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Francisco Ayala-Delgado
Attends City College of San Francisco
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Francisco Ayala-Delgado

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Dam...I hated and still hard chemistry, but for some odd reason I just read through all if that. Couple that with my interest in physics and you got some nerd, I guess.
 
Superfluidity

A superfluid is a phase of matter capable of flowing endlessly without energy loss. This property of certain isotopes was discovered by Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa, John F. Allen, and Don Misener in 1937. It has been achieved at very low temperatures with at least two isotopes of helium, one isotope of rubidium, and one isotope of lithium.
Only liquids and gasses can be superfluids. For example, helium's freezing point is 1 K (Kelvin) and 25 atmospheres of pressure, the lowest of any element, but the substance begins exhibiting superfluid properties at about 2 K. The phase transition occurs when all the constituent atoms of a sample begin to occupy the same quantum state. This happens when the atoms are placed very close together and cooled down so much that their quantum wave functions begin to overlap and the atoms lose their individual identities, behaving more like a single super-atom than an agglomeration of atoms.
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-superfluid.htm

Introduction to Liquid Helium
http://cryo.gsfc.nasa.gov/introduction/liquid_helium.html

Superfluidity II — the fountain effect
http://www.nature.com/physics/looking-back/superfluid2/index.html

Explanation for the Fountain effect in superfluids
http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=395281
Strange but True: Superfluid Helium Can Climb Walls

Researchers have known for decades that if you cool liquid helium just a few degrees below its boiling point of –452 degrees Fahrenheit (–269 degrees Celsius) it will suddenly be able to do things that other fluids can't, like dribble through molecule-thin cracks, climb up and over the sides of a dish, and remain motionless when its container is spun.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/superfluid-can-climb-walls/

If Spacetime Were a Superfluid, Would It Unify Physics—or Is the Theory All Wet?

If spacetime is like a liquid—a concept some physicists say could help resolve a confounding disagreement between two dominant theories in physics—it must be a very special liquid indeed. A recent study compared astrophysical observations with predictions based on the notion of fluid spacetime, and found the idea only works if spacetime is incredibly smooth and freely flowing—in other words, a superfluid.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/superfluid-spacetime-relativity-quantum-physics/

See more at:
Ben Miller experiments with superfluid helium - Horizon: What is One Degree? - BBC Two
Liquid Helium II the superfluid (part 4 The fountain effect)
Superfluid Fountain
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Haha #stig
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Francisco Ayala-Delgado

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Oh look science bitch! 
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Have him in circles
12 people
maribel albarran's profile photo
Ricardo Ayala's profile photo
Chalchis x's profile photo
jeffry turcios's profile photo
mzurer's profile photo
ricky ayala's profile photo
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  • City College of San Francisco
    AMEP, present
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