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Tracy Hall Jr
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retired scientist
retired scientist

172 followers
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Photo sphere of the fire-scarred area west of Little Deer Creek, taken from the first high point on the ridge trail from Deer Creek Dam to Cascade Springs, Saturday, 12 September, 2015. #WheelerFire
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Scientists have found, for the first time, a terrestrial (non-meteoritic) specimen of the beautiful blue, water-bearing mineral ringwoodite, a high-pressure polymorph of olivine (peridot). It was a tiny 40-micrometer inclusion, held under extremely high pressure inside a 3 mm diamond brought up from about 325 miles deep in the earth by an ancient explosive eruption of kimberlite. (Think Mentos dropped in soda). Temperature at that depth is yellow-hot: about 1200 Celsius. The tiny, malformed, dirty diamond ended up in river gravel in Juína, Brazil and was sold for about $10. The ringwoodite held about 1.5% water. This confirms conclusions drawn from seismic tomography of the mantle that a zone of shear-wave slowing is due to water trapped in the rock. So the enormous layer of ringwoodite deep below us may contain up to three times the water that is held in earth's oceans. The oceans and this deep reservoir exchange water by the slow process of crust subduction and volcanic action.
http://goo.gl/He7R6D. See also http://goo.gl/1pyNmZ, http://goo.gl/dHxBQ1.

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Here are two rare geographic features caught in our eyeblink of geological time: Saddles on the North American continental divide that are broad enough for a stream to run along the ridge and then divide into two streams, one going to the Atlantic and the other to the Pacific. A leaf dropping into the stream has a 50/50 chance of ending up in either ocean, and a fish could theoretically swim from one ocean to the other. The one closest to me requires a 15 mile hike into the Tetons of northern Wyoming. The other is just off the trans-Canada highway. Has anyone been to either place?
http://goo.gl/86avaq
http://goo.gl/2BnUD9

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In the northern hemisphere, we don't get to see our two nearest neighbor galaxies, nor do we see a large swath of our own galaxy. This captures all three very beautifully.
Three Galaxies over New Zealand
Image Credit & Copyright: Mike Mackinven
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140611.html

No, radio dishes cannot broadcast galaxies. Although they can detect them, the above image features a photogenic superposition during a dark night in New Zealand about two weeks ago. As pictured above, the central part of our Milky Way Galaxy is seen rising to the east on the image left and arching high overhead. Beneath the Galactic arc and just above the horizon are the two brightest satellite galaxies of our Milky Way, with the Small Magellanic Cloud to the left and the Large Magellanic Cloud on the right. The radio dish is the Warkworth Satellite Station located just north of Auckland.
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Great CG by Skoda. They make great cars. A friend in Austria who owned one told me that when Elder L. Tom Perry of the Quorum of the Twelve was assigned to Europe, he needed a large and comfortable car (he's 6' 4", and general authorities must travel extensively) but was reluctant to set an example of using a luxury brand. He settled on a Skoda, and ever since it's been popular with European Latter-day Saints. (H/T: +Rachel Tracy http://vimeo.com/25073794

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2014_05_13 Peoa, Democrat Alley, Rhoades Valley, Jordanelle, Utah
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