Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Tann Law Solicitors Ltd
2 followers
2 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Height Requirement for Police is Indirectly Discriminatory against Women


Thanks to Ed McFarlane of Deminos HR for preparing this case summary.

Is the Greek government's regulation imposing the same minimum height requirement to join the police of 170 cm for both men and women unjustifiable indirect discrimination?

Yes, is the long and short of it, held the CJEU in Ypourgos Ethnikis Pedias kai Thriskevmaton v Kalliri. The minimum height requirement had been found to be indirectly discriminatory against women by the Greek court. The CJEU held that it could not be justified simply on the basis of it being either appropriate or necessary for the objective that it purported to achieve, ensuring that police officers had the necessary physical capability for the job. It noted that specific tests of candidates' physical ability could be used instead of a height limit, and, subject to the findings on justification of the Greek court on the facts of the case, held that the regulation was not justified.
Add a comment...

Diplomatic Immunity from Employment Claims


Thanks to Jahad Rahman of Rahman Lowe Solicitors for preparing this case summary.

Does an embassy employee have diplomatic immunity in respect of employment claims from his domestic staff?

No, held the Supreme Court in Reyes v Al-Malki.

Mr and Mrs Al-Malki employed Ms Reyes as a member of domestic staff at their London residence. Mr Al-Malki was a diplomat of the Saudi Arabian embassy in London.

In circumstances very similar to yesterday's case of Benkharbouche v Secretary of State for Foreign & Commonwealth Affairs & Anor, Ms Reyes began employment tribunal proceedings and alleged that Mr and Mrs Al-Malki mistreated her during her employment and that she is a victim of human trafficking. Those allegations have yet to be determined and the issue for the Supreme Court was whether the tribunal has jurisdiction to hear the claims within the exception to the rule of diplomatic immunity, contained in Article 31(1)(c) of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 1961.

The Supreme Court unanimously held that Mr Al-Malki would not be entitled to diplomatic immunity in relation to a claim of human trafficking brought by Ms Reyes because her employment (to carry out domestic tasks) and alleged treatment would not constitute acts performed in the course of the diplomat's official functions.

Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Professional and friendly team
Photo
Add a comment...

Tann Law Solicitors is now offering legal advice to companies and corporate bodies. We give advice on company governance, employment, litigation, contracts, business immigration etc. Please contact Andrew Nyamayaro us n 02477632323, or email andrew@tannlaw.co.uk
Add a comment...

For a free 10 minutes phone consultation call us today on 02477632323
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded