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Justbod
Sculptures, carvings & artwork - inspired by a love of the history & nature of these ancient lands – created by bod.
Sculptures, carvings & artwork - inspired by a love of the history & nature of these ancient lands – created by bod.
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Tree of Life

Cast by hand in bronze or aluminium, set in 16 cm² oak - £34.95 + p/p.
Buy now>> https://goo.gl/y42iyQ

A design based on the Tree of Life, World Tree or Sacred Tree: A common motif in many world mythologies and symbolising both the interconnected nature of all life as well as a metaphor for a connection between all forms of creation – the link between heaven and hell or underworld - “As above, so below.”

The Celts venerated trees (Tree of Life – ‘crann bethadh’ pronounced: krawn ba-huh) and their Druids had ritual centres within oak groves.

In Norse (Viking) mythology there is Yggdrasil, which, again, in their cosmology is a type of World Tree, Tree of Life and Sacred Tree, connecting many worlds.

Our ‘Tree’ is available in cold cast bronze or aluminium, set within a custom-made oak frame, or hand burnt on English sycamore from our ‘Pale & Interesting’ range.

Visit us for more unique gifts made by hand: https://www.justbod.co.uk/collections

Thanks for reading ☺
Anne
Justbod Team
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Richard, Duke of York Monument, Manygates, #Wakefield, #Yorkshire

“Richard Plantagenet Duke of York fighting for the cause of the White Rose fell on this spot in the Battle of Wakefield December 30th 1460” (Inscription on monument.)

‘... but when he was in the plain ground between his castle and the town of Wakefield, he was environed on every side, like a fish in a net, or a deer in a buckstall; so that he manfully fighting was within half an hour slain and dead, and his whole army discomfited.’ – (Edward Hall's chronicle, written a few decades after the event)

The Battle of Wakefield took place in Sandal Magna near Wakefield, in West Yorkshire in Northern England, on 30 December 1460. It was a major battle of the Wars of the Roses. The opposing forces were an army led by nobles loyal to the captive King Henry VI of the House of Lancaster, his Queen Margaret of Anjou and their seven year-old son Edward, Prince of Wales on one side, and the army of Richard, Duke of York, the rival claimant to the throne, on the other. The Duke of York was killed and his army was destroyed.

The Yorkists marched out of Sandal Castle down the present-day Manygates Lane towards the Lancastrians located to the north of the castle. It is generally accepted that, as York engaged the Lancastrians to his front, others attacked him from the flank and rear, cutting him off from the castle.
The Yorkist army was surrounded and destroyed.

Text above from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Wakefield

Sandal Castle and the Battle of Wakefield:
http://www.castlesfortsbattles.co.uk/sandal_castle_wakefield_1460.html

Thanks for reading ☺
Anne
Justbod Team
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"An Early Meal: A #Viking Age #Cookbook & Culinary Odyssey" by Daniel Serra and Hanna Tunberg introduces readers to Viking Age food and cuisine from early medieval #Scandinavia. Thoroughly based on archaeological finds, historical cooking methods, and current research, the book is a must-read for those interested in Old Norse culture and #food #history. Within its pages, the authors dispel many of the prevalent myths that persist about Viking Age food and cookery, share reconstructed #recipes, and impart new information drawn from years of experimental research in the field.

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“I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says "Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again.”

- Lewis Carroll
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Gray Mare
"Mari Lwyd" meaning "Grey Mare" is an ancient Welsh tradition celebrating the end of the Christmas season (taking place from Christmas into January). A group of singers would go house to house (including pubs) with the Mari Lywd and try to gain entry by a v...

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Some of the most curious artifacts ever to come out of Stone Age Britain are the #Folkton drums, discovered in a child’s barrow grave in 1899. The use of the elaborately decorated solid chalk cylinders is unknown, but new research is shedding light on them.

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St John The Baptist, Healaugh, Nr Tadcaster, Yorkshire

..One of my favourite church buildings (I think it's that tower!)

The first stone church at Healaugh dates to 649, but the existing Church is Norman.

The doorway is late Norman consisting of three orders of carving, including chevrons, beak-heads and figures which may represent the life of St John The Baptist.

The door has a bullet hole in it, which is believed to have been made when a Roundhead, on his way to the battle at Marston Moor, used the door for target practise!

Thanks for reading ☺
Toni
Justbod Team

Some more beautiful pictures here: https://ecclesiarum.wordpress.com/yorkshire/healaugh-st-john-the-baptist/
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