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27 reasons Istanbul residents believe they live in the best city on Earth
by Leeann Murphy June 22, 2015 <IMG src="http://cdn1.matadornetwork.com/blogs/1/2015/06/istanbul-skyline1-940x623.jpg" alt="Istanbul skyline" title=""> Facebook Pinterest Tumblr Photo: Lex Kravetski Talk with people living in Turkey’s biggest ...

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The Color Of Istanbul The Judas Tree

in City Trip, Things To See & Do

For centuries Istanbul has been bathed in purple every spring when the Judas trees bloom, crowning glory of artists and empires. And touring the city is even more enjoy...able when it is sporting its quintessential color. From mid of April to end of May, the season is Judas time in Istanbul.

The Judas tree or ‘Eastern Redbud’ (‘erguvan’ in Turkish) belongs to Istanbul as to no other city in the world. It is at once Byzantine, Ottoman and Turkish, the color of emperors and empires. You will see its purple color in the centuries-old frescoes that adorn the walls of the Hagia Sophia. You will see it again on the historic Istanbul city walls. There is no shortage of historical evidence that the name Istanbul, a capital of culture for more than two millennia, is synonymous with the Judas tree. The city is rumored, for example, to have been founded when the Judas trees were in bloom. Similarly royal purple was the traditional symbol of the Byzantine emperors.

The Judas tree had a special place in Ottoman culture as well. Judas tree festivals, which had their inception in the 15th century Ottoman empire, were known variously as `erguvan’ days or gatherings. What’s more, the Judas tree’s sturdy boughs were also used by the Ottomans to fashion walking canes. Boasting a unique color somewhere between purple, lavender and pink, the blossoms of the Judas tree are also known to have added color and flavor to salads in the traditional Istanbul cuisine of the past.

In short, the Judas tree is the harbinger of spring, the symbol of life and rebirth. A special tree that aids the growth of the flowers around it by enriching the soil and imbuing its environs with beauty in the form of clusters of blossoms that burst from its desiccated, shrub-like branches.

Don’t forget, time is short for savoring the pleasure of spring and the Judas tree. So make haste. Now is the time to rediscover Istanbul and relish this rainbow of color.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-City-Istanbul/662051330490234
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2014-04-16
7 Photos - View album

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The Color Of Istanbul The Judas Tree

in City Trip, Things To See & Do

For centuries Istanbul has been bathed in purple every spring when the Judas trees bloom, crowning glory of artists and empires. And touring the city is even more enjoy...able when it is sporting its quintessential color. From mid of April to end of May, the season is Judas time in Istanbul.

The Judas tree or ‘Eastern Redbud’ (‘erguvan’ in Turkish) belongs to Istanbul as to no other city in the world. It is at once Byzantine, Ottoman and Turkish, the color of emperors and empires. You will see its purple color in the centuries-old frescoes that adorn the walls of the Hagia Sophia. You will see it again on the historic Istanbul city walls. There is no shortage of historical evidence that the name Istanbul, a capital of culture for more than two millennia, is synonymous with the Judas tree. The city is rumored, for example, to have been founded when the Judas trees were in bloom. Similarly royal purple was the traditional symbol of the Byzantine emperors.

The Judas tree had a special place in Ottoman culture as well. Judas tree festivals, which had their inception in the 15th century Ottoman empire, were known variously as `erguvan’ days or gatherings. What’s more, the Judas tree’s sturdy boughs were also used by the Ottomans to fashion walking canes. Boasting a unique color somewhere between purple, lavender and pink, the blossoms of the Judas tree are also known to have added color and flavor to salads in the traditional Istanbul cuisine of the past.

In short, the Judas tree is the harbinger of spring, the symbol of life and rebirth. A special tree that aids the growth of the flowers around it by enriching the soil and imbuing its environs with beauty in the form of clusters of blossoms that burst from its desiccated, shrub-like branches.

Don’t forget, time is short for savoring the pleasure of spring and the Judas tree. So make haste. Now is the time to rediscover Istanbul and relish this rainbow of color.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-City-Istanbul/662051330490234
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2014-04-16
7 Photos - View album

Post has shared content
The Color Of Istanbul The Judas Tree

in City Trip, Things To See & Do

For centuries Istanbul has been bathed in purple every spring when the Judas trees bloom, crowning glory of artists and empires. And touring the city is even more enjoy...able when it is sporting its quintessential color. From mid of April to end of May, the season is Judas time in Istanbul.

The Judas tree or ‘Eastern Redbud’ (‘erguvan’ in Turkish) belongs to Istanbul as to no other city in the world. It is at once Byzantine, Ottoman and Turkish, the color of emperors and empires. You will see its purple color in the centuries-old frescoes that adorn the walls of the Hagia Sophia. You will see it again on the historic Istanbul city walls. There is no shortage of historical evidence that the name Istanbul, a capital of culture for more than two millennia, is synonymous with the Judas tree. The city is rumored, for example, to have been founded when the Judas trees were in bloom. Similarly royal purple was the traditional symbol of the Byzantine emperors.

The Judas tree had a special place in Ottoman culture as well. Judas tree festivals, which had their inception in the 15th century Ottoman empire, were known variously as `erguvan’ days or gatherings. What’s more, the Judas tree’s sturdy boughs were also used by the Ottomans to fashion walking canes. Boasting a unique color somewhere between purple, lavender and pink, the blossoms of the Judas tree are also known to have added color and flavor to salads in the traditional Istanbul cuisine of the past.

In short, the Judas tree is the harbinger of spring, the symbol of life and rebirth. A special tree that aids the growth of the flowers around it by enriching the soil and imbuing its environs with beauty in the form of clusters of blossoms that burst from its desiccated, shrub-like branches.

Don’t forget, time is short for savoring the pleasure of spring and the Judas tree. So make haste. Now is the time to rediscover Istanbul and relish this rainbow of color.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-City-Istanbul/662051330490234
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2014-04-16
7 Photos - View album

Post has shared content
The Color Of Istanbul The Judas Tree

in City Trip, Things To See & Do

For centuries Istanbul has been bathed in purple every spring when the Judas trees bloom, crowning glory of artists and empires. And touring the city is even more enjoy...able when it is sporting its quintessential color. From mid of April to end of May, the season is Judas time in Istanbul.

The Judas tree or ‘Eastern Redbud’ (‘erguvan’ in Turkish) belongs to Istanbul as to no other city in the world. It is at once Byzantine, Ottoman and Turkish, the color of emperors and empires. You will see its purple color in the centuries-old frescoes that adorn the walls of the Hagia Sophia. You will see it again on the historic Istanbul city walls. There is no shortage of historical evidence that the name Istanbul, a capital of culture for more than two millennia, is synonymous with the Judas tree. The city is rumored, for example, to have been founded when the Judas trees were in bloom. Similarly royal purple was the traditional symbol of the Byzantine emperors.

The Judas tree had a special place in Ottoman culture as well. Judas tree festivals, which had their inception in the 15th century Ottoman empire, were known variously as `erguvan’ days or gatherings. What’s more, the Judas tree’s sturdy boughs were also used by the Ottomans to fashion walking canes. Boasting a unique color somewhere between purple, lavender and pink, the blossoms of the Judas tree are also known to have added color and flavor to salads in the traditional Istanbul cuisine of the past.

In short, the Judas tree is the harbinger of spring, the symbol of life and rebirth. A special tree that aids the growth of the flowers around it by enriching the soil and imbuing its environs with beauty in the form of clusters of blossoms that burst from its desiccated, shrub-like branches.

Don’t forget, time is short for savoring the pleasure of spring and the Judas tree. So make haste. Now is the time to rediscover Istanbul and relish this rainbow of color.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-City-Istanbul/662051330490234
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2014-04-16
7 Photos - View album

Post has shared content
The Color Of Istanbul The Judas Tree

in City Trip, Things To See & Do

For centuries Istanbul has been bathed in purple every spring when the Judas trees bloom, crowning glory of artists and empires. And touring the city is even more enjoy...able when it is sporting its quintessential color. From mid of April to end of May, the season is Judas time in Istanbul.

The Judas tree or ‘Eastern Redbud’ (‘erguvan’ in Turkish) belongs to Istanbul as to no other city in the world. It is at once Byzantine, Ottoman and Turkish, the color of emperors and empires. You will see its purple color in the centuries-old frescoes that adorn the walls of the Hagia Sophia. You will see it again on the historic Istanbul city walls. There is no shortage of historical evidence that the name Istanbul, a capital of culture for more than two millennia, is synonymous with the Judas tree. The city is rumored, for example, to have been founded when the Judas trees were in bloom. Similarly royal purple was the traditional symbol of the Byzantine emperors.

The Judas tree had a special place in Ottoman culture as well. Judas tree festivals, which had their inception in the 15th century Ottoman empire, were known variously as `erguvan’ days or gatherings. What’s more, the Judas tree’s sturdy boughs were also used by the Ottomans to fashion walking canes. Boasting a unique color somewhere between purple, lavender and pink, the blossoms of the Judas tree are also known to have added color and flavor to salads in the traditional Istanbul cuisine of the past.

In short, the Judas tree is the harbinger of spring, the symbol of life and rebirth. A special tree that aids the growth of the flowers around it by enriching the soil and imbuing its environs with beauty in the form of clusters of blossoms that burst from its desiccated, shrub-like branches.

Don’t forget, time is short for savoring the pleasure of spring and the Judas tree. So make haste. Now is the time to rediscover Istanbul and relish this rainbow of color.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-City-Istanbul/662051330490234
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2014-04-16
7 Photos - View album

Post has shared content
The Color Of Istanbul The Judas Tree

in City Trip, Things To See & Do

For centuries Istanbul has been bathed in purple every spring when the Judas trees bloom, crowning glory of artists and empires. And touring the city is even more enjoy...able when it is sporting its quintessential color. From mid of April to end of May, the season is Judas time in Istanbul.

The Judas tree or ‘Eastern Redbud’ (‘erguvan’ in Turkish) belongs to Istanbul as to no other city in the world. It is at once Byzantine, Ottoman and Turkish, the color of emperors and empires. You will see its purple color in the centuries-old frescoes that adorn the walls of the Hagia Sophia. You will see it again on the historic Istanbul city walls. There is no shortage of historical evidence that the name Istanbul, a capital of culture for more than two millennia, is synonymous with the Judas tree. The city is rumored, for example, to have been founded when the Judas trees were in bloom. Similarly royal purple was the traditional symbol of the Byzantine emperors.

The Judas tree had a special place in Ottoman culture as well. Judas tree festivals, which had their inception in the 15th century Ottoman empire, were known variously as `erguvan’ days or gatherings. What’s more, the Judas tree’s sturdy boughs were also used by the Ottomans to fashion walking canes. Boasting a unique color somewhere between purple, lavender and pink, the blossoms of the Judas tree are also known to have added color and flavor to salads in the traditional Istanbul cuisine of the past.

In short, the Judas tree is the harbinger of spring, the symbol of life and rebirth. A special tree that aids the growth of the flowers around it by enriching the soil and imbuing its environs with beauty in the form of clusters of blossoms that burst from its desiccated, shrub-like branches.

Don’t forget, time is short for savoring the pleasure of spring and the Judas tree. So make haste. Now is the time to rediscover Istanbul and relish this rainbow of color.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-City-Istanbul/662051330490234
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2014-04-16
7 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
The Color Of Istanbul The Judas Tree

in City Trip, Things To See & Do

For centuries Istanbul has been bathed in purple every spring when the Judas trees bloom, crowning glory of artists and empires. And touring the city is even more enjoy...able when it is sporting its quintessential color. From mid of April to end of May, the season is Judas time in Istanbul.

The Judas tree or ‘Eastern Redbud’ (‘erguvan’ in Turkish) belongs to Istanbul as to no other city in the world. It is at once Byzantine, Ottoman and Turkish, the color of emperors and empires. You will see its purple color in the centuries-old frescoes that adorn the walls of the Hagia Sophia. You will see it again on the historic Istanbul city walls. There is no shortage of historical evidence that the name Istanbul, a capital of culture for more than two millennia, is synonymous with the Judas tree. The city is rumored, for example, to have been founded when the Judas trees were in bloom. Similarly royal purple was the traditional symbol of the Byzantine emperors.

The Judas tree had a special place in Ottoman culture as well. Judas tree festivals, which had their inception in the 15th century Ottoman empire, were known variously as `erguvan’ days or gatherings. What’s more, the Judas tree’s sturdy boughs were also used by the Ottomans to fashion walking canes. Boasting a unique color somewhere between purple, lavender and pink, the blossoms of the Judas tree are also known to have added color and flavor to salads in the traditional Istanbul cuisine of the past.

In short, the Judas tree is the harbinger of spring, the symbol of life and rebirth. A special tree that aids the growth of the flowers around it by enriching the soil and imbuing its environs with beauty in the form of clusters of blossoms that burst from its desiccated, shrub-like branches.

Don’t forget, time is short for savoring the pleasure of spring and the Judas tree. So make haste. Now is the time to rediscover Istanbul and relish this rainbow of color.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-City-Istanbul/662051330490234
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2014-04-16
7 Photos - View album

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