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Jessica Kirkpatrick
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STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
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sir sara stanley's profile photoMartin Pool's profile photoRajini Rao's profile photoJessica Kirkpatrick's profile photo
9 comments
 
+Michael Jennings -- I'm really glad to hear that the Women in Astronomy posts are helpful to you and that you are using them as a conversation started for women in your workplace and professional community.  This is exactly our aim!  If you are ever interested in writing a post about how learning more about these issues has changed your perspectives, I'd love to have you as a guest blogger.  There are a lot of people out there who are just unaware of these issues, but few are willing to actually do something about trying to correct them.  Bravo!

+Donna Buckles -- Thanks for your comments.  There are so many things that people who are in more privileged positions can do to be alias. There are spaces where I hold a privileged position because of my seniority or status, and there are places where I don't.  I've really appreciated when people who have a higher status have defended me, supported me, given me an opportunity to speak/do something, or pointed out when I was being treated unfairly.  I try to do the same when I have the authority to do so (and sometimes even when I don't).

I find that when it comes to feminism, people who are skeptics can find it hard to hear these things from women because it comes across as self-serving and biased.  Some of the most convincing posts on Women in Astronomy have come from men who can speak to why addressing problems like unconscious bias, work-life balance, the gender gap etc. helps everyone and makes for a better work place and community for all.

Cato (for some reason I can't link to you) -- If you want to do some introductory reading about these issues there are lots of posts at http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/ as well as well as http://everydayfeminism.com/

+Rajini Rao -- Thanks for chiming in.  Do you have any studies or reviews I could read about the issue of male/female brains?  I would be interested to write about this on the blog and highlight the research and the misconceptions.
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STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
1
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Jessica Kirkpatrick

Women & Minorities Status  - 
 
STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
1
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STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
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Cristian Rios's profile photoFabio Carpenedo's profile photoChris Ruhs's profile photoJessica Kirkpatrick's profile photo
4 comments
 
It's not segregation, of course:
http://www.gsa.uk.com/why-a-girls-school/
It is the same for boys, so if you see it as segregation, it is segregation of boys and girls. Now: what does this matter with STEM education?
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STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
2
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National Science Foundation Support of Women in Academia Science

Nancy Morrison discusses a talk by Sue Rosser at the American Association for the Advancement of Science in February, 2013: “Policy-Making for Women in Science: From NSF Visiting Professorship for Women to ADVANCE.”

'Rosser’s presentation reminded the audience that the dramatic progress by women in science since the 1970’s is due in part to forward-looking NSF programs. At the same time, she reminded us how many problems remain to be solved. In the question session, I asked whether research has been done on the effects of ADVANCE, similar to her research on the outcomes of POWRE awardees. Her reply was that she is in the process of repeating the interviews of the POWRE awardees after a time lapse of ten to fifteen years. Several studies of ADVANCE by others are in progress; information is available on the Virginia Tech ADVANCE portal.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://nblo.gs/Y3q9O
1
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Have her in circles
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STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
3
Add a comment...
 
STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
1
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STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
1
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Jessica Kirkpatrick

❖ Science [ general ]  - 
 
STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
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Theresa Gray's profile photoGerald Sears's profile photoJessica Kirkpatrick's profile photoDavid Harker's profile photo
6 comments
 
We can continue to examine them while using them.
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Jessica Kirkpatrick

Science Policy & Practice  - 
 
STOP INTERRUPTING ME!

My most recent post on Women in Astronomy about listener bias, conversation dominance, and gender:

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it's called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are 'hogging the floor' even when men are dominating.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/07/stop-interrupting-me-gender.html
69
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throughthe lookingglass's profile photoGopalan Sampath's profile photoPatrick Culliton's profile photoNora Gutierrez's profile photo
10 comments
 
This happens to men too. People steal ur ideas openly or otherwise!
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Jessica Kirkpatrick

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
National Science Foundation Support of Women in Academia Science

Nancy Morrison discusses a talk by Sue Rosser at the American Association for the Advancement of Science in February, 2013: “Policy-Making for Women in Science: From NSF Visiting Professorship for Women to ADVANCE.”

'Rosser’s presentation reminded the audience that the dramatic progress by women in science since the 1970’s is due in part to forward-looking NSF programs. At the same time, she reminded us how many problems remain to be solved. In the question session, I asked whether research has been done on the effects of ADVANCE, similar to her research on the outcomes of POWRE awardees. Her reply was that she is in the process of repeating the interviews of the POWRE awardees after a time lapse of ten to fifteen years. Several studies of ADVANCE by others are in progress; information is available on the Virginia Tech ADVANCE portal.

Read more at Women in Astronomy: http://nblo.gs/Y3q9O
7
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Have her in circles
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Cosmologist turned Data Scientist
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