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Jay Gordon
Attended Western Michigan University
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Jay Gordon

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It's Friday and +Kirk Jordan ought to dance. 
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thank you.  I am.  And I mean to get back to that link you sent me last week, but I have been a running man.  Speaking of which.  ARe these some cool graphics going on right now.
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"In the real world of the first black president and unprecedented numbers of black faces in high military, corporate and government positions, black child poverty is rising not falling. Black unemployment is the same double white unemployment as it was 50 or 60 years ago and climbing. In the real world black women's wages are catching up with black men's wages only because black male unemployment is rising and their wages doing the opposite. Given all this, it should be clear to anybody without ideological blinders that lifting up black millionaires, black politicians, black entertainers and celebrating black celebrities does absolutely nothing to improve the lives of ordinary African Americans.

What these kinds of black “success stories” actually do is narrow the boundaries of our struggle to the individualized pursuit of wealth and status and consumption that neoliberal American prescribes. If we cannot or should not throw shade on Junior Bridgeman or Magic Johnson or whoever for their failure to stand up and pay a living wage, for their willingness to fund the lobbying that keeps wages low and makes it easy for employers to cheat workers, and all but impossible to form unions, then we close off any possibility of collective action that benefits the masses of our people.."
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For later
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From Capitalism: A Ghost Story

"In India, the 300 million of us who belong to the new, post-IMF 'reforms' middle class —the market— live side by side with the spirits of the nether world, the poltergeists of dead rivers, dry wells, bald mountains and denuded forests; the ghosts of 250,000 debt-ridden farmers who have killed themselves, and the 800 million who have been impoverished and dispossessed to make way for us. And who survive on less than half a dollar, which is 20 Indian rupees, a day.

Mukesh Ambani is personally worth $20 billion. He holds a majority controlling share in Reliance Industries Limited (RIL), a company with a market capitalization of $47 billion and global business interests that include petrochemicals, oil, natural gas, polyester fibre, Special Economic Zones, fresh food retail, high schools, life sciences research and stem cell storage services. RIL recently bought 95 per cent shares in Infotel, a TV consortium that controls 27 TV news and entertainment channels in almost every regional language [...]

RIL is one of a handful of corporations that run India. Some of the others are the Tatas, Jindals, Vedanta, Mittals, Infosys, Essar. Their race for growth has spilled across Europe, Central Asia, Africa and Latin America. Their nets are cast wide; they are visible and invisible, over-ground as well as underground. The Tatas, for example, run more than 100 companies in 80 countries. They are one of India’s oldest and largest private sector power companies. They own mines, gas fields, steel plants, telephone, cable TV and broadband networks, and they run whole townships. They manufacture cars and trucks, and own the Taj Hotel chain, Jaguar, Land Rover, Daewoo, Tetley Tea, a publishing company, a chain of bookstores, a major brand of iodized salt and the cosmetics giant Lakme—which I think they’ve sold now. Their advertising tagline could easily be: You Can’t Live Without Us.

According to the rules of the Gush-Up Gospel, the more you have, the more you can have [...]

Which of us sinners was going to cast the first stone? Not me, who lives off royalties from corporate publishing houses. We all watch Tata Sky, we surf the net with Tata Photon, we ride in Tata taxis, we stay in Tata Hotels, sip our Tata tea in Tata bone china and stir it with teaspoons made of Tata Steel. We buy Tata books in Tata bookshops. We eat Tata salt. We are under siege.

If the sledgehammer of moral purity is to be the criterion for stone-throwing, then the only people who qualify are those who have been silenced already. Those who live outside the system; the outlaws in the forests or those whose protests are never covered by the press, or the well-behaved dispossessed, who go from tribunal to tribunal, bearing witness and giving testimony.

But this—you know, I’m talking about this because, as I said, you know, for the poor, India has the army and the paramilitary and the air force and the displacement and the police and the concentration camps. But what are you going to do to the rest? And there, I talk about the exquisite art of corporate philanthropy, you know, and how these very mining corporations and the people who are involved in, really, the pillaging of not just the poor, but of the mountains, of the rivers, of everything, are now—have now turned their attention to the arts, you know? So, apart from the fact that, of course, they own the TV channels and they fund all of that, they, for example, fund the Jaipur Literary Festival—Literature Festival, where the biggest writers in the world come, and they discuss free speech, and the logo is shining out there behind you. But you don’t hear about the fact that in the forest the bodies are piling up, you know? The public hearings where people have the right to ask these corporations what is being done to their environment, to their homes, they are just silenced. They are not allowed to speak. There are collusions between these companies and the police, the Salwa Judum."
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Jay Gordon

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A pastor paid for my haircut when I let him go ahead of me, so I figured the purchase of a religious book was in order. ^_~
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From +Lord Rake 
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Amazon's book recommendations are not an honest attempt to figure out what a customer might like. Publishers pay to have their books promoted this way.

"Like the other titans of the online world – Google, Facebook, Yahoo and to a lesser extent, Microsoft – Amazon is driven by data and algorithms. But not entirely. What many of its customers may not realise is that the results generated by Amazon's search engine are partly determined by promotional fees extracted from publishers. In his book The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, Brad Stone describes one campaign to exert pressure for better terms on the more vulnerable publishers. It was known internally as the gazelle project, after Bezos suggested "that Amazon should approach these small publishers the way a cheetah would pursue a sickly gazelle". (With a nice Orwellian touch, company lawyers later changed the name to the "small publisher negotiation programme".)

That's a revealing metaphor: capitalism red in tooth and claw. And it's a useful antidote to the soothing PR of the corporations that now dominate our networked world. Up to now, they have succeeded in branding themselves as different in important ways from the bad old industrial behemoths of the past. Google has its much-vaunted "don't be evil" slogan, for example. Facebook just wants to help everyone to hook up to "share" and "like" stuff. (Strangely, there is no "dislike" button on Planet Facebook.) Amazon is fanatically committed to the philosophy that you – the customer – are always right. And so on.

As a public relations posture this branding strategy has been a brilliant success. We loathe, fear or suspect many of the companies that dominate the offline world – energy utilities, oil companies and banks, to name just three sectors. Yet the giants of cyberspace seem to escape such opprobrium. Instead, it seems that we cannot get enough of the "free" services that they offer.

Yet in Darwinian terms these new corporate giants are just the latest stage in the evolution of the public corporation. They exist to create wealth – vast quantities of it – for their founders and shareholders. Their imperative is to grow and achieve dominance in their chosen markets – as well as in others which they now deem to be within their reach. They are as hostile to trade unions, taxation and regulation as John D Rockefeller, JP Morgan and Andrew Carnegie ever were in their day. The only differences are that the new titans employ far fewer people, enjoy higher margins and are less harassed by governments than their predecessors."
Despite their superficially user-friendly ways, the titans of the net are no different from the big names of American corporate history, writes John Naughton
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Jay Gordon

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For +Josué Santos Martín who wants me to post more of what I don't post. Word on the street is that this is +john ashfield's second favourite European musician.
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+Josué Santos Martín maybe it was his moves around the pole . . . I thought you'd like as it was some pretty enthusiastic trolling.
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People
Have him in circles
392 people
Education
  • Western Michigan University
    M.A. Epistemology and Philosophy of Science, 2010 - 2012
  • Rollins College
    B.A. English and Philosophy, 2004 - 2009
Story
Tagline
Doubt Truth to be a Liar
Introduction
I build sledgehammers and use them to smash all sorts of idols, including my own . . .
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Jay
Reasonably priced lunch specials . . .
Food: Very goodDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
1 review
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