Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Yemen Institute for Arabic Language
111 followers -
The premier institute for learning and teaching Arabic as a foreign language
The premier institute for learning and teaching Arabic as a foreign language

111 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Weekly markets have continued to function throughout the Arab world. Most of them are named from the day of the week on which they are held. They usually have open spaces specifically designated for their use inside cities.
Examples of surviving markets are the Wednesday Market in Amman that specializes in the sale of used products, the Ghazl market held every Friday in Baghdad specializing in pets; the Fina’ Market in Marrakech offers performance acts such as singing, music, acrobats and circus activities.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
As-Salamu ‘Alaykum Textbook – Teacher’s Guide : كتاب السلام عليكم - دليل المعلم
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The present tense in Arabic
There are two tenses in Arabic: the past tense (الماضي al-māḍī) and the present tense (المضارع al-muḍāriʻ). The future tense in Classical Arabic is formed by adding either the prefix سـ sa- or the separate word سوف sawfa onto the beginning of the present tense verb, e.g. سيكتب sa-yaktubu or سوف يكتب sawfa yaktubu ‘he will write’.
In some contexts, the tenses represent aspectual distinctions rather than tense distinctions. The usage of Arabic tenses is as follows:
• The past tense often (but not always) specifically has the meaning of a past perfective, i.e. it expresses the concept of ‘he did’ as opposed to ‘he was doing’. The latter can be expressed using the combination of the past tense of the verb كان kāna ‘to be’ with the present tense or active participle, e.g. كان يكتبُ kāna yaktubu or كان كاتبٌ kāna kātibun ‘he was writing... more...
http://asaktextbook.com/teachers/articles-studies-tips/t578.html
Commenting is disabled for this post.

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Assimilation of The Infixed ت in Form VIII - افتعل

Since you have had Arabic before, you have probably seen verbs like إتَّبَعَ , إضْطَرَّ , إزْدادَ , and إصْطَدَمَ These are all #examples of Form #VIII verbs that have assimilated the #infixed ت Students are usually not pleased when they first see this phenomenon. I am sure you are not any more pleased now than you were then. At least this time around, I hope, you are less #intimidated by the language and realize that many #things are nowhere near as difficult as they seem.

What is happening with the above verbs is that the first radical of each of them is #affecting the ت which is infixed in order to form Form VIII. There are actually nine offending letters which cause changes to the ت. You do not need to memorize them, although I will list them below. All you need to be aware of is the kind of changes they make to the ت so that you will be able to identify the roots of words which incorporate these changes. For example, you see the word إدَّعى (#which will not have the shadda in most texts) and wonder what the hell it is. Well, IF you know that the letter د assimilates the ت completely (I know that it is a big “if’), you will be able to guess that the word you are looking at is the Form VIII of the verb يَدْعو , دعا with which you fell in love some chapters ago.
The offending #letters are all produced near the front of the mouth. They are either dental or emphatic. They are:
ت ث د ذ ز ص ض ط ظ

More.. http://asaktextbook.com/teachers/articles-studies-tips/t573.html
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Arabic verbs are noted for an unusual system of derivation. From any particular root various verb stems may be formed. Western scholars usually refer to these derivations as “form I”, “form II”, ... up through “form XV,” though these designations are not used indigenously, where they are referred to by derivations of the verb فعل ‎(“to do”). Accordingly, form I would be فَعَلَ (faʿala), form II would be فَعّلَ (faʿʿala), etc. These forms refer to triliteral roots (those made of three consonants). There are also quadriliteral roots, made up of four consonants, which come in four forms, “form Iq”, “form IIq”, “form IIIq” and “form IVq”. Triliteral forms XI through XV and quadriliteral forms IIIq and IVq are rare and tend to be intransitive, often stative, verbs (having the meaning “to be or become X” where X is an adjective).

These forms and their associated participles and verbal nouns are the primary means of forming vocabulary in Arabic. All of the examples shown here are the citation forms, which in Arabic means the 3rd-person masculine singular perfect (e.g., “he did”, “he wrote”).

Form IX[edit]
Perfective اِفْعَلَّ ‎(ifʿálla), imperfective يَفْعَلُّ ‎(yafʿallu)

This stem is formed by dropping the vowel of the first radical, adding liaison (ا) as necessary, and doubling the final radical. This form is used by only a small number of verbs denoting color or bodily defect.

احمر (iḥmárra) — to turn red, to blush.
اصفر (iṣfárra) — to turn yellow, to pale.
ابيض (ibyáḍḍa) — to turn white.
ازرق (izráqqa) — to turn blue.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded