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Shamanic Nights Ethical Fashion
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UP-CYCLED COUTURE - Unique bespoke ladies clothing with original silk painting.
UP-CYCLED COUTURE - Unique bespoke ladies clothing with original silk painting.

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Without artistic records from the past, we would not know how industrialization has removed the connection of 'making' from the original processing of raw materials and satisfaction of creating.

Post industrial society often views artisan work as too simple to make a career from. Creative people think differently. These days a hand crafter, especially women with young children, can mix artisan work with other interests, and many creatives make a great effort to work for themselves in this way, when they have no wish to use their energy to support someone else's business endeavour in which they would only be menial low paid employee.

Instead of importing cheap goods from a country with a much lower living costs than the western world, all the women with young children could be meaningfully employed in craft works rather than separating themselves from the children while they go to work in a job!

That is the reason I decided to work for myself in order to stay close to my children.

The work paradigm for women could change if globalization diminished. Countries allowing such trade, have not considered their own population, and how it would deplete the ability of artisans and crafts people.

The fashion industry has exploited this position for a long time; making profits for owners and middle men who do not 'do' any of the making: manufacturing abroad, to provide cheap clothes at home, whilst also exploiting the worker nation's own population in the rush to manufacture as quickly and cheaply as possible.

China has suicide nets around factory buildings.
India's rivers run coloured from industrial die and chemical waste, poisoning local children.

It is natural to satisfy the natural desire to 'dress'; in all cultures, body adornment is one of the most cross-cultural visible representations of humanity.

This desire is best appreciated when the origins of materials and connection with the maker of clothes is known and understood, in a way which gives meaning to the clothes, that appreciates the essence of inspiration behind them.

#Spinning #Crafts #Handmade #Homespun #EthicalFashion #SlowFashion
Artist : Morgan Weistling , American
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Parent birds feed plastic to young. Doomed. There is just too much plastic everywhere. #Plastic PlasticPollution #OceanPlastic

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Colour conscious caterpillar!
Waaw, j'sais pas comment il s'appelle ? On dirait un chef indien 😀 cette chenille.
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White Sneakers & Marine Plastic Debris
“...Spinning the problem into a solution, the threat into a thread”
- Marketing from Parley (in cooperation with Adidas)

Adidas seem up to the task with an ambition “to eliminate virgin plastic from our supply chain” with ”up-cycle marine plastic debris” linked with ‘Parley’ “...to prevent plastic entering our oceans and transform it into high performance sportswear. Spinning the problem into a solution. The threat into a thread”.

However a £200 ($220) price tag is ridiculous, as is the name ‘UltraBOOST Uncaged Parley’! Will people pay more for an ethical product? It will take some time for manufacturers to get their recycling equipment profitable at low product cost.

A I R. (by Parley) is “An extensive research and development program focuses on up-cycling of marine plastic debris, prevention and interception of microplastic, and new models that can disrupt traditional plastic product categories. To end the cycle of plastic pollution for good, Parley and its partners are working on the development of new materials which can replace current plastic.”

AVOID PLASTIC WHEREVER POSSIBLE
INTERCEPT PLASTIC WASTE
REDESIGN THE PLASTIC ECONOMY

#PlasticWaste #OceanPlastic #CircularEconomy #Sneakers #Trainers

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Very good! Brands committing to recycling the 'forever fabric' polyester which never degrades. rPET is the name for the recycled result, which includes plastic bottles.

PET plastic actually patented in 1941, first bottle made in 1973. All these bottles are still here! This is urgent for recycling.

What are PET plastics??
https://www.thoughtco.com/what-are-pet-plastics-820361

#RecycledPlastics #PET #PETrecycling #rPET #RecycledPolyester


http://textileexchange.org/textile-exchange-rpet-challenge/

Textile Exchange rPET Challenge:

"More than 45 renowned textile, apparel and retail companies—including major brands such as adidas, Dibella, Eileen Fisher, Gap Inc., H&M, IKEA, Lindex, MetaWear, Target and Timberland—have committed or are supporting an increase in their use of Recycled Polyester (rPET) by at least 25% by 2020, announced at Textile Exchange’s annual 2017 Textile Sustainability Conference, where more than 500 textile and apparel leaders have come together to discuss the most important sustainability issues facing the industry."

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Simple method to recycle Plastic Bottles
#recycledplastic #PET
Solution to recycling PLASTIC BOTTLES - 'polyethylene terephthalate’ (PET)
Russian inventor develops cheap and easy small scale recycling technology.

Watch PET from plastic bottles being extruded after heating and compressed through a 4mm nozzle injector which sprays it onto a large turning drum, where it coils as a new fibre; green in this case, from green plastic bottles.

“flex is loaded into the hopper of the extruder and then sent through the screw turns to the heated sleeve”
…..where it is homogenized to a full uniform melt and then goes directly to jet”
….."air is supplied from the compressor with a minimum pressure of 2 atmospheres and passes the heating device where it is heated to 300 degrees Celsius.”
“Important not to overhead the ‘melt’ ”
“Aerodynamic flow turns the hot melt into droplets, and then picks up the drops and expands them”
Inventor Explanation video 38min: https://youtu.be/_8sMCl4RNHg

This is suitable for villages anywhere in the world.
A possible mattress filler, or building insulation material (similar to fibre glass). The fibre may be spun in order to use as a textile: fibre thickness is changed by increasing air pressure through the nozzle for a finer fibre.
The nozzle does not clog as in other recycling machinery.
The resultant fibre has fire retardant qualities.

Interviewer said PET’s half life is 1000 years, so the product is VERY DURABLE. (how many plastic bottles will there be by 3017?
Suitable for building materials and mattresses.
We don’t need more clothes out of it as they will be thrown away!

The project is still in experimental stage - 2 years so far - and patented, but they plan to sell machines when developed: the steel nozzle being the crucial component.
Current output is 100kg per hour: they are aiming for 1 tonne pr hour.
Safety issues for machine operators, (goggles in case of hot melt splashes) but a panel could separate behind nozzle. The heating must also give off toxic gasses.

60 years of packing with PET http://petresin.org/news_introtopet.asp

#PETrecycling #Polyester #PolyesterRecycling #RecycledPlastics #PlasticBottles

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Solution to recycling PLASTIC BOTTLES - 'polyethylene terephthalate’ (PET)
Russian inventor develops cheap and easy small scale recycling technology.

Watch PET from plastic bottles being extruded after heating and compressed through a 4mm nozzle injector which sprays it onto a large turning drum, where it coils as a new fibre; green in this case, from green plastic bottles.

“flex is loaded into the hopper of the extruder and then sent through the screw turns to the heated sleeve”
…..where it is homogenized to a full uniform melt and then goes directly to jet”
….."air is supplied from the compressor with a minimum pressure of 2 atmospheres and passes the heating device where it is heated to 300 degrees Celsius.”
“Important not to overhead the ‘melt’ ”
“Aerodynamic flow turns the hot melt into droplets, and then picks up the drops and expands them”
Inventor Explanation video 38min: https://youtu.be/_8sMCl4RNHg

This is suitable for villages anywhere in the world.
A possible mattress filler, or building insulation material (similar to fibre glass). The fibre may be spun in order to use as a textile: fibre thickness is changed by increasing air pressure through the nozzle for a finer fibre.
The nozzle does not clog as in other recycling machinery.
The resultant fibre has fire retardant qualities.

Interviewer said PET’s half life is 1000 years, so the product is VERY DURABLE. (how many plastic bottles will there be by 3017?
Suitable for building materials and mattresses.
We don’t need more clothes out of it as they will be thrown away!

The project is still in experimental stage - 2 years so far - and patented, but they plan to sell machines when developed: the steel nozzle being the crucial component.
Current output is 100kg per hour: they are aiming for 1 tonne pr hour.
Safety issues for machine operators, (goggles in case of hot melt splashes) but a panel could separate behind nozzle. The heating must also give off toxic gasses.

60 years of packing with PET http://petresin.org/news_introtopet.asp

#PETrecycling #Polyester #PolyesterRecycling #RecycledPlastics #PlasticBottles

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UK must take better responsibility for 1.1 million tonnes yearly of clothes recycling, now that UK clothing consumption is rising, yet textiles reuse and recycling markets overseas are dropping.

Consumption

Around 1.7 million tonnes of UK textiles are consumed every year, 1.1 million tonnes of which is clothing
Clothing consumption in the UK is rising.

Collection

The amount of textiles collected for reuse and recycling increased from 2010, reaching a peak at an estimated 650,000 tonnes in 2014. However preliminary data suggests that in 2015 textiles collected fell by around 4%, partly due to a decrease in the price that operators can get for used textiles in the various end-markets.

End markets

The main destination for used UK textiles is overseas. However overseas demand for used UK textiles has started to decrease and prices have been falling since 2013
Recent trends highlight the need for a wide range of sustainable end-markets. These include re-use markets at home and overseas, as well as developing recycling grade markets for textiles that aren’t suitable for re-use, including fibre-to-fibre options.

#recycledfashion #recycle #recycledtextiles #clothingwaste #textilewaste

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UK must take better responsibility for 1.1 million tonnes yearly of clothes recycling, now that UK clothing consumption is rising, yet textiles reuse and recycling markets overseas are dropping.

Consumption

Around 1.7 million tonnes of UK textiles are consumed every year, 1.1 million tonnes of which is clothing
Clothing consumption in the UK is rising.

Collection

The amount of textiles collected for reuse and recycling increased from 2010, reaching a peak at an estimated 650,000 tonnes in 2014. However preliminary data suggests that in 2015 textiles collected fell by around 4%, partly due to a decrease in the price that operators can get for used textiles in the various end-markets.

End markets

The main destination for used UK textiles is overseas. However overseas demand for used UK textiles has started to decrease and prices have been falling since 2013
Recent trends highlight the need for a wide range of sustainable end-markets. These include re-use markets at home and overseas, as well as developing recycling grade markets for textiles that aren’t suitable for re-use, including fibre-to-fibre options.

#recycledfashion #recycle #recycledtextiles #clothingwaste #textilewaste

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VISCOSE manufacture by the Shandong Helon Chemical fibre plant is causing harm through CARBON DISULPHIDE pollution, to both land and people. Other toxic chemicals used in the production of viscose include SODIUM HYDROXIDE (caustic soda), and SULPHURIC ACID.

Garments made with viscose hang very well, bending softly all over - having none of the stiffness of cotton or linen. it is often part of mixed fibre garments to give better pliability.

It looks and feels a bit like polyester, though made from soft woods. We think it is okay because it comes from natural wood products, but we don't think of the chemicals needed to transform it.

Viscose is made from cellulose or wood pulp, often from soft woods like beech, pine and eucalyptus. “Although viscose is made from generally quick growing, regenerative trees,” says Renee Cuoco, manager of the Centre for Sustainable Fashion at the London College of Fashion, “the sustainability of the wood sources varies greatly.”

Viscose production is also chemical-heavy. Central to the process is carbon disulphide, a highly volatile and flammable liquid. The report cites evidence that carbon disulphide exposure is harming both factory workers and people living near viscose plants. The toxin has been linked to coronary heart disease, birth defects, skin conditions and cancer. Historically its use was found to cause severe mental health problems in rubber factory workers exposed to high levels of the toxin.

#EthicalFashion #SustainableFashion #Viscose #Pollution #CarbonDisulphide #China
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