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Edith LaGraziana
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Be the change you want to see in the world! (Mahatma Gandhi) - Don't wait that someone other than yourself changes the world for you! (I)
Be the change you want to see in the world! (Mahatma Gandhi) - Don't wait that someone other than yourself changes the world for you! (I)

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The English brothers Oliver and Patrick could hardly be more different. The older one is pragmatic and struggling with his sexuality to the point of leading a double life, the younger one idealistic and attracted by spirituality in his wish to help people. Little surprisingly, they haven’t been in touch for years, when all of a sudden Patrick receives a letter from Oliver who entered a Hindu monastery in India and is about to take his vows to become a monk. As soon as he can, Patrick takes a plane for India to bring his little brother back to reason. But the Indian trip takes a different turn than expected because a phone call from Los Angeles that Oliver takes by accident forces Patrick to make a difficult confession.
Read more about this novel from the 1960s in my review of A Meeting by the River by Christopher Isherwood on Edith’s Miscellany at http://edith-lagraziana.blogspot.com/2017/02/meeting-by-river-by-christopher-isherwood.html. And please don’t hesitate to share the link with others, if you like what you find there. Thanks!

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World War II has just ended in southern Austria and the author who is not yet nineteen years old flows over with longing for the man she worships and adores. She puts her feelings into a series of letters that she never mails for the simple reason that only in her mind he is her lover, moreover an idealised one. Romantic fantasies that are ecstatic and mildly erotic mix with exuberant observations of nature and the author’s inner strife between joy and fear in view of the finally imminent start into a new life, i.e. the chance to attend university at last. The tone of the slim volume is lyrical and rhapsodic as can be expected from a young woman in love for the first time in life.
Read more about this slim volume in my review on Edith’s Miscellany at http://edith-lagraziana.blogspot.com/2017/02/letters-to-felician-by-ingeborg-bachmann.html. And if you like what I say about it, please don’t hesitate to share the link to the post. Thanks!

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My bookish discoveries of three years ago...

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Over seven years after their messy divorce, Ilana writes a letter to her ex-husband Alec asking for help with their angry and violent teenage son. Alec is all but happy to hear from her, but although he denied paternity of the boy, he is ready to use his influence as a renowned scholar and to send money to get him out of trouble and to support him on the way he chooses. In the course of a correspondence that spans several months and includes also Ilana’s religious new husband, Alec’s ancient lawyer in Jerusalem, their son Boaz and a few others they gradually manage to shake of anger and resentment. But Alec is fatally ill and Ilana’s husband lives by the strict rules of the Scriptures…
For more about this novel be invited to read my review on Edith’s Miscellany at http://edith-lagraziana.blogspot.com/2017/02/black-box-by-amos-oz.html. Please share my review if you like it.

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A middle-aged woman from Dakar in Senegal finds herself all of a sudden a widow. She has been forced to take care of herself and her children after twenty-five years of marriage because her beloved husband took a young second wife and then lived only with her although she didn’t divorce him. During her mourning confinement to the house she puts her grief over his death, over her misery in a polygamous marriage and over her marginal role in a strictly patriarchal Muslim society to paper. She writes a letter to her good childhood friend who had the courage to divorce her husband when he took a second wife and to embark on a career of her own that brought her to the USA.
For more about this amazing epistolary novel from the 1970s, read my review on Edith’s Miscellany at http://edith-lagraziana.blogspot.com/2017/02/so-long-letter-by-mariama-ba.html. Please share the review with others who might be interested. Thank you!
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