Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Maria Rosario Di Mónaco
175 followers
175 followers
About
Maria Rosario's posts

Post has attachment
This year's cross-cultural projects.

Post has attachment
Updating our Cross-cultural Projects blog. A year overdue, at that :)

Post has attachment

I find Zielinski's analogy and the reactions I've been reading here most interesting, and they are giving me so much food for thought that I'd better start with my comment now, before it becomes more difficult to sort out my ideas. So, here it goes:
1- I think that Zielinski's parallel applies wonderfully in the case of adults and adolescentes. I wouldn't be so sure when it comes to younger learners since they have this amazing capacity to imitate and, besides, they are normally far less self-conscious and afraid to make mistakes.
2- The points Zielinski makes resonate with me. However, I'd like to add that learning pronunciation is somewhat different from learning other skills. Sticking to the dancing analogy, once you have learnt and internalised the necessary body movements for each type of rhythm (=producing the different sounds), as painstaking as this process can be, you can feel fairly confident dancing to other songs of a similar style. No such thing with English pronunciation, which in many cases has no correlation with the written word. Perhaps, that makes it a bit more difficult to teach - and learn. But perhaps that was not the point of the question. Sorry about that!

Post has attachment
Photo

I've just submitted the worksheet and I must say that I found it pretty challenging, though quite enlightening at the same time. If anything, I've realised that I need to do tons of brushing up on my rusty knowledge of phonetics :) I'm planning to go through the feedback sheet tomorrow, with a clearer head. Much food for thought there. Thanks for a most interesting activity!

How did I improve my pronunciation? Well, I suppose that most of that process took place at Teacher Training College. There we learnt about the organs of speech and the role they play in producing the different English sounds. Of course we learnt the phonemic alphabet and received intensive practice in the form of dictations, transcriptions, reading aloud, etc. This was accompanied by L&R at a language lab. Along the 3 or 4 years we studied this subject, we covered more sophisticated areas such as the changes that occur in connected speech, intonation, etc.

But that was a long time ago :) Since then, I have tried to listen to as much English as possible (music, films, TV programmes, etc), taken the occasional course and so on.

I know I can't sound like a native speaker of any of the many world "Englishes", but at least I try to aim at something that can be considered fairly correct - standard?

Well, I find I do some of the things mentioned as examples in the wiki, such as clapping hands or moving my head to emphasise where stresses fall. With more advanced students, I have also used a diagram representing the mouth and the position of the tongue for the different vowels. The “BBC Learning English Pronunciation Tips” videos can also work well with older students.
Another thing I find very useful is asking students to put their fingers on their throat (or on top of their head) to feel the difference between voiced and voiceless sounds. This is something I use a lot when dealing with the past tense of regular verbs, for example.

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded