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Richard L
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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
I'm not sure you're framing the issue the way I would - how about instead of a "quantum" adventure site, you design a "living" adventure site, and have it respond organically to PC activities?

You start by stocking your campaign map with challenges of various levels - your wandering beasts of the wilds and patrols from the area's factions, your camps and dungeons and strongholds and so on... and the occasional sealed Tomb of Instant Painful Death for the party to find, plan for, and come back to when they're stronger.

If the party opens of the Tomb of IPD too early then maybe they all die and the next group of PCs to come along is wiser. If the party reaches mid-to-high level and then stumbles across an orcish patrol or outpost, they wipe it out without breaking a sweat.

But... orcs are organized and militaristic, and with devils directing them on a major operation, there's going to be a superstructure hidden behind that outpost or expecting that patrol to come home, and the superstructure will take steps to learn about and counter the threat the PCs present.

So at first, Brimstone Pass really is just staffed with orcs and warlocks. But as the higher-ups get more and more worried, they start sending in the big guns. Ogres are recruited to lead patrols after a few groups of just orcs are annihilated. An evil priest and their entourage are called to move in after the PCs kill some of the warlocks. If the camp is raided, an alarmed upper management sends in an entire legion, complete with engineers to fortify the location and a dragon or some devils to serve as a resident "heavy." Finally, if things get desperate, the evil priest summons the balor (or the balor just gets sick of incompetent underlings and rearranges his schedule to take care of the matter personally), and he and his horde take up residence in the mountain. This allows you to have each location respond to the party's actions incrementally and organically, and saves you the work of e.g. designing multiple site rosters for multiple tiers of potential PC power.

All this is easy to telegraph, especially if the party scouts diligently or you use rumor tables. Columns of hostile humanoid troops are spotted in the wilderness (and perhaps the PCs have an opportunity to strike the reinforcements before they can settle into a defensive position). The dragon is spotted flying in from the deep mountains and begins raiding herds. A paladin shows up in town on the trail of the evil priest and warns the party.

Maybe in mechanical terms, what I'm describing already matches what you're suggesting. I think the mental distinction is important, though. Don't think of it as the DM designing CR-appropriate encounters for the party to ensure a smooth challenge progression (that's one of the conceptual problems that built up around 3E play and metastasized in 4E); think of it as a world where PC actions matter and player choices have consequences as other powers respond to them. Even if the numbers involved are the same, doesn't the latter just feel nicer?

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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
I can see why your mind would be on the subject of police being used to ruin the day of people who are working to beat back chaos and make the world a better place, or at least just trying to mind their own business. But why is it necessary to assume that a "patrol" of humans is necessarily hostile to a party of PCs? Setting aside the matter of reaction rolls, in a monster-haunted wilderness area, you'd think a party of adventurers would be welcome, or at lest derisively tolerated. Most are little threat to a patrol that outnumbers them probably by at least 2 to 1, and they're almost guaranteed to all work together if a dragon flies overhead or a band of ogres pop out of the underbrush.

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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
A nifty and thoroughly put together post, but let me just help you with the attribution: after looking through some Google image search results, I'm under the impression that "fancy rendered pokeballs" is a whole genre, but the one you used in particular was by a "wazzy88" on deviantart: [http://wazzy88.deviantart.com/gallery/]. Some people on deviantart have been known to steal others' work, but this gallery has enough images along the same theme that I'm willing to believe it's legitimately their theme. So now you can source it, and even send a message to ask permission for using the image!  8^)

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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
Kind of sounds like you're setting up a rudimentary system for quest XP.

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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
Hi there! I don't know if I've ever had the honor of your visiting my humble blog, but when I read this I was immediately reminded of my own post from last November at http://landofnu.com/2014/11/06/a-sliding-scale-of-stabbing/ , so it's possible that that's where you read it and forgot? I'd like to think so, at any rate. I do see you've taken what for me was an abstract musing and put concrete numbers on it, though, so good on you - and let me know how it goes if you try it in play!

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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
I wouldn't say "wrong" - if a way of gaming works for you, it's "right" - but all the same I like the sound of 3/10, and will definitely try it if I ever start using minis in my games.

It seems like you'd get about the same effect, now that I think of it, by simply switching to the metric system. "3 1/3 feet" feels pretty clunky, but meters (or yards, if you're feeling Imperial) are tidy.

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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
Are we specifying that it has to be Greek mythology? Because if you're willing to range further afield, I'm sure there's something Nordic, Celtic, Slavic, African etc. that will match the gestalt more or less.

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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
This is straight-up a good and helpful review. Thorough, specific, rational, doesn't get bogged down in ad hominem attacks against the writers over the negative aspects, and includes examples from play. I'm not shopping for any new game systems right now, but I'll have to keep this in mind if I ever decide to review something.  8^)  Thanks!

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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
On the one hand, I always make sure that the obvious potential TPKs in a dungeon or wilderness setting are well-telegraphed, so that players can avoid them, or approach when they feel they're well-prepared. On the other, if the PCs are picking fights with random strangers, then it's on their own heads if one of the strangers just happens to be able to wipe the floor with them.

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Richard L commented on a post on Blogger.
I've never had the murderhobo problem with my players, to be honest, but it seems like you've barely tapped the vein of in-world repercussions. If players are going around murdering enough innocents to switch their alignment, then they're likely making people angry too. Perhaps angry enough to trigger paladin raids on their base, or a price on their heads set by some lord trying to keep public order. All sorts of adventures you can get out of a bounty on the party.
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