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Tom Olijhoek
Scientist and open access advocate
Scientist and open access advocate
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This is definitely an eyeopener. The phisics and chemistry of water are very elegantly explained and many unexplained phenomenae follow from the new 4th phase of water. For instance when calculating the force needed to transport water in a tree from root to the top the capillar forces alone cannot explain the transport observed. Likewise the blood circulation in humans cannot be explained by the forces of heart beats. It is these kind of examples that made the book compelling reading


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we need more of this kind of investigations into publishing practices.
Including publishing practices of toll access access publishers
Thanks for this meticulous example

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Recommend watching this video 
Last Thursday, we organised a meeting on open access at the University of Canterbury, where we had Peter Lund, the research resource person of the University of Canterbury, Anton Angelo (Creative Commons), Peter Binfield (PeerJ), and Virginia Barbour (Australian Open Access) spoke. Here is the link to the video. Enjoy!

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From this report: "On one hand, increased power of multinational food and beverage corporations over what ends up on the consumer's plate has led to a higher consumption of unhealthy ultra-processed foods, thereby contributing to obesity and malnutrition in both developed and developing countries.
Between 40 and 50 per cent of the adult population in Belgium and Colombia are overweight, reports the Watch 2014.
On the other hand, agribusiness and financial investors are taking control of natural resources and undermining the rights and food sovereignty of local communities and small-scale food producers. Such practices are promoted and condoned by governments in the name of 'development'."

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The Internet's Own Boy - The Story of Aaron Swartz: http://youtu.be/rNRTb4RXkPo

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From +The Institute of Physics: "The National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS, Japan) and IOP Publishing are delighted to announce that Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM) has adopted the Creative Commons license (CC-BY 3.0) for all articles published in the journal...."

Kudos to NIMS, STAM, and IOP for this useful move.

#oa  #openaccess   #libre

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just bought this book as Kindle version. Truly fantastic reading. The society that Rifkin describes is definitely not science fiction. Open science. open access to knowledge, and open technology like open hardware are already shaping the future of the Collaborative Commons
I hadn't heard about this, but I think it will be worth paying 12 bucks for the Ebook, which I would normally object to.  Pre-ordered.  Anyone up for a book club?

+Jeremy Rifkin is the author of "The Third Industrial Revolution" and has a reputation that speaks for itself.

"In his new book, The Zero Marginal Cost Society, Rifkin uncovers a paradox at the heart of capitalism that has propelled it to greatness but is now slowly taking it to its death—the inherent entrepreneurial dynamism of competitive markets that relentlessly drives productivity up and marginal costs down. (Marginal cost is the cost of producing additional units of a good or service, if fixed costs are not counted.) Now, a formidable new technology infrastructure—the Internet of Things (IoT)—is emerging with the potential of pushing large segments of economic life to near zero marginal cost in the years ahead, making a wide range of goods and services available for nearly free, allowing prosumers to bypass capitalist markets altogether.

 

Billions of sensors are already being attached to natural resources, production lines, logistics networks, recycling flows, and implanted in homes, offices, stores, vehicles, and even human beings, feeding Big Data into an IoT global neural network. The Big Data is being processed by advanced analytics and turned into predictive algorithms to speed efficiency, dramatically increase productivity, and lower the marginal cost of producing and distributing products and services to near zero across the global economy. As a result, observes Rifkin, profits are beginning to dry up, property rights are weakening, and the conventional notion of economic scarcity is giving way to the possibility of abundance as more and more sectors of the economy are drawn into the zero marginal cost web. The wildcard is insuring data security and the protection of personal privacy in an open, transparent, and globally connected world.

 

The plummeting of marginal costs is spawning a hybrid economy—part capitalist market and part Collaborative Commons—with far reaching implications for society. Rifkin describes how hundreds of millions of people are already transferring parts of their economic lives to the global Collaborative Commons. “Prosumers” are making and sharing their own information, entertainment, green energy, and 3D-printed products at near zero marginal cost. They are also sharing cars, homes, clothes and other items via social media sites, rentals, redistribution clubs, and cooperatives at low or near zero marginal cost. Students are enrolling in free massive open online courses (MOOCs) that operate at near zero marginal cost. Social entrepreneurs are even bypassing the banking establishment and using crowdfunding to finance humane businesses as well as creating alternative currencies in the fledgling sharing economy. In this new world, social capital is as important as financial capital, access trumps ownership, sustainability supersedes consumerism, cooperation ousts competition, and “exchange value” in the capitalist marketplace is increasingly replaced by “sharable value” on the Collaborative Commons.

 

Rifkin concludes that capitalism will be with us for the foreseeable future, albeit in an increasingly streamlined role, primarily as an aggregator of network services and solutions, allowing it to flourish as a powerful niche player in the coming era. However, it will no longer reign over the economy by the second half of the 21st Century. We are, Rifkin says, entering a world beyond markets where we are learning how to live together in an increasingly interdependent global Collaborative Commons."
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