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North Babylon Dental, Dr. Asya Shor, DDS
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WebMD provides a list of “15 Myths And Facts” About Dental Caries.

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After introducing digital radiography a year ago, North Babylon Dental makes another huge step forward toward Digital Dentistry. Please welcome a new addition to our office - CAD/CAM restorative system. Digital intra-oral scaning and in-office crown fabrications!

Better-looking and fitting restorations in a single visit.
Scanned, designed, and fabricated right in front of you!

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Dental Trivia: Fun Teeth Facts For Kids

Kids are fascinated by science and biology, especially the human body. As they learn to practice good oral health and hygiene, you can make it fun by sharing stories and interesting information about teeth and the mouth. There is an abundance of interesting teeth facts for kids that explore their structure, development and importance. Here are some the kids can really sink their teeth into — so to speak.

Dental Fun Facts for Kids

Kids in prehistoric times likely did not suffer with tooth decay. The American Dental Association says this is because sugar was not a part of their diet.
Tooth enamel is the strongest substance in the human body; because it's so durable, healthy tooth enamel protects teeth from cavity-causing oral bacteria.
Teeth contain stem cells. In fact, according to SingularityHUB, some researchers are using dental stem cells to regrow human teeth. If successful, this technology would mean we can biologically replace lost adult teeth for the first time in history.
Unlike bones or other parts of the body, teeth are incapable of self-repair. This is why receiving fillings and other dental work is necessary to protect teeth from further damage.
Tooth decay is actually classified as an infectious disease because it is caused by a particular strain of bacteria passed between multiple people.
Historical Trivia on Oral Hygiene

Even ancient populations understood the importance of oral hygiene. And while their methods and practices were rudimentary compared to those of today, many ancient cultures would go as far as to chew on tree bark or wooden sticks with frayed ends to clean their teeth. The History Channel explains how ancient Egyptians even brushed their teeth using a powdery substance made from pulverized eggshells and oxen hooves. Using these ingredients in powder form, and mixing with water, was slightly abrasive and may have been an effective means of removing remnants left by food.

Here's another lesser-known fact: The modern toothbrush was not developed until the 1700s. A man from England named William Addis attached boars' bristles to a bone handle, creating a toothbrush that was actually mass-produced. Brushes with nylon bristles and ergonomic handles were developed in the 1930s. Eighty years later, these products seem primitive compared to toothbrushes such as the Colgate® Slim Soft™, which features thin bristles for an even deeper clean.

Like most parts of human anatomy, teeth are fascinating. Luckily our modern culture affords us easy access to dental hygiene tools and quality dental care. Now that you're armed with intriguing teeth facts for kids, share a few with your child the next time he brushes. They'll really impress their teachers in class the next day!

from: http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/life-stages/childrens-oral-care/article/sw-281474979303065

Chewing Sugar-Free Gum May Contribute To Oral Health.
A recent study published in PLoS One finds that chewing gum traps bacteria in the oral cavity, the ADA (8/11) reported, adding that additional insight is necessary, however, before determining the benefit of bacteria trapping. Still, additional evidence, such as the systematic review by Mickenautsch et al, suggests that chewing sugar-free gum may reduce dental caries because it stimulates saliva production, and the ADA Council of Scientific Affairs has recognized since 2010 that chewing sugar-free gum may contribute to oral health. The ADA website has a list of sugar-free chewing gums with the ADA Seal of Acceptance that are documented to help reduce cavity risk. An additional ADA resource is the Acceptance Program Guidelines for testing of Sugar Free Chewing Gums to Help Prevent/Reduce Cavities. Although chewing gum does not replace brushing twice a day, flossing daily, and regular dentist visits, “it is another activity that can be built into habits that benefit oral health” the article added.
        In an article for Examiner (8/10), America Now News Examiner Margaret Minnicks stated the study published in PLoS One involved five people who chewed gum for varying lengths of time, finding afterward the gum trapped “up to 100 million bacteria per piece,” which “is about the same amount of bacteria removed from a good flossing.” Still, chewing gum is not a substitute for flossing, according to the ADA. One dentist, who also “says nothing will ever take the place of flossing,” adds that chewing sugarless gum after meals may still be beneficial by removing food particles and stimulating saliva production.
Article from ADA news.

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There are 1,440 minutes in a day, but your child only needs FOUR of them to brush his or her teeth. Teach them healthy habits while they are young!
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