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Sorry, one more just because I wanted to put some camouflage on those feathers.
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Well, well, well. Fuzzy ornithischians now.
You've never seen a dinosaur, naturally, but you probably have a pretty good idea of what they look like. We've seen the same look over and over, across dozens of movies, books and museums: There's...
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SkeletalDrawing.com
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Skeletons and Bones  - 
 
Some of my favorite sauropods were being measured up against one another by the gents at SV-POW, so I decided to join the fun.
This entry was inspired by a post at the always-excellent SV-POW. They compared the size (and neck length) of Supersaurus, Brachiosaurus and  Diplodocus. In a stroke of serendipity I read their post as I was reworking my skeletal of the largest specimen of Diplodocus, NMMNH 3690 formerly known as Seismosaurus. Let's see if that changes anything... 
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Unfortunately it's behind a paywall, but for those of you looking for information on how to restore the muscles of early theropods this is about as good of a reference as you will get.
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SkeletalDrawing.com

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The "chicken from hell" dinosaur, Anzu, in all its skeletal glory.
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Henry Thomas's profile photoSkeletalDrawing.com's profile photoScott Hartman's profile photo
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Yes it is.
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What skeletal will be next? You decide!
So here is the deal: Spring break is coming up and I plan to do a skeletal reconstruction, so I thought I'd try something fun and let you, my loyal readers, choose which animal I'll restore. I've created a list of taxa for which I already have the data (and in some cases began scaling and preliminary work) to choose from. Vote for your favorite from now through Sunday!  [powr-poll label="Enter a Label"]
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Now that's cool.
 
Well, well, well. Fuzzy ornithischians now.
You've never seen a dinosaur, naturally, but you probably have a pretty good idea of what they look like. We've seen the same look over and over, across dozens of movies, books and museums: There's...
7
Bruce Bartrug's profile photoSkeletalDrawing.com's profile photo
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Paleontological results are tested exactly the same way any other science is, by gathering more data to see how well it conforms to our predictions. The fact that we don't always find the specimens we want to test things right away isn't any different from astronomers needing bigger telescopes (or new space probes) or theoretical physicists waiting on new and more powerful colliders (which themselves may not get the results they want). Paleontology conferences are known more for frivolity (go to the SVP auction sometime!) and enjoying one's colleagues, not vicious politics. Feduccia feels persecuted for reasons that are starting to be similar to Velikovsky - he simply refuses to even interact with the rest of the science, instead simply rewriting the same ideas over and over again every couple of years in obscure (sometimes not even peer-reviewed) articles and not citing even a fraction of the relevant literature.

Speaking of which, while you are most welcome for the citations don't make the mistake of viewing them as  a major portion of the work that opposes Feduccia, they were just the easiest to grab via Google searches. Dozens of papers and even more presentations are done every year on the topic - the evolution of birds from coelurosaurian theropods isn't merely well known, the transition of individual elements (like the palatine bone, or the nerves of the skull, or frontal lobes, or the avian-style supracoracoideus muscle, or the ascending process of the astragalus, or the reducing of the cervical ribs, or the reducing of the tail and concurrent shift from femur to knee-based locomotion, or the shift from laying lots of eggs at a time to shelling and laying just two at a time to finally just doing one at a time,. and on and on and on) are worked out. It's not a matter just of dinosaurs and birds sharing literally hundreds of characters not seen elsewhere, but that you can clearly see the acquisition of those characters adding up as you move up. It's not a joke or overconfidence when paleontologists say that the theropod-bird link is as well documented as the human/hominid link - it's that well understood and is documented in hundreds of publications.

Unfortunately I don't know of a single popular blog that sums it up, though Brusatte's textbook does a nice job of summing it up: http://www.amazon.com/Dinosaur-Paleobiology-Stephen-L-Brusatte/dp/0470656581/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1406252992&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=dinosaur+textbook+brusatte

If you send me a PM with your email I can send you some technical articles if you would like. And perhaps I need to do a couple of blog posts, as this whole discussion implies a greater need to clarify the topic for general readers than I had realized was there.
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SkeletalDrawing.com
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Skin, scales, and Fluff (dermal anatomy)  - 
 
Well, well, well. Fuzzy ornithischians now.
You've never seen a dinosaur, naturally, but you probably have a pretty good idea of what they look like. We've seen the same look over and over, across dozens of movies, books and museums: There's...
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SkeletalDrawing.com's profile photoMarko Bosscher's profile photoLukáš Hejtman (Froggy)'s profile photoWoodlandWaysMuseum's profile photo
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Agreed - the scaly tail (which is preserved in the fossil as well) with the fuzzy body is eerily reminiscent of rodents.
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SkeletalDrawing.com

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This entry was inspired by a post at the always-excellent SV-POW. They compared the size (and neck length) of Supersaurus, Brachiosaurus and  Diplodocus. In a stroke of serendipity I read their post as I was reworking my skeletal of the largest specimen of Diplodocus, NMMNH 3690 formerly known as Seismosaurus. Let's see if that changes anything... 
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Kam-Yung Soh's profile photoAna Rosa Gomez Cano's profile photo
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SkeletalDrawing.com
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Skeletons and Bones  - 
 
The "chicken from hell" dinosaur, Anzu, in all its skeletal glory.
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Tom Holtz's profile photoPino Di Legami's profile photo
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SkeletalDrawing.com
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General Discussion  - 
 
If you have a preference, be sure to take the poll.
So here is the deal: Spring break is coming up and I plan to do a skeletal reconstruction, so I thought I'd try something fun and let you, my loyal readers, choose which animal I'll restore. I've created a list of taxa for which I already have the data (and in some cases began scaling and preliminary work) to choose from. Vote for your favorite from now through Sunday!  [powr-poll label="Enter a Label"]
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SkeletalDrawing.com
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Skeletons and Bones  - 
 
To start the year out right I've totally overhauled all of my sauropod skeletals (and their sauropodomorph kin). Check out the updated gallery on my site, or hit up the link below to read about the major points of anatomical emphasis for this overhaul.

I hope you all enjoy it (or at least find it useful/stimulation)
Let's start out 2014 right, with a bunch of new and overhauled sauropod skeletal reconstructions. All of the reconstructions of your favorite four-legged dinosaur behemoths (and some of their smallish ancestors) have been brought up to date. For more on this and a look at some of the important anatomical changes take a click beyond the fold to check it out.
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T. rex's profile photoSusan Stone's profile photoWilliam Norman's profile photoGiusepe Di Legami's profile photo
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+Len Smith You're welcome, we wouldn't want that!
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Have them in circles
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Dinosaurs, Science, & Anatomy
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A blog (and website) dedicated to the science and art of reconstructing extinct animals.
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