

King County has shared that canvassers will do door-to-door visits with residents to talk about the benefits of pet licensing and of course to ensure that pets are properly licensed.

This activity will take place on the weekends between April and October by Regional Animal Services of King Country in collaboration with local cities. King Country requires that All cats and dogs eight weeks and older be licensed with King County.

While you may think pet licenses are not required and are just some sort of fee, they actually help protect your beloved pet, and help provide important pet care and control services in our area.

For example, if your pet gets lost, the license number on their tag can help the county find you and reunite you. Yes, there are also microchips and other collar tags that can do that, but redundancy is good to have.

Moreover, the fees for the license help support pet shelters and adoption centers’ fund country staff that go out to investigate animal cruelty and neglect, and even prosecute those humans that are responsible for that activity.

So all in all, not only is the pet license a requirement, it is a benefit to us and our pets in general. Better yet, the county has made it really easy to get and renew. Simply go online and get it done. And if that is not how you like to do things, there are plenty of others ways to get it to like mail, phone, etc.

If you happen to not have yet license yet, or need to renew it, click HERE and get it done before the good folks of the county of King come by and say hello…

https://www.strutthepup.com/blog-2/pet-license-checks-by-the-king-county-team/

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This weekend the famous Westminster Dog Show started, and is planned to continue through Tuesday.
From Agility Championships, to Hound, Toy, Non-Sporting and Herding Groups, to Sporting, Working and Terrier Groups, it all culminates in the Best of Show final at Madison Square Garden.

For those who happen to be in NY, tickets are on sale ranging from $32 for an event to $100 for a full day…a single day. While the show isn’t cheap by any means, it is quite the experience to watch as both dogs, and as importantly their owners, compete for pride, glory, and honor. For some, the show is so important that they hire professional handlers to ‘show’ the dog to the judges.

According to the American Kennel Club, males and females compete separately in three classes within their breed: Bred by Exhibitor, American-Bred, and Open. Then, all the dogs that won first place in a class compete again to see who is the best of the winning dogs. The Winners Dog and Winners Bitch then compete with the champions for the BEST OF BREED award. At the end of the Best of Breed Competition, three awards are usually given:
Best of Breed – the dog judged as the best in its breed category.
Best of Winners – the dog judged as the better of the Winners Dog and Winners Bitch.
Best of Opposite Sex – the best dog that is the opposite sex to the Best of Breed winner.

Believe it or not, at Westminster, 202 dog breeds and varieties compete in 7 groups. These are:

Sporting: These are “gun dogs” that were originally bred to assist the hunter such as Pointers and Setters that (if not obvious) point and mark the game; Spaniels that flush the bird; and Retrievers that (you guessed it) recover the game from land or water.

Hound: Hounds are hunting dogs that bring down the game themselves, or hold it at bay until the hunter arrives, or locate the game by tracking it by scent.

Working: These dogs are generally intelligent and powerfully built, performing a variety of tasks, from guarding, drafting, and police, to military and service dogs.

Terrier: comes from the Latin word, terra (ground). These dogs are small enough to “go to ground” to pursue their prey (rats, foxes, and other vermin).

Toy: Toy dogs (as their name implies) were bred to be companions for us people. They are full of life and were often bred to resemble their larger cousins (e.g. the Toy Poodle is the smallest variety of the Poodle).

Herding: These dogs’ purpose is to serve ranchers and farmers by moving livestock from one place to another.

Non-Sporting: this group is basically all the remaining dogs that do not fit any of the other groups.

So how did this whole ‘breed’ thing start you may ask?

According to the University of Manchester (U.K) specialist on the social history of pedigree dog breeding in Victorian Britain, most modern dog breeds can be traced to a gene pool from the 1850s, '60s and '70s.

While people have been keeping dogs for as long as 16,000 years, some experts believe that as society became more urbanized, pets became more popular as one way of staying in touch with the natural world. In 19th England, many believed that if children could be trained to take care of and be kind to their dogs, then they would grow up to be kind, responsible adults. It is in a famous portrait of Queen Victoria and her family by Sir Edwin Landseer that the dogs are shown to be an integral part of the family vs. an animal to be tied outside the house when not being used for their ‘working purpose’.

It was the 1859 publication of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species that inspired scientists to apply his ideas about evolution to their own investigations of how change occurs in dogs over time and as a result, dog breeds were created, separated, and defined.

Today, a lot in known about the various breeds and many attributes (behavioral, personality, looks, etc.) can be identified for each….but as we all know, our own furry (or sometimes less furry) friends, are each unique unto their own, and just like us humans, are truly individual.

Enjoy the show.
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January is Walk Your Dog month....and there is good reason to start off the year on the right foot (and paw).

After spending the last part of the year partying, feasting and enjoying the end of yet another hard earned year, it is time to start the new year fresh and on a good note.

Here in Seattle January is cold and wet, and this year started off colder than usual. It might be tempting to skip the first or last dog walk of the day. DON'T.

Both you and your favorite pooch will enjoy some fresh brisk air, working out those muscles, and burning off some of those calories. According to Pet Obesity Prevention, 57.9% of American pets are overweight or obese. Even an extra two pounds on your cat (or five on dogs) is associated with greater risk for disease. So dog walking has mutliple benefits.

And don’t forget to drink. That fact that it is cold and you may not feel it, doesn’t mean you and your pooch don’t need rehydration.

Furthermore, the dry cold weather we have been having here lately can cause your dog to have itchy skin and/or cracked paw cushions and noses. Our sidewalks are also covered with anti-icing chemicals that could cause some harm too.

To that end, you will want to make sure to clean those paws after a walk outdoors. You should also consider trimming the hair off your dog’s paws, specifically in between and around the pads, assuming it is a longer haired breed. Doing this will help minimize chemicals getting picked up and collected. It also helps lessen the ice built up there, which could be painful.

Brushing your pup will help with the dry skin, removing old hair and distributing the natural oils throughout their coat.

So Trim, Walk, Clean, and Brush on a regular basis and you and your pooch will have enjoyed this start to the new year together.

Happy New Year, Stay Safe and Warm, and Go Walk Your Dog.
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Our Pack Leaders, our employees, have the pleasure of working every day with dogs, cats, parrots, and other animals that are cared for as equal members of the family. But not all animals enjoy this privilege - that of being loved, fed, blanketed, and cared for. Many animals find their way to shelters - and the numbers are growing and the caring organizations need help.

On the opposite side of the spectrum, many organizations use animals to help people, be it search dogs or therapy horses. They too need help to continue providing this crucial services.

So to try and help, even in a small way, Strut The Pup launched this year our “Pack Leaders Give Back” program and this Thanksgiving weekend, our employees took part in it for the first time.

The program enables employees to select one or more animal related charities of their choosing, here in our region, and Strut The Pup will donate funds directly to them. No questions asked. No strings attached.

In addition, the company also matches employee giving in both funds and volunteer time.

For this first year of the program, thanks to our employees, we donated to six different charities in the Seattle area including:

The Seattle Humane Society ​​​​​​​The Seattle Animal Shelter​​​​​​​
Special Bunny​​​​​​​
Pasado's Safe Haven​​​​​​​
King County Search Dogs
Seattle C.O.L.A​​​​​​​

The pets we serve are blessed with fantastic owners who love them, care for them, and provide their every need. What a great privilege it is to be able to give to those animals less fortunate and to those animals that help care for our community.
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A short write up on finding the right dog walker for your favorite furry friend

https://www.strutthepup.com/blog-2/finding-the-right-dog-walker/
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