Profile

Cover photo
Tyler Breisacher
Works at Google
Attended USC
291 followers|154,569 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos+1'sReviews

Stream

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The perpetrator of yesterday's terrorist strike was captured a few hours ago, and the bodies of the dead have not yet been buried, and already I'm seeing a refrain pop up in news coverage and in people's comments: How do we understand this killer? What made him turn out this way? Was he mentally ill, was he on drugs, was he abused, was he influenced by someone in his life? Were his motivations about politics, religion, personal relationships, psychological? We can't form opinions about why he did this yet; we shouldn't assume that, just because [insert thing here], it was about race.

You might mistake this, at first, for a genuine interest in understanding the motivations that would turn a young man into a terrorist and a mass murderer. But when other kinds of terrorists -- say, Muslims from Afghanistan -- commit atrocities, the very same people who are asking these questions are asking completely different ones: Why are Muslims so violent? What is it in Islam that makes them so prone to hating America, hating Christianity, hating Freedom?

I think that there are two, very important, things going on here. The more basic one is that, when terrorists are from a group you've never met, it's far easier to ascribe their behavior to the whole group; if it's from a group you know, and you know that the average member of that group isn't malicious or bloodthirsty, then people start asking individual questions. 

But the more important one is that the group that this terrorist belonged to was not merely familiar: it's the same group to which most of the people asking the questions belong. Not merely the same broad group -- "Muslims" and "Christians" are groups of over a billion people each, groups far too broad to have any deep commonalities -- but a far narrower group, a group with a common culture. And there's a reason that people don't want to ask "What is it about this group that caused it:" because in this case, there's a real answer.

The picture you see below is of the Confederate flag which the state of South Carolina flies on the grounds of its state house, and has ever since 1962. (That's 1962, not 1862: it was put there in response to the Civil Rights movement, not to the Civil War) Today, all of the state flags in that state are at half mast; only the Confederate flag is flying at full mast.

The state government itself is making explicit its opinion on the matter: while there may be formal mourning for the dead, this is a day when the flag of white supremacy can fly high. When even the government, in its formal and official behavior, condones this, can we really be surprised that terrorists are encouraged? (Terrorists, plural, as this is far from an isolated incident; even setting aside the official and quasi-official acts of governments, the history of terror attacks and even pogroms in this country is utterly terrifying)

Chauncey DeVega asked some excellent questions in his article at Salon (http://goo.gl/3AZWy7); among them,

1. What is radicalizing white men to commit such acts of domestic terrorism and mass shootings? Are Fox News and the right-wing media encouraging violence?

6. When will white leadership step up and stop white right-wing domestic terrorism?

7. Is White American culture pathological? Why is White America so violent?

8. Are there appropriate role models for white men and boys? Could better role models and mentoring help to prevent white men and boys from committing mass shootings and being seduced by right-wing domestic terrorism?

The callout of Fox News in particular is not accidental: they host more hate-filled preachers and advocates of violence, both circuitous and explicit, than Al Jazeera. 

There is a culture which has advocated, permitted, protected, and enshrined terrorists in this country since its founding. Its members and advocates are not apologetic in their actions; they only complain that they might be "called racist," when clearly they aren't, calling someone racist is just a way to shut down their perfectly reasonable conversation and insult them, don't you know?

No: This is bullshit, plain and simple. It is a culture which believes that black and white Americans are not part of the same polity, that they must be kept apart, and that the blacks must be and remain subservient. That robbing or murdering them is permissible, that quiet manipulations of the law to make sure that "the wrong people" don't show up in "our neighborhoods," or take "our money," or otherwise overstep their bounds, are not merely permissible, but the things that we do in order to keep society going. That black faces and bodies are inherently threatening, and so both police and private citizens have good reason to be scared when they see them, so that killing them -- whether they're young men who weren't docile enough at a traffic stop or young children playing in the park -- is at most a tragic, but understandable, mistake.

I have seen this kind of politics before. I watch a terrorist attack on a black church in Charleston, and it gives me the same fear that I get when I see a terrorist attack against a synagogue: the people who come after one group will come after you next.

This rift -- this seeing our country as being built of two distinct polities, with the success of one having nothing to do with the success of the other or of the whole -- is the poison which has been eating at the core of American society for centuries. It is the origin of our most bizarre laws, from weapons laws to drug policies to housing policy, and to all of the things which upon rational examination appear simply perverse. How many of the laws which seem to make no sense make perfect sense if you look at them on the assumption that their real purpose is to enforce racial boundaries? I do not believe that people are stupid: I do not believe that lawmakers pass laws that go against their stated purpose because they can't figure that out. I believe that they pass laws, and that people encourage and demand laws, because consciously or subconsciously, they know what kind of world they will create.

We tend to reserve the word "white supremacy" for only the most extreme organizations, the ones who are far enough out there that even the fiercest "mainstream" advocates of racism can claim no ties to them. But that, ultimately, is bullshit as well. This is what it is, this is the culture which creates, and encourages, and coddles terrorists. And until we have excised this from our country, it will poison us every day.

First and foremost, what we need to do is discuss it. If there's one thing I've seen, it's that discussing race in my posts is the most inflammatory thing I could possibly do: people become upset when I mention it, say I'm "making things about race" or trying to falsely imply that they're racists or something like that. 

When there's something you're afraid to discuss, when there's something that upsets you when it merely comes onto the table: That's the thing you need to talk about. That's the thing that has to come out there, in the open.

We've entered a weird phase in American history where overt statements of racism are forbidden, so instead people go to Byzantine lengths to pretend that that isn't what it is. But that just lets the worm gnaw deeper. Sunshine is what lets us move forward.

And the flag below? So long as people can claim with a straight face that this is "just about heritage," that it isn't somehow a blatant symbol of racism, we know that there is bullshit afloat in our midst.

The flag itself needs to come down; not with ceremony, it simply needs to be taken down, burned, and consigned to the garbage bin.
"The stars and bars promised lynching, police violence against protestors and others. And violence against churches."
312 comments on original post
1

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
 
woo => hoo
 
New preview of ES6 fat arrow functions in Chrome: bind to `this` lexically with ease. Also in Firefox & Edge 
7 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Chrome 44 Beta is out! This release includes ES6 computed property names, Push API improvements, Android app banners and more.

http://blog.chromium.org/2015/06/chrome-44-beta-improvements-to.html
5 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
 
Just announced the new release of Closure Compiler

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/closure-compiler-discuss/QTKcsJ_VaZ8
The newest release of the compiler is now available from dl.google.com and npm! Thanks to Chad for getting the npm package set up. http://dl.google.com/closure-compiler/compiler-latest.zip · https://www.npmjs.com/package/google-closure-compiler. Full release notes are below, ...
1
Add a comment...
In his circles
495 people
Have him in circles
291 people
Deian Vasilev's profile photo
cristian heriberto ochoa cabrera's profile photo
Paige Breisacher's profile photo
Meghan Chaney's profile photo
Leigh Schneider's profile photo
Austin Coleman's profile photo
Justin O'Connor's profile photo
Mario Gonzalez's profile photo
felix anya's profile photo

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
DOJ vs. Google: How Google Fights on Behalf of Its Users

http://lauren.vortex.com/archive/001110.html

One of the oft-repeated Big Lies  -- still bandied about by Google haters today -- is the false claim that Google enthusiastically turns over user data to government agencies. This fallacy perhaps reached its zenith a few years ago, when misleading PowerPoint slides from Edward Snowden's stolen NSA documents cache were touted by various commercial parties (with whom he had entrusted the data), in a misleading, out-of-context manner, designed for maximum clickbait potential. The slides were publicized by these parties with glaring headlines suggesting that Google permitted NSA to freely rummage around through Google data centers, grabbing goodies like a kid set loose in a candy store.

Google immediately and forcefully denied these claims, and for anyone familiar with the internal structure and dialogues inside Google, these allegations were ludicrous on their face. (Full disclosure: While I have consulted to Google in the relatively recent past, I am not currently doing so.) 

Even an attempt to enable such access for NSA or any other outside party would have by necessity involved so many engineers and other Google employees as to make impossible any ability to keep such an effort secret.  And once known, there would have been very public, mass resignations of Googlers -- for such an intrusion would strike directly at the heart of Google philosophy, and the mere suggestion of such a travesty would be utter anathema to Google engineers, policy directors, lawyers, and pretty much everyone else at the firm.

Obviously, Google must obey valid laws, but that doesn't mean they're a pushover -- exactly the opposite.

While some companies have long had a "nod and wink" relationship with law enforcement and other parts of government -- willingly turning over user data at mere requests without even attempting to require warrants or subpoenas, it's widely known that Google has long pushed back -- sometimes though multiple layers of courts and legal processes -- against data requests from government that are not accompanied by valid court orders or that Google views as being overly broad, intrusive, or otherwise inappropriate.

Over the last few days the public has gained an unusually detailed insight into how hard Google will fight to protect its users against government overreaching, even when this involves only a single user's data.

The case reaches back to the beginning of 2011, when the U.S. Department of Justice tried to force Google to turn over more than a year's worth of metadata for a user affiliated with WikiLeaks. While these demands did not include the content of emails, they did include records of this party's email correspondents, and IP addresses he had used to login to his Gmail account. 

Notably, DOJ didn't even seek a search warrant. They wanted Google to turn over the data based on the lesser "reasonable grounds" standard rather than the "probable cause" standard of a search warrant itself. And most ominously, DOJ wanted a gag order to prevent Google from informing this party that any of this was going on, which would make it impossible for him to muster any kind of legal defense.

I'm no fan of WikiLeaks. While they've done some public good, they also behave as mass data dumpers, making public various gigantic troves of usually stolen data, without even taking basic steps to protect innocent persons who through no fault of their own are put at risk via these raw data dumps. WikiLeaks' irresponsible behavior in this regard cannot be justified.

But that lack of responsibility doesn't affect the analysis of the Gmail case under discussion here. That user deserved the same protection from DOJ overreaching as would any other user.

The battle between Google and DOJ waged for several months, generating a relatively enormous pile of associated filings from both sides. Ultimately, Google lost the case and their appeal. 

This was still back in 2011. The gag order continued and outside knowledge of the case was buried by government orders until April of 2015 -- this year! -- when DOJ agreed to unseal some of the court records -- though haphazardly (and in some cases rather hilariously) redacted. These were finally turned over to the targeted Gmail user in mid-May -- triggering his public amazement at the depth and likely expense of Google fighting so voraciously on his behalf.

Why did DOJ play such hardball in this case, particularly involving the gag order? There's evidence in the (now public) documents that the government wanted to avoid negative publicity of the sort they assert occurred with an earlier case involving Twitter, and DOJ was willing to pull out all the stops to prevent Google from even notifying the user of the government's actions.

You don't need to take my word on any of this. If you have some time on your hands, the over 300 pages of related filings are now available for your direct inspection. (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5L6chr0QvNzbTJNMXpiQWllNG8/view?usp=sharing)

So the next time someone tries to make the false claim that Google doesn't fight for its users, you can print out that pile of pages and plop it down right in front of them. Or save the trees and just send them the URL.

Either way, the truth is in the reading. 

Be seeing you.

-- Lauren --
2 comments on original post
1
1
Malte Ubl's profile photo
Add a comment...

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
 
Did you know South Carolina still flew the confederate flag? I did not.
 
Dear +Larry Page,

The Confederate Flag is a painful reminder to many black people that there are those in the South who still very much wish the Confederate Army would have won the Civil War. They defend the actions of the Confederacy. They believe the Confederacy was in the right. If pressed, they'll say that no no, they don't wish slavery would have continued, that they believe in States Rights and Southern History, but they never finish those sentences. They never say that the states of the Confederacy were fighting for their right to continue with slavery in the face of the US Government outlawing the practice. They never say that the Southern history they so romanticize was built on the backs of black slaves. That flag flies every day in South Carolina as a symbol of those values, reminding black people in South Carolina of where their feelings stand in the hearts of their neighbors and leaders. That the pain of slavery and being reminded of it daily takes a back seat to "Southern Pride."

In October 2014, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley stated the following: "I can honestly say I have not had one conversation with a single CEO about the Confederate flag." (via http://www.vox.com/2015/6/18/8803661/charleston-sc-shooting-confederate-flag-statehouse)

Google has a data center in Moncks Corner, South Carolina. Please be the first to CEO to step up and say something. Tell Gov. Haley that the continued presence of the Confederate flag stands in the way of Google's continued presence in South Carolina. This is where you can not just talk about, but BE about diversity. Demonstrate that inclusion, that the feelings and history of black people in this country, in your company, are important to you. Please take this opportunity to lead, not only by word but also by deed.

Thanks,
Erica
Xoogler (2006-2015)
"The stars and bars promised lynching, police violence against protestors and others. And violence against churches."
View original post
1
Ted Vessenes's profile photoenki wa's profile photo
4 comments
enki wa
 
True that. Double true.

SC keeps having to move the various slaver memorial statues up higher and higher, as people (rightly) deface them when they are within easy reach.

It is also insanely racist that half the stuff in the state is named after the aforementioned slavers

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
 
Available in Chrome very soon!
 
Arrow functions remember the execution context in which they were created, so that will help to resolve some event handler related issues.

class Foo {
  constructor() {
    let word = "hello";

    this.handler = (e) => {
      console.debug(e.type); // mouseup
      console.debug(this); // Foo (note: not window)
      console.debug(word); // hello
    };

    window.addEventListener("mouseup", this.handler);
  }
}
1 comment on original post
1
Add a comment...

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
 
With the announcement of Randall Munroe's (author of xkcd) Thing Explainer book, I've seen a few people describing the complicated things they do using simple words, specifically the thousand most common English words. http://splasho.com/upgoer5/ can help you do that. Here's my attempt to explain the thing I work on all day.

People write a lot of words for the computer and sometimes they do it wrong. Not a big deal. They fire up the computer and try it. They check to see if the words they wrote do what they wanted. If the words don't do what they wanted, then they fix it, and then they fire up the computer again. But it can take a while to fire up the computer, and to try all the different typing and pushing to make sure every word is right. So they say, "You know, I would like to have a new thing that can look at the words I wrote, and the new thing will tell me whether I probably did something wrong or not." This uses less time because the new thing doesn't fire up the whole computer, it just looks at the thing you wrote and checks some things. The new thing can also turn your words into smaller words and take out the words that the computer will not need when it runs. This means that less words are sent to the computers of all your friends around the world, so you are happy and your friends are happy. The computer does what you want, and it does it fast.
1
1
Tyler Breisacher's profile photo
Add a comment...

Tyler Breisacher

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
One thing I do like about classes in JavaScript is the freedom we have inside the constructors, e.g. being able to call super() conditionally.

class Matrix extends Float32Array {
    constructor(buffer, offset) {
        if (buffer !== undefined) {
            super(buffer, offset, 9)
            return
        }

        super(9)

        this[0] = 1.0
        this[4] = 1.0
        this[8] = 1.0
      }
}

It makes some things much easier to deal with.
5 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...
The newest release of the compiler is now available from dl.google.com and npm! Thanks to Chad for getting the npm package set up. http://dl.google.com/closure-compiler/compiler-latest.zip · https://www.npmjs.com/package/google-closure-compiler. Full release notes are below, ...
1
Add a comment...
People
In his circles
495 people
Have him in circles
291 people
Deian Vasilev's profile photo
cristian heriberto ochoa cabrera's profile photo
Paige Breisacher's profile photo
Meghan Chaney's profile photo
Leigh Schneider's profile photo
Austin Coleman's profile photo
Justin O'Connor's profile photo
Mario Gonzalez's profile photo
felix anya's profile photo
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
TJ
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • Test Chamber
  • Blek
Work
Occupation
http://xkcd.com/722/
Employment
  • Google
    Developer (Chrome), 2011 - present
  • Fetch Technologies
    Developer, 2010 - 2011
Education
  • USC
    2006 - 2010
  • Mira Costa High School
    2002 - 2006
Tyler Breisacher's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
From Aaron Yonda
twipcomics.wordpress.com

If you play Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon along with the Wizard of Id it totally matches up. Read Aaron's Twitter feed at @aaronyonda O

End Piracy, Not Liberty – Google
www.google.com

Millions of Americans oppose SOPA and PIPA because these bills would censor the Internet and slow economic growth in the U.S.. Two bills bef

A List Apart: Articles: Learning to Love the Boring Bits of CSS
www.alistapart.com

The future of CSS gives us much to be excited about: On the one hand, there's a whole range of new methods that are going to revolutionize t

Data.Array
www.haskell.org

Haskell provides indexable arrays, which may be thought of as functions whose domains are isomorphic to contiguous subsets of the integers.

Discussions - Chromium-dev | Google Groups
groups.google.com

Description: The team uses this list to discuss technical issues and announcements. Posts will include topics such as discussions on how to

adts
code.google.com

Algebraic datatypes for Dart

xkcd: Rubber Sheet
xkcd.com

< Prev · Random; Next >; >|. Permanent link to this comic: http://xkcd.com/1158/ Image URL (for hotlinking/embedding): http://imgs.xkcd.com/

Master of Health Administration, MHA Program - USC Price School of Publi...
www.usc.edu

Master of Health Administration · Students · Student Involvement · Awards and Recognition · MHA Curriculum · Specializations · Prerequisites

position - MDN
developer.mozilla.org

Values. static: Normal behavior. The top , right , bottom , and left properties do not apply. relative: Lay out all elements as though the e

@Google Presents Greg Koch: Stone Brewing Co.
www.youtube.com

Greg Koch is the CEO and Co-Founder of Stone Brewing Co. Since its inception in 1996, Stone Brewing Co. has been the fastest growing brewery

Searching Browser Internals on Chrome | Stephen Searles
stephensearles.com

I recently switched to Chrome in celebration of Tyler joining the Chrome team at Google, and it's been really great. The Omnibox is perh

California judge blocks voter-approved ban on anonymity for sex offenders
arstechnica.com

"Human trafficking" proposal was approved by 81 percent of voters Tuesday.

Brewmasters@Google: Sam Calagione of Dogfish Head
www.youtube.com

Dogfish Head Craft Brewery's Sam Calagione visits Google NY to talk about their new collaborative process surrounding their new brews, Urkon

'Just Illegalize Us Already,' Nation's Assault Weapons Beg
www.theonion.com

WASHINGTON—In the wake of the shooting that left seven dead at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, WI, the nation's assault weapons held a press con

Caltrans - Quickmap
quickmap.dot.ca.gov

Home · Caltrans... We're Here to Get You There · Travel · Highway Conditions · Live Traffic Cameras · Amtrak California · Caltrans QuickMap

How One Missing `var` Ruined our Launch
blog.safeshepherd.com

Well, that was a veritable shitstorm (sorry for the language). Long story short, Safe Shepherd was featured today on TechCrunch (along with

Wifi Analyzer
market.android.com

Turns your android phone into a Wi-Fi analyzer!! Turns your android phone into a Wi-Fi analyzer!! Shows the Wi-Fi channels around you. Helps

What is your favorite physics problem? : Physics
www.reddit.com

My personal favorite is relatively simple: "Given an initial velocity, find x(t) of a slide wire generator in an infinitely long uniform mag

Santino's Panineria
plus.google.com

Santino's Panineria hasn't shared anything on this page with you.

The Return of the King Soundtrack-19-Into the West
www.youtube.com

This is the nineteenth song in the Return of the King Soundtrack. It is called Into the West. It is sung by Annie Lennox.

Public - 2 weeks ago
reviewed 2 weeks ago
Public - 2 weeks ago
reviewed 2 weeks ago
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
BRUNCH
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
13 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Public - 2 weeks ago
reviewed 2 weeks ago
excellent burritos. I recommend the garlic tortilla.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago