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Mass Clean Energy Center- Dirty State Quasi-Public Agency Falmouth Wind Turbines Ties Up Culture of Corruption In Massachusetts
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Taxpayers need accountability: The wind turbine business on land and sea is a bunco scheme.
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Massachusetts Officials Stall- Avoid-Obfuscate Wind Turbine Noise Test Results- Making A Mockery Of State Health Laws
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The practice is a violation of town policy prohibiting municipal employees. Tax Questions- Falmouth Massachusetts- Who Benefits ?
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Falmouth Selectman Doug Jones Guilty Beach Pass Gifting 

Massachusetts 
By Sean F. Driscoll 
sdriscoll@capecodonline.com

Posted Jul. 27, 2015 at 6:51 PM
Updated Jul 27, 2015 at 7:47 PM 

FALMOUTH
Anonymous tip ends free pass to Falmouth beaches

Town manager says courtesy cards for parking violate town policy

FALMOUTH — As many as 100 people and organizations a year, including a summer science school run by a selectman, have been getting free parking passes at Falmouth town beaches for decades.
But the free ride is coming to an end after Town Manager Julian Suso got an anonymous letter about the practice.

Suso discovered a “significant amount” of Beach Committee “courtesy cards” have been issued each year, allowing free parking at Falmouth’s four beaches, according to a statement released by his office on Monday. An annual sticker for a resident costs $30 and $200 for a nonresident, and a daily pass costs between $10 and $20 depending on the beach.

The practice is a violation of town policy prohibiting municipal employees from using their official position to give an unwarranted privilege of “substantial value” to themselves or others, Suso wrote in the statement.

“Parking at Town of Falmouth beaches is a valuable privilege and such free parking may be an unwarranted privilege,” Suso wrote.


Selectman Doug Jones, chairman of the board, has been receiving the passes on behalf of the Children’s School of Science for about six or seven years. He volunteers as the administrative coordinator at the Woods Hole-based nonprofit that runs summer science classes, which include field trips to Wood Neck Beach. Jones said the parking passes would be used there for about an hour at a time.

Jones said a volunteer used to contact the beach superintendent for the pass each year. But when that person left, Jones said he took over the duty and asked Beach Superintendent Donald Hoffer for the pass, even after being elected a selectman in 2012.

He did not use the courtesy card for personal use, Jones said.


“I’ve been at this school 27 years and this was in place when I came,” Jones said about the free parking passes. “Whether or not I should have investigated them when I was elected, it would have taken a lot of steps to investigate each little thing. But as soon as I knew, we turned the passes in to Don Hoffer and we’ve been doing our best to still offer those field trips.” 

Suso’s investigation of the practice was sparked by a July 6 letter in which an individual recounted overhearing a conversation at a Main Street restaurant in which people bragged that they had received a “blank pass” to the Falmouth beaches. They said they could use the pass at any time and at any beach without paying and did not live in town, according to the letter.

“This policy is very troubling and unfair,” the letter writer stated.

But Hoffer said he thought it was an approved town policy. When he was hired 15 years ago, Hoffer said he understood that handing out the courtesy cards was an accepted practice that dated back to the 1980s, although he said he was not following a written policy each year about the criteria for getting a free pass. 

“Whether they deserved them or not, I don’t know, but what it amounted to was you’d get groups asking as a habit, if you will,” he said. “They’d come back year after year after year. There was precedent.” 

Hoffer said he has 100 of the courtesy cards printed each year and that he typically does not give them all out. Unlike a traditional beach pass that is affixed to a car’s windshield, these laminated passes could, in theory, be passed around to any individual wishing to park for free. 

According to a copy of a pass provided by Suso, it notes that additional information may be requested by an attendant before a vehicle enters the lot. The passes are not valid at the Old Silver Beach reserve lot, a portion of the beach that serves residents only. 

Hoffer said community groups were the main recipients, including Joint Base Cape Cod, Fairwinds Clubhouse and Community Connections. But some individuals got the courtesy cards, including former Beach Committee members. 

“I didn’t willy-nilly hand them out. They weren’t up for grabs,” Hoffer said. “Once upon a time, it was done more freely, but I’ve been trying to curtail them.” 

Suso said he’s told Hoffer and Beach Committee Superintendent Jason Chorches to end the practice and track down any courtesy cards that have been issued this year. 

“We’ll get them back as soon as possible,” Hoffer said. 

Beach Committee member Dan Shearer said he didn’t know about the free passes, which would be an “absolute no-no” in his view. Even committee members don’t get a free parking sticker and the Beach Department rigorously inspects applications for parking passes. 

“They’re really serious and a pain in the ass about it, which is good,” he said. 

According to the most recent town report, 12,619 resident beach stickers were issued in the 2014 fiscal year, which ended June 30, 2014. Nonresident beach stickers and hotel/motel coupon sales totaled 2,359. The department’s total revenue was just over $900,000, including concession sales and swim lessons. 

Jones said he didn’t think the Board of Selectmen will look at the issue this summer but may address it over the winter.

“If this is a policy we think is good, we ought to put our stamp on it,” he said. “If not, then we should say no. We want to make sure no one’s taking advantage of it.” 

Credit — Follow Sean F. Driscoll on Twitter:@seanfdriscoll.

Source :http://www.capecodtimes.com/article/20150727/NEWS/150729420/0/SEARCH
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Falmouth Wind Turbines Ties Up Culture of Corruption In Massachusetts
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Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Criminal Actions Continue

New Bedfrod Marine Commerce Terminal Investigation Needed 

Falmouth Wind Turbines 

Massachusetts 

It's time to look into the financial fiasco at the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal. The terminal started out at 35 million.

Now 113 million going into phase two moving a radio station extending the rail link and purchasing heavy cranes-

To top it off the hurricane gates only have a legal clearance of 120 feet in which wind turbine "jack up"barges don't fit.

The port can't be used for the intended use it was built.

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center built the port with taxpayers funds and several types of bonds.

The port can't be leased for more than the $187,500.00 in taxpayer owed bonds for thirty years.

Taxpayers need  accountability.

Massachusetts commercial wind installations mirrors the subprime mortgage scams that wreaked havoc with the American economy.

The two are enabled by wishful thinking and bogus projections with no accounting restraints, accountability, or transparency; no meaningful legislative oversight and regulatory agencies that continue looking the other way, allowing a few to make a great deal of money at everyone else's health and  expense while providing no meaningful service.

The wind turbine business on land and sea is a bunco scheme.

The Falmouth wind turbine deal dubbed a 'colossal failure'  is taking the health of property rights of its own citizens and now the taxpayers .
The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center has wasted hundreds of millions building an ocean wind port that wind turbine barges don't fit, placed wind turbines taking health of our citizens, borrowed hundreds of millions and now we have a renewable energy center financing litigation cases all over Massachusetts

The MassCEC gave the Town of Falmouth 1.8 million to finance litigation costs against the residential home owners whose health and property rights they took ! 

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center was the original owner of the Falmouth Wind 1 turbine that is taking the health and property rights of the Falmouth wind turbine victims.

In criminal law, misappropriation is the intentional, illegal use of the property or funds of another person for one's own use or other unauthorized purpose, particularly by public officials.

Where is the Massachusetts Attorney General & inspector General ? 

The Agenda has failed these people need to be brought to justice !
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MassCEC & MassDEP Obfuscation Of Kingston Turbine Noise Report 

Massachusetts Officials Stall- Avoid-Obfuscate Wind Turbine Noise Test Results

The MassCEC & MassDEP are  hiding documents and blocking witness testimony  from the public. 

Wind turbine noise studies ,hearings, testimonials, and documents have been provided. 

Government officials continue to ignore facts and insist on secrecy whenever it  becomes negative information about commercial wind turbines in Massachusetts . 

The MassCEC, MassDEP and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health are making a mockery of state noise laws while citizens are losing their health and property rights.
 
Massachusetts is witness to multiple  residential communities targeted with the poor installation of commercial wind turbines. Public officials are themselves hiding their own  accountability for the actions. Now we see officials  stall, obfuscate, lie and then stall again town after town. 

WHERE IS THE FINAL KINGSTON NOISE REPORT ? 

http://docs.wind-watch.org/Kingston-noise-MassDEP-interim-report-2014.pdf

https://www.wind-watch.org/news/2015/06/26/independence-wind-turbine-kingston-wind-independence-llc-reacts-to-results/

iled:   June 26, 2015 •  Massachusetts
Independence wind turbine: Kingston Wind Independence LLC reacts to results  
Credit:   By Kathryn Gallerani | The Kingston Reporter | Jun. 26, 2015 | kingston.wickedlocal.com ~~

KINGSTON – It’s looking more likely that the Board of Health will have a vote in July or August on placing further restrictions on operations of the Independence wind turbine.

The board may vote to amend an abatement order approved last fall restricting the hours of operation under certain wind conditions when the turbine is deemed to be out of compliance with state noise regulations, or it could enact a new one.

Board of Health Chairman Bill Watson said the order could be amended by lowering the threshold that needs to be met for the turbine to be shut down or by extending the hours when it must be shut down.

The turbine’s owner, Kingston Wind Independence LLC, believes either could be the case, at least according to a June 10 letter to the Kingston Board of Selectmen from KWI co-owner Bradford Cleaves. The town leases the land for the turbine to KWI and they have a power purchase agreement.

In his letter, Cleaves writes that new findings indicate that nightly shutdowns of the turbine will likely be more extensive and more frequent, addressing the “ongoing regulatory actions taken by the Board of Health regarding hours of operation and noise/nuisance complaints.”.

“The new findings also suggest the addition of a more complicated set of shut-down parameters,” he wrote. “Because the turbine was not designed for this kind of operational scenario, this would likely necessitate a fixed, daily ‘blanket’ shutdown between certain hours.”
Selectmen did not grant his request for a meeting prior to the June 18 Board of Health meeting when the results of the final sound study report were presented publicly for the first time. He requested the meeting to review KWI’s contract with the town.

Cleaves wrote in his letter about the possible implications of further restrictions on turbine operations.

“If we are going to go this route the energy generation potential for the turbine will be drastically further reduced. It will be impossible to meet our contractual requirements for production to the Town of Kingston and to the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC). This will have pejorative implications for our contract with the town and our lease of the landfill site. We will have to renegotiate the contract, declare the site condemned, or pursue some other measures that will involve remuneration and/or a significant change of terms.”

The public presentation to the Board of Health and interested parties last week included a report from consultants Harris Miller Miller and Hanson about additional violations of the state noise regulation and policy that was released back in April.

The state Department of Environmental Protection was challenged by Duxbury resident Joanne Levesque to explain why, if state noise regulations and policy have been violated, the state isn’t taking action against the turbine owner.

Assistant Commissioner Douglas Fine said it is DEP’s practice to defer to local boards of health in nuisance and noise cases like this, while offering the town all the assistance it needs, but Levesque claims that is not the case. She said the state has taken enforcement action in the past when there were violations on the state’s air pollution regulation.

According to Levesque, Fine was interviewed by a documentary filmmaker after the meeting and admitted that MassDEP has enforced air pollution regulations in other situations.

“The state is in fact putting the town of Kingston in the crosshairs of a lawsuit, when it is the state (MassDEP) that should be the enforcer and therefore the agency sued by developers,” she said. “This is my opinion, of course, but it supports the open question as to why the DEP refuses to enforce their own regulation. They’d prefer the town deal with the legal repercussions.”

Town counsel Jay Talerman said the Board of Health works under a nuisance standard, and that after confirming his conclusion with the state, the exceedences of the state’s 10-decibel limit qualify as a nuisance. Talerman drafted the abatement order and stressed the need for the board to have thorough documentation in the administrative record in case the courts get involved.

Talerman told Levesque that he’s comfortable with the state’s explanation regarding the Board of Health’s jurisdiction.

What is different this time around is that the HMMH report includes predicted data as well as monitored data to determine exceedances as evidence of non-compliance. Fine said past practice is for the DEP to rely on actual monitored data, which gives the state a high level of confidence in the data.

Fine said DEP supported HMMH using extrapolated data in its report as useful information to guide the Board of Health’s actions, but that this is new territory in regard to its confidence in predicted data.
“We will have to work closely with the town to determine what will be the best course of action given the differences between the actual monitored data and the extrapolated data and the predicted exceedances,” he said.

Board of Health member David Kennedy, who had believed he would be able to vote on turbine matters based on previous discussions with the state Ethics Commission, wasn’t able to discuss the sound study as a board member. Unless there is a change, he won’t be able to vote on turbine matters after hearing recently from the state that they needed more information from him first. Kennedy believes a complaint was filed with the state, leading to the reversal, but said he can’t prove it.

Kennedy lives on Copper Beech Drive, one of the roads affected by turbine noise. After recusing himself from the discussion, he was successful in pushing for HMMH to agree to release previously unreleased data from Dec. 13 or Jan. 21, when sound was measured.
Representatives from the consultant and Massachusetts Clean Energy Center argued that the data was contaminated and unreliable, but finally agreed to share the raw data. Kennedy cited the need for transparency when making his request.

Levesque also challenged HMMH and Fine to explain the withholding of the raw data HMMH collected despite repeated Freedom of Information Act requests.

She said Fine may have been technically right during the Board of Health meeting that it was not in possession of the data, but DEP was aware that data was collected that potentially indicated that HMMH got close to worst-case noise conditions during testing in the Schofield and Leland roads neighborhoods. Without that data, she said, there cannot be an independent peer review of that data.
The final report on the sound study won’t be released until after a group called the Consensus Building Institute has prepared a written summary based on comments received through Tuesday, June 30. The date of that meeting will be determined by the release of the final final report.

Written comments about the report can be submitted to Griffin Smith at gsmith@cbuilding.org. MassCEC will make the summary available on its website at www.masscec.com. The study will then be updated and re-issued.

Source:  By Kathryn Gallerani | The Kingston Reporter | Jun. 26, 2015 
http://kingston.wickedlocal.com/article/20150626/NEWS/150627146
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Did "Friends of Falmouth Wind" Qualified For Free Beach Passes ? "Hoffer said community groups were the main recipients"
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Falmouth Selectman Doug Jones $140,000.00 Beach Permits 


Did Friends of Falmouth Wind Qualified For Free Beach Passes ?

Here is the story that appeared in the Cape Cod Times 

By Sean F. Driscoll 
sdriscoll@capecodonline.com

Posted Jul. 27, 2015 at 6:51 PM
Updated Jul 27, 2015 at 7:47 PM 

FALMOUTH
Anonymous tip ends free pass to Falmouth beaches

Town manager says courtesy cards for parking violate town policy

FALMOUTH — As many as 100 people and organizations a year, including a summer science school run by a selectman, have been getting free parking passes at Falmouth town beaches for decades.
But the free ride is coming to an end after Town Manager Julian Suso got an anonymous letter about the practice.

Suso discovered a “significant amount” of Beach Committee “courtesy cards” have been issued each year, allowing free parking at Falmouth’s four beaches, according to a statement released by his office on Monday. An annual sticker for a resident costs $30 and $200 for a nonresident, and a daily pass costs between $10 and $20 depending on the beach.

The practice is a violation of town policy prohibiting municipal employees from using their official position to give an unwarranted privilege of “substantial value” to themselves or others, Suso wrote in the statement.

“Parking at Town of Falmouth beaches is a valuable privilege and such free parking may be an unwarranted privilege,” Suso wrote.


Selectman Doug Jones, chairman of the board, has been receiving the passes on behalf of the Children’s School of Science for about six or seven years. He volunteers as the administrative coordinator at the Woods Hole-based nonprofit that runs summer science classes, which include field trips to Wood Neck Beach. Jones said the parking passes would be used there for about an hour at a time.

Jones said a volunteer used to contact the beach superintendent for the pass each year. But when that person left, Jones said he took over the duty and asked Beach Superintendent Donald Hoffer for the pass, even after being elected a selectman in 2012.

He did not use the courtesy card for personal use, Jones said.


“I’ve been at this school 27 years and this was in place when I came,” Jones said about the free parking passes. “Whether or not I should have investigated them when I was elected, it would have taken a lot of steps to investigate each little thing. But as soon as I knew, we turned the passes in to Don Hoffer and we’ve been doing our best to still offer those field trips.” 

Suso’s investigation of the practice was sparked by a July 6 letter in which an individual recounted overhearing a conversation at a Main Street restaurant in which people bragged that they had received a “blank pass” to the Falmouth beaches. They said they could use the pass at any time and at any beach without paying and did not live in town, according to the letter.

“This policy is very troubling and unfair,” the letter writer stated.

But Hoffer said he thought it was an approved town policy. When he was hired 15 years ago, Hoffer said he understood that handing out the courtesy cards was an accepted practice that dated back to the 1980s, although he said he was not following a written policy each year about the criteria for getting a free pass. 

“Whether they deserved them or not, I don’t know, but what it amounted to was you’d get groups asking as a habit, if you will,” he said. “They’d come back year after year after year. There was precedent.” 

Hoffer said he has 100 of the courtesy cards printed each year and that he typically does not give them all out. Unlike a traditional beach pass that is affixed to a car’s windshield, these laminated passes could, in theory, be passed around to any individual wishing to park for free. 

According to a copy of a pass provided by Suso, it notes that additional information may be requested by an attendant before a vehicle enters the lot. The passes are not valid at the Old Silver Beach reserve lot, a portion of the beach that serves residents only. 

Hoffer said community groups were the main recipients, including Joint Base Cape Cod, Fairwinds Clubhouse and Community Connections. But some individuals got the courtesy cards, including former Beach Committee members. 

“I didn’t willy-nilly hand them out. They weren’t up for grabs,” Hoffer said. “Once upon a time, it was done more freely, but I’ve been trying to curtail them.” 

Suso said he’s told Hoffer and Beach Committee Superintendent Jason Chorches to end the practice and track down any courtesy cards that have been issued this year. 

“We’ll get them back as soon as possible,” Hoffer said. 

Beach Committee member Dan Shearer said he didn’t know about the free passes, which would be an “absolute no-no” in his view. Even committee members don’t get a free parking sticker and the Beach Department rigorously inspects applications for parking passes. 

“They’re really serious and a pain in the ass about it, which is good,” he said. 

According to the most recent town report, 12,619 resident beach stickers were issued in the 2014 fiscal year, which ended June 30, 2014. Nonresident beach stickers and hotel/motel coupon sales totaled 2,359. The department’s total revenue was just over $900,000, including concession sales and swim lessons. 

Jones said he didn’t think the Board of Selectmen will look at the issue this summer but may address it over the winter.

“If this is a policy we think is good, we ought to put our stamp on it,” he said. “If not, then we should say no. We want to make sure no one’s taking advantage of it.” 

Credit — Follow Sean F. Driscoll on Twitter:@seanfdriscoll.

Source :http://www.capecodtimes.com/article/20150727/NEWS/150729420/0/SEARCH
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New Bedford Ocean Wind Turbine Port Headed To 200 Million Is the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal ocean wind turbine port headed to 200 million ? If it is the public is never going to find out that's for sure. How many hundreds of millions is it going to cost ? The final cost of the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal is lost from public view for some reason. The New Bedford ocean wind turbine port was announced in 2010 by Governor Patrick at around 35 million. Today 6 months prior to the completion of the local terminal rumor has it that the project is already way over budget because of cost overruns. The project is nearing 100 million today with December being the completion date. The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Senior Director of Offshore Wind has commented on the project but has never disclosed where the finances are on the project today. The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center is in charge of the project. Governor Patrick appears to be pushing for completion of the project by the end of the year at any cost. At any cost to who ? Where is all the extra money coming from to complete this project by the end of the year ? Why all the extra money to get the project done by December if Quonset Point ,Rhode Island is the construction port for Cape Wind ? The local spokesman for the New Bedford Wind Energy Center said that their is nothing being built like the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal to compete with the New Bedford Port. He is correct but Quonset Point, Rhode Island has already been built and is complete with crane service. Quonset Point, RI is the permitted construction base for Cape Wind. Richard J. Sullivan Jr., secretary of energy and environmental affairs told a house bonding committee that Cape Wind was going to do all the construction from the 200 million dollar wind turbine port In addition to New Bedford a wind turbine blade testing facility in Charlestown was built at a cost of around 40 million dollars two years ago. The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center also built the Charlestown facility.The wind turbine blade testing facility has only tested one large blade and the manufacturers name was not disclosed. The terminal has been idle. Cape Wind signed a lease with Quonset Point, Rhode Island. - Massachusetts Clean Energy Center CEO Alicia Barton said the port will transport fruit, sand and heavy industrial boilers rather than wind turbines . Massachusetts officials need to be brought up on RICO, Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations charges.
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